UVa Class Schedules (Unofficial, Lou's List v2.10)   New Features
Schedule of Classes with Additional Descriptions - Spring 2021
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African-American and African Studies
 AAS 2559New Course in African and African American Studies
 Intro to Race, Class, Politics & the Environment
Spring 2021  19388 001SEM (3 Units)Open 15 / 20Kimberly FieldsWe 3:30pm - 6:00pm Web-Based Course
 This course introduces students to the adoption and implementation of environmental policy in the United States and examines issues of environmental quality and social justice. We will concentrate on federal, state and local governance and relations across these levels. In turn, we will compare the abilities of state and federal governments to develop and implement environmental efforts and policy, as well as their consequences. The course takes as axiomatic the premise that all people have a right to live in a clean environment free from hazardous pollution or contamination, and to the natural resources necessary to sustain health and livelihood. With this as our starting point, we will question why, and through what social, political and economic processes, some people are denied this basic right. How is it that certain populations of people do not have access to basic resources, or are systematically burdened with pollution or environmental hazards to a greater extent than other populations? What are the social relations of production and power that contribute to these outcomes? What can be done? We begin by examining the philosophical foundations and history of the environmental justice movement and foundational concepts such as justice, race and class. We then explore these concepts through a series of case studies of urban environmental (in)justice in the U.S. Through these case studies we will examine environmental justice issues in urban and rural settings; the strategies and politics of poor peoples’ environmental justice movements; and climate justice.
 AAS 3500Intermediate Seminar in African-American & African Studies
 Race, Law & the American Constitution
Spring 2021  13367 001SEM (3 Units)Open 9 / 10Kimberly FieldsWe 6:00pm - 8:30pm Web-Based Course
 Law is everywhere, in our lives and in our society. It is a dominant force in our culture. Each of us is likely to feel the heavy hand of the law in one form or another at some point in our lives – some more than others. This course introduces students to the substance of the Constitution, the conditions under which it was developed and the ways in which it has shaped and has been shaped by ideas about and considerations of race. Two main goals guide this course. Our first goal is to identify and appreciate the role(s) ideas about and considerations of race have played in shaping and influencing the ongoing processes of interpreting and applying constitutional law to our lives, our society, and our politics. Our second goal is to develop an increased awareness of the stark consequences of constitutional decisions for society, especially as it pertains to marginalized populations. We will spend a good deal of our time reading, thinking about, and dissecting the influence of ideas about and considerations of race on key Supreme Court decisions that have shaped and directed constitutional law in America. This means analyzing, weighing, and debating the reasoning, logic and wisdom of the opinions, particularly as they impact the lives of racially categorized and marginalized people in America. The reality is that nine unelected justices, influenced by multiple internal and external factors, with life tenure in Washington, D.C. render decisions affecting basic, fundamental questions in society (the death penalty, hate speech, in what ways the state can regulate and restrict life and liberty, the role of religion in public life, and so on). As we study the cases, be mindful of the political nature of the courts and judges. What is the Court’s proper place and role in American democracy, especially with regard to the political, social and economic status and well-being of minorities and historically marginalized people? How does one explain its inconsistent and at times illiberal decisions on issues involving race and the racial dimensions of inequality? What are the host of political pressures that influence the judiciary at various points in the legal system, from the courts’ formation to their decision-making, to other critical points in between? How should the Constitution be viewed, interpreted, applied and used considering it includes things like the 3/5th clause and was the instrument used to construct governmental institutions, procedures and norms that were designed to accommodate slavery and racial, ethnic and economic discrimination? While Supreme Court decisions are our core materials, this is very much an African American Studies class. We are more concerned with the relationship between racism and the political, institutional and policy implications of cases than about legal doctrine for its own sake. Our purpose is to understand what the Court has said about the Constitution's meaning, to identify and assess the underlying theories, interests and considerations that inform the opinions of the Supreme Court and examine the effects of Supreme Court decisions on our society, particularly as they apply to lives and experiences of historically marginalized racial minorities. But because the Court is also a political institution, we will consider how and to what degree constitutional decision-making resembles ordinary politics. To what extent, for example, does public opinion, particularly as it relates to race, influence the Court?
 Caribbean Cultural & Literary Studies
Spring 2021  19399 005SEM (3 Units)Open 5 / 30 (8 / 30)Marlene L. DautWe 2:00pm - 4:30pm Web-Based Course
 Beginning with national literary developments in Haiti, this course expands to consider writing from Barbados, Cuba, Trinidad, Jamaica, Antigua, and Bermuda. We will examine these writings, both fictional and non-fictional, to help us to think about whether and/or how a coherent Caribbean literary tradition exists across geographical, linguistic, national, and indeed, imperial lines.
 AAS 3745Currents in African Literature
Spring 2021  20131 001SEM (3 Units)Open 13 / 24 (18 / 24)Njelle HamiltonTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm Web-Based Course
 This undergraduate seminar on contemporary African Literature takes the form of an in-depth study of the literary works of two brilliant, prolific young Nigerian women writers: feminist and social realist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and African-futurist Nnedi Okorafor, two of the most globally well-known and -loved authors the continent has produced. Through close analysis of their novels and other writings we will consider broad questions such as: How applicable are Western feminist theories to non-Western experiences? How are traditional literary forms such as the bildungsroman subverted by race, gender, and postcoloniality? How do sociopolitical realities inform literary expression? How does trauma affect narrative? How is Nigeria depicted in international news in contrast to how locals perceive and narrate their own reality? And how can these novels help us understand the contemporary African novel within the contexts of larger historical and cultural forces, events, and movements? Beyond the ultimate goal of affording you a deeper appreciation for African and Nigerian literature, history, and current events, this course aims to lead you through the process of crafting a sophisticated argument and writing about literary texts in their cultural and historical contexts. Assignments include: short essays comparing both authors, a weekly African News forum, group research and presentation on Nigerian history, and a final contemplative essay.
 AAS 4570Advanced Research Seminar in African-American & African Studies
 Caribbean Sci-Fi
Spring 2021  14166 001SEM (3 Units)Open 4 / 18 (14 / 18)Njelle HamiltonTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pm Web-Based Course
 In this advanced undergraduate seminar, you will encounter Caribbean writers working at the cutting edge of SF/F, and discover novels, stories, artwork and film that center Caribbean settings, peoples, and culture, even as they expand the definition of genre. Authors and auteurs from the English-, Spanish- and French-speaking Caribbean might include: Nalo Hopkinson, Tobias Buckell, Karen Lord, Junot Díaz, Rita Indiana, Marcia Douglas, Ernest Pepin, René Depestre, and Agustín de Rojas. Assignments will include short critical essays and a long research paper where you think through how Caribbean texts redefine, expand, or critique mainstream SF/F.
 Age of the Haitian Revolution
Spring 2021  19401 002SEM (3 Units)Open 3 / 10Marlene L. DautTu 2:00pm - 4:30pm Web-Based Course
 The Haitian Revolution (1791-1804)—a thirteen-year series of slave revolts and military strikes— resulted in the abolition of slavery in the French colony of Saint-Domingue in 1793 and its subsequent independence and rebirth in January 1804 as Haiti, the first independent and slavery-free nation of the American hemisphere. To this day, Haitian independence remains the most significant development in the history of modern democracy. The theories undergirding it – that no human beings could ever be enslaved – continue to define contemporary political ideas about what it means to be free. But in the early 19th century, Haiti was the only example in the Americas of a nation populated primarily by former enslaved Africans who had become free and independent. Other nations, including France, England, and the United States, were determined to prevent abolition and their colonies from becoming free and thus refused to recognize Haitian sovereignty. While still one of the least well known events in modern history, this course explores the global repercussions of Haiti’s revolution for freedom.
American Studies
 AMST 1559New Course in American Studies
 Medical Narratives
 Medical Narratives
Spring 2021  20192 002Lecture (3 Units)Closed 20 / 20Anna BrickhouseTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pm Web-Based Course
 In this introductory American Studies seminar, we will read American short stories alongside other texts (including film scenes, television, and advertisements) to learn how ideas about ailing and injured bodies and minds; doctors, nurses, and patients; disease and madness as well as health and sanity, normality and abnormality, have been shaped and contested throughout US cultural history. The course will also introduce the medical humanities field and its aims. How can insights drawn from disability studies, critical race studies, and refugee studies, for example, help to create a more robust version of the medical humanities? The course is designed for both pre-med students and those considering a major in American Studies (or both).
 AMST 2422Point of View Journalism
Spring 2021  20176 001SEM (3 Units)Closed 10 / 0 (23 / 0)Lisa GoffTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pm Web-Based Course
 No waitlist, but spots often open up--email the instructor at lg6t@virginia.edu.
 This course examines the history and practice of “point-of-view” journalism, a controversial but credible alternative to the dominant model of “objectivity” on the part of the news media. Not to be confused with “fake news,” point-of-view journalism has a history as long as the nation’s, from Tom Paine and Benjamin Franklin in the eighteenth century to "muckrakers" like Ida B. Wells Barnett and Ida Tarbell at the end of the nineteenth, and “New Journalism” practitioners like Tom Wolfe, Hunter Thompson, and Barbara Ehrenreich in the twentieth. Twenty-first century point-of-view practitioners include news organizations on the right (Fox News, Breitbart News Network) and left (Vice, Jacobin, MSNBC, Democracy Now), as well as prominent voices like Ta-Nehisi Coates, Rebecca Solnit, Jia Tolentino, and Sarah Smarsh. We will also consider the rise of “fake news.” A term formerly used to indicate the work of entertainers such as Jon Stewart and Steven Colbert, who pilloried the news (and newsmakers) in order to interpret them, “fake news” is now an established practice of the far right, as well as a political slur used to denigrate the work of mainstream (center and left-of-center) news organizations.
 AMST 2559New Course in American Studies
 Commodifying Race and Gender
Spring 2021  19747 002Lecture (3 Units)Open 19 / 20David CoyocaTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 This course examines narratives of racialized masculinity and femininity in contemporary popular culture. We will analyze how these narratives operate as commodities within the pop culture industry. We will take an interdisciplinary approach to think about how racial, gender, and sexual difference is negotiated through media and popular culture. We will look at a wide range of examples such as hip hop, superhero movies, TikTok dances, and more.
 Technologies of American Life
 >>If this class is full, you can register for it as HIUS 2559
Spring 2021  19748 100Lecture (3 Units)Open 31 / 60 (40 / 60)David SingermanMoWe 10:00am - 10:50am Web-Based Course
 >>If this class is full, you can register for it as HIUS 2559
 You might have learned the legends of genius inventors, but in this course we'll explore a different history: how technologies have shaped the lives of most Americans, and how ordinary Americans shaped our common technologies. We’ll explore topics like the amazing capabilities of pre-1492 civilizations, how enslaved people created new species of plants, how photography was like 19th-century time travel, and how Silicon Valley’s innovators may have copied schoolchildren from Minnesota.
 AMST 3221Hands-On Public History: Slavery and Reconstruction
Spring 2021  13260 001SEM (3 Units)Permission 13 / 15Lisa GoffTu 3:30pm - 6:00pm Monroe Hall 110
 This is a year-long class offered through the Civic and Community Engagement program. If you want to join mid-year, you will need to talk with the instructor about your interest, and the expectations re: digital storytelling skills.
 This year-long class is a part of a 3-year collaboration with local community groups to conduct historical research into African American history in central Virginia. Students will conduct fieldwork near Charlottesville, and will investigate past and current examples of the public history of slavery and Reconstruction at sites like Monticello and Montpelier, as well as lesser known sites. We will work together with community organizations and churches to geolocate undocumented sites of African American history, including gravesites; and create digital Story Maps that seek to unearth the hidden histories of enslaved and free African Americans in the 19th and early 20th centuries—and the legacies of those histories today.
 AMST 3323Hemispheric Latinx Literature and Culture
Spring 2021  19805 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 7 / 24 (18 / 24)Carmen LamasTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 This course offers a survey of Latinx literature from a hemispheric perspective. We explore how the histories of US, Latin America, Europe, Africa and Asia come together to produce novels, poems, essays, and films that are now referred to as distinctly Latinx. In addition to exploring the integrated global histories that produce Latinidades, we will analyze how race, class, gender and sexuality impact Latinx literature, film and other artistic forms. All readings, writing, and discussions are in English.
Anthropology
 ANTH 2541Topics in Linguistics
 Language Death and Revitalization
Spring 2021  20355 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 27 / 30Nathan WendteTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pm Web-Based Course
 The United Nations declared 2019 the Year of Indigenous Languages in order to raise awareness of the rapid rate at which the world's linguistic diversity is being depleted. This course examines the causes, effects, and ideologies surrounding language endangerment. It also explores the creative processes by which some communities and individuals are resisting the forces of linguistic homogenization and erasure.
 ANTH 3541Topics in Linguistics
 Language Change
Spring 2021  20354 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 27 / 30Nathan WendteTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm Web-Based Course
 Along the span of history and across the globe, the one constant of human language is change. This course introduces the study and analysis of language change over time in a variety of domains and contexts. Students will learn how to identify and decode processes and results of historical language change and apply these skills to analyze data bearing on relationships and contacts between different languages and their speakers. This course fulfills the Historical requirement for Linguistics majors.
 ANTH 3559New Course in Anthropology
 Creoles & Creolization
Spring 2021  20356 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 16 / 30Nathan WendteTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pm Web-Based Course
 Linguistics as a field has historically had difficulty accounting for local vernaculars known as creoles. In this course, we consider several proposals for analyzing these languages and explaining their unique origins and characteristics. We broach important theoretical debates concerning creoles as a linguistic type, the creole continuum, and the concept of de-creolization. Finally, we attempt to answer the perennial question: What is a creole? The answer is at least as much anthropological as it is linguistic. Examples will be drawn primarily from Franco-Creolophone Louisiana. Familiarity with French, though not required, will be useful.
 ANTH 5541Topics in Linguistics
 Language Revival in the Eastern Tribes
Spring 2021  19364 001Lecture (3 Units)Permission10 / 10Mark SicoliTu 5:00pm - 7:30pm Web-Based Course
 Course surveys scholarship and community practices for language revival with a focus on Native American tribes of the mid-Atlantic and other Indigenous peoples who are working for cultural reclamation using historical resources. Students participate in collaborative research with members of the Nottoway Indian Tribe of Virginia. A background of several prior classes in linguistics and instructor permission is required to take this course. Students will be using comparative study of Iroquoian languages to help reconstruct lexical and grammatical resources for the Nottoway Indian Tribe of Virginia’s language revival program. Fulfills CAS Disciplines: Cultures & Societies of the World and Linguistics Major and MA student elective.
 Lakota Language Structures
Spring 2021  20248 002Lecture (3 Units)Closed10 / 10Armik MirzayanTh 5:00pm - 7:30pm Web-Based Course
 This course introduces students to a descriptive study and exploration of the structures and discourse patterns in the Lakota language and its related dialects and languages within the Indigenous cultural landscape of North America. Specifically, we focus on describing Lakota phonological, morphological, and syntactic structures/relations through examination of patterns in discourse, in both historical and modern narratives. Fulfills the Language Structure requirement for Linguistics majors and graduate students.
Arts Administration
 ARAD 3550Topics of Arts in Context
 The Arts & STEM
Spring 2021  11724 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 51 / 90George SampsonTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 Steaming up the Windows: The Arts & STEM is the latest in a 15-year series of Topics courses called The Arts in Context. These collage-like courses challenge students to make their own sense or meaning of disparate bodies of information. This class operates like Design Thinking, where peers do some of the research. The final is a 10-page paper where each student "discovers" the course for themselves. The Arts and STEM includes visual art abstraction and free jazz music among Arts disciplines; the Complexity Science of Physics and the ancient knowledge of Indigenous people and asks how these domains might address our society's thinking about the "wicked problem" of Climate Change. Issues include environmental science, politics, power structures, the globalized and long-term temporal frame of the problem. To all of this, we ask ourselves: What do the arts teach us and how might they help?
History of Art and Architecture
 ARAH 9505Seminar in Ancient Art/Archaeology
 Water, Architecture, and the Senses
Spring 2021  20120 001SEM (3 Units)Open7 / 12Dylan RogersMo 3:30pm - 6:00pm Web-Based Course
 Moving water in architectural spaces has the ability to create unique experiences that can excite the senses. This course explores how water has been manipulated in different ways over time through various architectural case studies from across the globe, stretching from the ancient Near East to today. Special emphasis will be placed on the sensory qualities of water--and how they can alter landscapes, built environments, and an individual's own personal experience. By examining the relationship between water and architecture, we will also begin to problematize how societies approach various water-related issues (such as access to, commodification of, and destruction by water), which are particularly relevant today.
 ARAH 9565Seminar in Art Theory, Comparative & Other Topics
 Real Abstractions (in Critical Theory and Beyond)
Spring 2021  20119 002SEM (3 Units)Open 5 / 12Christa RobbinsTu 1:00pm - 3:30pm Web-Based Course
 This course examines the treatment of illusion and abstraction in critical theory. Starting with foundational texts, such as Kant’s Critique of Judgment and Marx’s Capital, we will work through key texts in critical theory in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. This course is partly a response to an influential “anti-aesthetic” tendency, in late-twentieth-century art theory, to cast both abstraction and illusion as deleterious concepts. In order to interrogate this assessment, we will approach ‘abstraction’ and ‘illusion’ as keywords that have both enabled and inhibited critical discourse and practice. Additional keywords and counter-terms to be explored include perspective, realism, ideology, reification, apparatus, spectacle, embodiment and personhood. Students will be asked to bring in a variety of cultural examples to stand beside or against, to confirm, counter, and otherwise rejoin the various aesthetic and political theories we discuss. While the course is housed in the Art and Architectural History Program, our discussion will not be limited to the visual arts. All are welcome.
Architecture
 ARCH 5424Direct Cinema Media Fabrics
Website  10065 001Lecture (3 Units)Permission12 / 15Earl MarkTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm Web-Based Course
 Direct Cinema Media Fabrics is an interdisciplinary workshop and seminar. The cinema has expanded to encompass a greater range of media and methods, transcending architecture, sculpture, theater, animation, scientific discovery and environmental art. We explore methods of capturing moving images, sound and potentially other sensory input through video, computervision and microcontroller sensors. We explore ways to discern key patterns and shapes through coding computer graphics procedures. We then speculatively and creatively transform the input into 2D or 3D virtual or physical forms. A significant part of the class will be devoted to learning to write short Java programs though the processing graphics platform that was developed at the MIT Media lab (see processing.org). The software runs natively on both the Apple and Windows operating systems. The final project may be in the form of video movie, computer animation or a physical interactive medium.
 ARCH 5500Special Topics in Architecture
 Rapid Shelter: Refugees & Communities in Disaster
Website  10097 002Lecture (3 Units)Permission14 / 13 (14 / 13)Earl MarkTuTh 9:30am - 10:45am Web-Based Course
 Rapid Shelter Displaced People is a small interdiscipinary independent projects seminar that seeks to revisit assumptions for rapidly deployed emergency shelter for forcibly displaced people. The United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) estimates that there are 70.8 million forcibly displaced people worldwide who are about 2 million more than one year ago and of which about 25.9 million are classified as refugees. Approximately 37,000 people are forced to flee each day due to conflict and persecution, up from approximately 23,600 two years ago. These figures are the highest in recorded history. Displaced from their familar surroundings, traumatized, separated from family, needing food, protection from the weather, sanitation, and safety, it seems self-evident that rapidly deployed shelter within a secure perimeter is an essential first step to ensuring the survival of people facing physical displacement and upheaval. Yet, temporary settlements of refugees that spring up under urgent conditions may expand and last well beyond expectations. The initial footprint may soon become obsolete with respect to ensuring the health, adjustment, self determination, religious and cultural practices, and sense of hope needed. Case studies include conditions of forcible displacement through political, religious persecution, war, natural or environmental disasters or epidemics.The list of speakers may be amended according to the evolution of topics. They include faculty and other experts from a diverse range of disciplines and with signficant international experience.
Architectural History
 ARH 3006Digital Humanities and Visual Culture
 Untold Narratives of Albemarle County
Spring 2021  19072 001SEM (3 Units)Open6 / 8 (6 / 8)Lisa ReillyTu 1:00pm - 3:30pm Web-Based Course
 Digital tools have completely transformed the questions humanists ask, how they view the world and how they disseminate their scholarship. These new possibilities both open and close possible avenues of investigation. This course will introduce students to tools relevant to the analysis of visual culture and architecture as well as the process of how to learn to use digital tools – critical given the constantly changing array of options- as well as how to develop a digital project. Together with experts from UVA’s Scholar’s Lab we will critically assess the role of digital humanities in art and architectural history through an analysis of selected digital projects as well as specific tools. We will consider questions such as: What are the tools that have made this work possible? How have these same tools imposed limits on the project under examination? How can these tools advance on our own work and the dissemination of our scholarship? We will analyze what these tools make possible in terms of our own research and learn how to apply them. We will work through the process of digital project development using Design Thinking Methods from selecting objects of study, to recording those objects, constructing a database to visualizing the data and finally representing it through a digital project using Storymap. This course has been developed in part in response to a Virginia Center for the Humanities panel of June 2021 which pointed out that fewer than 1% of historical markers in Virginia are for sites associated with people of color and women. We will work with Albemarle County’s Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion to develop Storymap projects focused on untold narratives related to women and people of color in the county.This course is open to undergraduate and graduate students from any discipline. No previous experience or familiarity with digital humanities work is required or assumed.
 ARH 3604Field Methods I Building Archaeology
Spring 2021  18966 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed 5 / 6 (5 / 6)Alissa DiamondFr 9:00am - 11:30am Web-Based Course
 In this class, we will explore methods for critical interrogation of both archival materials and physical evidence in exploring the everyday historical landscape of Locust Grove, Virginia. Methods will be introduced alongside theoretical frames and particular approaches to both physical spaces and historical archives that center on questions of power, social categorization, and understanding interactions between economic systems and physical spaces. The class will also introduce the students to methods of digital mapping and spatial analysis, using online GIS ArcOnline tools. As a field-based course, some of our class time will be spent in the field examining, recording, and critically interrogating physical spaces. Students will be expected to apply these recording and analysis techniques that are central to the class to site within the study area on their own.
 ARH 4591Undergraduate Seminar in the History of Architecture
 Vikings into Kings
Spring 2021  18977 001SEM (3 Units)Closed5 / 12 (13 / 12)Lisa ReillyTh 1:00pm - 3:30pm Web-Based Course
 The marauding Vikings are familiar from popular culture including the well-known tv series. Somehow they become kings who commission such extraordinary works as the Bayeux Tapestry, Durham Cathedral and the Cappella Palatina. This course will trace their transformation from raiders and traders across Europe and beyond into rulers of the wealthiest kingdoms in Europe through an exploration of their material culture. This fascinating transformation will be grappled with through discussions and a series of short writing assignments culminating in a research project. Seminar participants will learn how to organize, prepare and write a research paper. This course will fulfill the second writing requirement.
 ARH 8006Digital Humanities and Visual Culture
 Untold Narratives of Albemarle County
Spring 2021  19025 001SEM (3 Units)Closed8 / 8 (8 / 8)Lisa ReillyTu 1:00pm - 3:30pm Web-Based Course
 Digital tools have completely transformed the questions humanists ask, how they view the world and how they disseminate their scholarship. These new possibilities both open and close possible avenues of investigation. This course will introduce students to tools relevant to the analysis of visual culture and architecture as well as the process of how to learn to use digital tools – critical given the constantly changing array of options- as well as how to develop a digital project. Together with experts from UVA’s Scholar’s Lab we will critically assess the role of digital humanities in art and architectural history through an analysis of selected digital projects as well as specific tools. We will consider questions such as: What are the tools that have made this work possible? How have these same tools imposed limits on the project under examination? How can these tools advance on our own work and the dissemination of our scholarship? We will analyze what these tools make possible in terms of our own research and learn how to apply them. We will work through the process of digital project development using Design Thinking Methods from selecting objects of study, to recording those objects, constructing a database to visualizing the data and finally representing it through a digital project using Storymap. This course has been developed in part in response to a Virginia Center for the Humanities panel of June 2021 which pointed out that fewer than 1% of historical markers in Virginia are for sites associated with people of color and women. We will work with Albemarle County’s Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion to develop Storymap projects focused on untold narratives related to women and people of color in the county. This course is open to undergraduate and graduate students from any discipline. No previous experience or familiarity with digital humanities work is required or assumed.
 ARH 8604Field Methods I Building Archaeology
Spring 2021  10183 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed 15 / 14 (15 / 14)Alissa DiamondFr 9:00am - 11:30am Web-Based Course
 In this class, we will explore methods for critical interrogation of both archival materials and physical evidence in exploring the everyday historical landscape of Locust Grove, Virginia. Methods will be introduced alongside theoretical frames and particular approaches to both physical spaces and historical archives that center on questions of power, social categorization, and understanding interactions between economic systems and physical spaces. The class will also introduce the students to methods of digital mapping and spatial analysis, using online GIS ArcOnline tools. As a field-based course, some of our class time will be spent in the field examining, recording, and critically interrogating physical spaces. Students will be expected to apply these recording and analysis techniques that are central to the class to site within the study area on their own.
History of Art
 ARTH 1505Art and the Modern World
 Art and Technology
Spring 2021  12074 100Lecture (3 Units)Open 58 / 120Christa RobbinsMoWe 1:00pm - 1:50pm Web-Based Course
 In this introductory course in art history we will explore the intersection of art and technology (such as the history of painting’s overlap with the history of optics, the fact that advances in cybernetics—which led to the internet you know and love today—coincided with a redefinition of what art is in the form of "systems aesthetics" and conceptual art, and the multiple collaborations between artists and scientists). There are many overlaps between art and technology and, in some instances, it is very difficult to tell the two apart. Through the very task of making distinctions between the two or seeing how such distinctions were either made or erased in specific historical cases, you will gain some insight into the history of both art and technology, as well as into your own interactions with and reliance on today’s technology.
 ARTH 2052Ancient Egypt
 The world of power, cult and art in ancient Egypt
Spring 2021  11902 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 58 / 60Anastasia Dakouri-HildTuTh 9:30am - 10:45am Web-Based Course
 Survey of Egyptian art and architecture (Predynastic to the end of the New Kingdom, ca. 4000-1100 BC). The course introduces students to the great monuments and works of art of ancient Egypt, elucidates the system of beliefs that brought them about, and explains the existence and symbolic meaning of pharaonic visual culture. Moreover, the neglected ‘others’ of Egyptian society (e.g. women, cross-gendered persons, foreigners, commoners) and their material culture are brought into focus to gain a nuanced and complex understanding of ancient Egypt. The course combines art historical and archaeological perspectives. Context (both social and archaeological) is emphasized in the interpretation of artifacts and monuments.
 ARTH 2054Roman Art and Archaeology
Spring 2021  18865 100Lecture (4 Units)Open 52 / 60Dylan RogersMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 This course is intended to serve as an introduction to the artistic, architectural, and archaeological monuments of ancient Italy and its expansive Roman Empire from the founding of Rome to the end of the Roman Empire. Roman art and architecture will be traced from its early origins under Etruscan influence through the periods of the Roman Republic, Principate, and Early Christianity, using a variety of media, including monumental and domestic architecture, wall paintings, mosaics, sculpture, and coins, as well as ancient written sources. The goal of this course work is to produce a broad but varied look at Roman art and archaeology within its extended historical and cultural context, from sites throughout the ancient Mediterranean, illustrating the multicultural world the Romans inhabited.
 ARTH 2862Arts of the Buddhist World- India to Japan
Spring 2021  12630 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 22 / 30Jinchao ZhaoTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm Web-Based Course
 This class is a survey of Buddhist art and architecture from the Third Century BCE through the medieval periods. It provides an overview of art forms and concepts created primarily in the context of Buddhism across the broad geographical scope of South Asia, Central Asia, East Asia, and Southeast Asia. Organized chronologically, the course will examine the major monuments and artworks from the various Buddhist traditions, forming a panoramic view of the development and transmission of Buddhist art for the student. It also considers the aesthetic concepts, social groups, and cultural contexts associated with the artworks. This course fulfills the Non-Western Perspectives requirement.
 ARTH 2961Arts of the Islamic World
Spring 2021  12896 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 32 / 60Amanda PhillipsTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pm Minor Hall 125
 Hybrid model for teaching, TBC
 What’s Islamic about Islamic art? What makes a mosque in Indonesia different from one in Iberia? Where are all the pictures? What’s with all that ornament? Do materials matter, and can fine art be mass-produced? To answer some of these questions, we’ll be exploring big themes, such as the requirements of worship and imperial building campaigns, daily life and its objects, conventions of representation (or picture-making), the absolute triumph of calligraphy as an art form, the way Mediterranean and Oceanic trade connected different cultures, and how looting, plunder, and finally colonialism and nationalism also impact on the way we see and understand art and architecture in the twenty-first century.
 ARTH 3591Art History Colloquium
 The Garden in the Ancient Mediterranean
Spring 2021  13694 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 11 / 15Janet DunkelbargerTuTh 9:30am - 10:45am Web-Based Course
 What is a garden? This is the driving question for the course, which will introduce students to the gardens of ancient Mediterranean cultures. The course is structured thematically and draws on the literature, art, and archaeology of ancient gardens to answer that central question. We will explore the garden as a site of productivity and functionality; as a socially and politically constructed space; as a setting both for leisure and luxury and for philosophical reflection or religious encounter; and, as a place of death and desire.
 Mediterranean Art and Myth
Spring 2021  13695 002Lecture (3 Units)Closed 22 / 20Tyler Jo SmithTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 This course focuses on the mythological stories, figures, and settings of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds, including the Near East and Egypt. Works of ancient literature and art will be introduced and analyzed, as well as the theories of anthropology, religious studies, and art history. Important themes are landscape, memory, narrative, and the role of Classical myth on popular culture.
 ARTH 3595Art History Practicum
 Indigenous North American Arts
Spring 2021  19685 001PRA (3 Units)Open 2 / 12Adriana Greci GreenTu 1:00pm - 3:30pm Web-Based Course
 This course will give you an introduction to the art histories of Indigenous North American nations and cultures. You will explore the range of creativity and diversity of media, forms, and aesthetic systems of Native American and First Nations artists of the past and of artists working today.
 ARTH 4591Undergraduate Seminar in the History of Art
 Antiquity and Film
 Hollywood film and popular culture: why ancient societies matter today
Spring 2021  13703 002SEM (3 Units)Closed 12 / 12Anastasia Dakouri-HildTu 3:30pm - 6:00pm Web-Based Course
 The course explores film, in particular the historical epic genre, as a form of popular culture through the lens of which we can understand how antiquity was/is received in the 20th and 21st c. In particular, the course examines the interrelationship of film with the past as known through historical records and archaeological work and debates the rewriting of history on screen (in the form of omissions, alterations, emphases). How does the cinematography of antiquity reveal preoccupations, biases, judgments, debates, values, beliefs, moralities of modern and contemporary society? How are political, religious and other ideologies of today parsed and projected onto the past through the medium of film? Moreover, the course explores antiquity as a fruitful ground for popular imagination: why does it matter? Why do ancient stories, cities, people, events, continue to fascinate?
 Vikings into Kings
Spring 2021  19527 004SEM (3 Units)Closed 8 / 12 (13 / 12)Lisa ReillyTh 1:00pm - 3:30pm Web-Based Course
 The marauding Vikings are familiar from popular culture including the well-known tv series. Somehow they become kings who commission such extraordinary works as the Bayeux Tapestry, Durham Cathedral and the Cappella Palatina. This course will trace their transformation from raiders and traders across Europe and beyond into rulers of the wealthiest kingdoms in Europe through an exploration of their material culture. This fascinating transformation will be grappled with through discussions and a series of short writing assignments culminating in a research project. Seminar participants will learn how to organize, prepare and write a research paper. This course will fulfill the second writing requirement.
 Introduction to Research Methods
 How to go about doing research: skills-based learning
Spring 2021  20460 005SEM (3 Units)Open 9 / 12Anastasia Dakouri-HildTBA TBA
 The seminar focuses on building undergraduate research skills and research writing for papers and larger research projects (such as independent study, distinguished major thesis etc). We will cover a variety of topics, such as why research is useful and how it can be personally satisfying, designing a research project, choosing an evocative title, treating sources, writing and presenting compellingly, revising and proofing, formatting, giving and receiving peer feedback, preparing accompanying materials, and the publishing process. The course materials apply to all disciplines (not just art history), focusing on the general, meta-principles of research rather than field specifics. The course aims to help students build skills using their extant research projects as sandbox (e.g. a paper for a different course, DMP, independent study, etc.). Students build their projects according to their own research interests and individual fields.
American Sign Language
 ASL 3410Contemporary Disability Theory
Spring 2021  19312 001SEM (3 Units)Closed 14 / 18 (19 / 18)Christopher KrentzMoWeFr 12:00pm - 12:50pm Web-Based Course
 In the last several decades, thinking about people with physical, cognitive, and sensory differences has moved from a mostly pathological medical-based understanding to a more rights-based framework. In this course we will consider how conceptions of disability have changed and how these theories relate to the depiction of disabled people in literature. The syllabus is still under constructions, but we will study critical theory by writers like Goffman, Davis, Nussbaum, Siebers, Quayson, Davidson, Puar, and Erevelles; read literature such as Wells’ “The Country of the Blind,” Morrison’s Sula, Raine’s Tribes, and Sinha’s Animal’s People; and probably study a documentary film or two. Requirements include thoughtful preparation and participation, group leading of discussion, two 5-6 page papers, quizzes, and a reading journal.
Biology
 BIOL 3250Introduction to Animal Behavior
Website  11774 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 133 / 150Masashi KawasakiMoWeFr 10:00am - 10:50am Web-Based Course
 This course is about what animals do, how they do it, and why they behave the way they do. Our fascination with animal behavior is rooted in our distant ancestors because the knowledge of animal behavior had been vitally important for their survival – enjoying a dinner or becoming a dinner. Animal behavior as a modern science recruits all concepts in biology for answering the how and why questions. The first part of the course focuses on the how questions -- the proximate causes of animal behavior – neurophysiological, hormonal, and genetic operations that take place within individual animals. The following sections of the course explores the why questions – ultimate causes of animal behavior – ecological functions and evolutionary origins of animal behavior that explain why animals behave the way they do.
 BIOL 4260Cellular Mechanisms
 The Fundamental Science Behind Today's Transformative Medicines
Syllabus  11950 001Lecture (3 Units)Permission 34 / 36Mike WormingtonTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm Chemistry Bldg 217
  This is a discussion-intensive course based on: Fundamental science behind today's important medicines. Spector et al Science Translational Medicine 10: 25 April 2018. https://stm.sciencemag.org/content/10/438/eaaq1787 BIOL 3010 is not required. Preference will be given to students who have taken one or more of any of BIOL 3010, 3030, 3040, 3050, or CHEM 4420 in addition to BIOL 3000.
 BIOL 4585Selected Topics in Biology
 How Plant Biotechnology Can Save Our Planet
 How plant biotechnology could save our planet
Spring 2021  20331 001SEM (2 Units)Open 22 / 30Cristian DannaTu 3:30pm - 5:00pm Web-Based Course
 The challenge of providing food and safe water to a global population of 9 billion people by 2050 requires profound changes in crop production. Food production has kept pace with the stip increase in the human population in the past 70 years, but this came at a high cost: environmental pollution. The amount of chemical fertilizer, herbicides, and pesticides currently in use pollute soil, water, and air, making the current crop farming practices unsustainable. The use of polluting chemicals could be significantly reduced via genetic engineering of crops. This class will provide students with an integrative view of how to make use of modern DNA engineering technologies to obtain genetically modified plants (GMO) that exhibit new or improved desired characteristics. Students will be weekly exposed to the primary research literature on plant biotechnology and discussion sections that include environmental impact and GMO policy regulations.
Civil Engineering
 CE 2500Special Topics in Civil Engineering
 How to Manage Engineering & Construction Projects
Spring 2021  19686 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 12 / 30Arsalan HeydarianTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 Construction engineering and project management
 This course provides the essential aspects of the “Project lifecycle” process from the initial conception phase through the completion phase of a project. Specifically, by focusing on the Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) projects, students will be introduced to important concepts related to planning and financing a project, budgeting and scheduling, and managing and controlling a technical engineering project.
 CE 4500Special Topics in Civil Engineering
 Project Business Planning
Spring 2021  19656 001Lecture (3 Units)Open11 / 20Diana Franco DuranMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 Construction projects only occur when the needs of the market, sponsors, end-users, and society are sustainably met. In this course, students will learn how to: 1) plan successful business cases for construction projects considering technical, societal, financial, legal, environmental, and market limitations, 2) evaluate and select the best alternative, and 3) express it through a business plan while increasing their entrepreneurship competencies.
 CE 5500Special Topics in Civil Engineering
 Construction Estimating
 Construction Estimating
Website  16642 001Lecture (3 Units)Open9 / 30Matthew O'malleyTuTh 5:00pm - 6:15pm Web-Based Course
 The goal of the course is to provide students with an in-depth understanding of how a general contractor pursues, estimates, bids and procures work. The course will cover the full range of activities from conceptual estimating, to scoping and bidding projects, to the submission of proposals to the general contractor’s clients. The course will cover a variety of procurement types and the corresponding strategies that a general contractor employs in the pursuit of these procurements. Upon completion of the course, students should have a greater understanding of how 1. Construction cost estimates are organized and structured. 2. How quantity surveys are performed. 3. Where pricing data comes from and how it is analyzed and utilized. 4. The differences in types of estimates and levels of detail as the design phases advance. 5. How a general contractor estimates and submits their pricing and proposals to both public and private clients, 6. How the general contractor evaluates subcontractors, compares subcontractors’ pricing and scopes. 7. Strategies related to the submission and presentation of estimates and proposals.
Commerce
 COMM 3559New Course in Commerce
 Markets and Investing
Spring 2021  20320 001Lecture (3 Units)Open26 / 30Edward FinleyTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm Rouss Hall 410
 This course is an introduction to what financial markets are, both in terms of the types of securities that are bought and sold and why, as well as how markets function in a broader social context. Students will learn about asset classes of all types, including alternative asset classes and sophisticated financial innovations. Students will also be introduced to portfolio construction; namely how to construct portfolios for a set of goals. No prior knowledge of markets or securities is required.
 COMM 4559New Course in Commerce
 Doing Business in China
Spring 2021  20304 006Lecture (3 Units)Permission16 / 20Mark MetcalfMo 3:30pm - 6:00pm Web-Based Course
 Doing Business in China is an introduction to the PRC and sociological factors that contribute to its business practices. The role of history, geography, governance, and global standing are discussed, as well as the influence of Confucianism and Daoism. Factors such as relationships, honesty, indirection, and “face” in business and negotiations are also explored. Case studies are used to provide practical examples of Chinese business practices.
Computer Science
 CS 1110Introduction to Programming
Spring 2021  16302 003Lecture (3 Units)Open149 / 150Paul McBurneyTBA TBA
 All Sections of CS 1110 can be taken asynchronously. All lecture recordings will be uploaded and available to all sections. Additionally, lectures will be recorded synchronously over Zoom 2-3 p.m. MWF which is open to all 4 sections. Everyone will eventually be able to register for this class -- see https://www.cs.virginia.edu/~cohoon/pdf/enroll-policy.pdf for details.
 All Sections of CS 1110 can be taken asynchronously. All lecture recordings will be uploaded and available to all sections. Additionally, some lectures will be recorded synchronously 2-3 p.m. MWF which is open to all 4 sections.
 CS 3501Special Topics in Computer Science
 Foundations of Data Analysis
Website  19099 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed71 / 70 (71 / 70)Tom FletcherTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 This course is an introduction to the foundations behind modern data analysis and machine learning. The first part of the course covers selected topics from probability theory and linear algebra that are key components of modern data analysis. Next, we cover multivariate statistical techniques for dimensionality reduction, regression, and classification. Finally, we survey recent topics in machine learning, in particular, deep neural networks.
 Ethics for Computer Scientists
 Everyday Ethics and Quotidian Quandaries for Computer Scientists
Website  19868 002Lecture (3 Units)Closed 25 / 20David EvansTuTh 9:30am - 10:45am Web-Based Course
 Today most of the rules of society are interpreted and enforced by programs, and much human interaction is now mediated by computing platforms that decide what people see and who they can talk to. This gives computer scientists a disproportionate power to mold society. This course aims to increase understanding of the moral and ethical aspects of computing systems through a mix of readings and viewings, exercises and experiments, and writings, presentations, and discussions.
 CS 4414Operating Systems
Website  16450 002Lecture (3 Units)Open 60 / 140Felix LinTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pm Web-Based Course
 Goal: Experiencing modern system software. Overview: centering on four projects on real (ARM64) hardware: baremetal kernel, multicore, trusted execution, and filesystem forensics.
 Rationale: Most existing OS courses and textbooks focus on kernel designs. As new systems, such as analytics engines and trusted execution environments, become part of computing infrastructures. They are as important as kernels. They shall add to the OS curriculum. Philosophy: the course's first-class goal is to give you *experience* on software systems. While OS knowledge (e.g. "what are page tables?") is readily available from YouTube, StackOverflow, etc., the experience (e.g. "how to tinker with page tables?") can only be delivered through hands-on learning with tight feedback loops. Overview: the core parts are a series of four projects on real (ARM64) hardware: baremetal kernel, multicore, trusted execution, and filesystem forensics. To give you an idea, check out the link above.
 CS 4501Special Topics in Computer Science
 Software Logic
 Software Logic
Website  16039 001Lecture (3 Units)Open23 / 26 (23 / 26)Kevin SullivanTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm Web-Based Course
 This combined advanced undergraduate and graduate course will introduce students to constructive logic and its uses for specification and verification of programming languages and software systems, more generally. The course is open to advanced undergraduates (with at least one course in theoretical computer science: algorithms or theory of computing; or, with permission, CS 2102 as taught by Sullivan). Students will come to understand advanced functional programming, higher-order logic and interactive proof construction; and applications of these foundational elements to program specification and verification and to the formalization of mathematics. Students will learn to use the Lean Prover as a proof assistant, and will use the book, [*The Hitchhiker's Guide to Logical Verification*](https://github.com/blanchette/logical_verification_2020/blob/master/hitchhikers_guide.pdf).
 Autonomous Vehicles: Perception,Planning & Control
 F1/10 Autonomous Racing: Perception, Planning, and Control for Autonomous Driving
Website  16304 003Lecture (3 Units)Open34 / 48Madhur BehlTBA TBA
 Course Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpEVCgt18P4
 Students will work in teams to build, drive, and race 1/10th scale autonomous cars, while learning about the principles of perception, planning, and control. You will learn to use robot operating system (ROS), integrate various sensors (IMU, Cameras, LIDAR) on an embedded computer, and implement algorithms for localization, mapping, path planning, and control. The course culminates in a F1/10 a "battle of algorithms" race among the teams.
 Cryptography
Website  19972 006Lecture (3 Units)Open42 / 80Mohammad MahmoodyMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 An introduction to foundations of cryptography and security
 The goal of this course is to develop skills that allow formally (i.e., mathematically) arguing about security. This involves knowing how to define security in various settings and how to use the right theoretical tools (also known as cryptographic primitives) to design the right solutions (also called protocols) for various tasks. As a result, proofs of security would be a major part of this course.
 CS 4780Information Retrieval
 Crack the modern search engines
Website  16673 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 38 / 45 (38 / 45)Hongning WangTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 In this course, you will learn the underlying technologies of modern information retrieval systems and obtain hands-on experience by using existing toolkits to set up your own search engine system to solve real-world problems. We will disclose the secrets behind a typical search engine system to you step by step, such that you will be able to: 1. Get familiar with core search engine techniques ranging from back-end indexing, query processing and document ranking components to front-end result display, query recommendation and personalization modules; 2. Explore a specific frontier topic in information retrieval on your own and present your thoughts and ideas to your instructor and peers in panel discussions; 2. Team up with others to practice collaborative problem solving; 3. Get a sense of basic research activities: formulating a real-world problem in an abstract and mathematic way, and develop principled solutions for it; 4. Build your customized search engine for a specific domain you care about and deploy it to help others.
 CS 6316Machine Learning
Spring 2021  20122 001Lecture (3 Units)Open24 / 30 (24 / 30)Miaomiao ZhangMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 An introductory course offers a broad overview of the main techniques in machine learning. Students will study the basic concepts of advanced machine learning methods as well as their theoretical background. Topics of learning theory (i.e., VC theory); supervised learning (parametric / nonparametric methods, Bayesian models, support vector machines, neural networks); and unsupervised learning (dimensionality reduction, kernel tricks, clustering) will be covered.
 CS 6501Special Topics in Computer Science
 CPS: Formal Methods, Safety, and Security
Spring 2021  16625 002Lecture (3 Units)Open23 / 62 (23 / 62)Lu FengMoWe 5:00pm - 6:15pm Web-Based Course
 Cyber-physical systems (CPS) are smart systems that include co-engineered interacting networks of physical and computational components. Examples of CPS include medical devices, automotive cars, robots, internet of things, smart cities. Increasingly, such systems are everywhere. It becomes more and more important to assure the safety and security of CPS, since many CPS applications are safety-critical and life-critical. This course will give you the required skills to analyze the CPS that are all around us, so that when you contribute to the design of CPS, you are able to understand important safety and security aspects and feel confident designing and analyzing CPS systems. The overall goal of this course is to enable you to learn not only the fundamental knowledge of CPS and formal methods, but also important skills of creative thinking, collaborative working, and continuing learning of new techniques after the course is over. It will provide an excellent foundation for students who seek industry positions and for students interested in pursuing research.
 TBD
 Topics at the Interface of Learning and Game Theory
Website  16662 005Lecture (3 Units)Open 31 / 75Haifeng XuTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 Please see the course website link.
 Cyber Forensics: Automated Software Approaches
 CYBER FORENSICS: AUTOMATED SOFTWARE APPROACHES
Website  19082 006Lecture (3 Units)Open9 / 75Yonghwi KwonTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 Today’s computer systems are vulnerable. We have seen many high-profile cyberattacks in recent years affecting various infrastructures such as governments, factories, military, power-plants, etc. Once a system is compromised, understanding how it is compromised and what we can do about the system is particularly important. That is what this course “Cyber Forensics” is about.
 Software Logic
Website  20760 008Lecture (3 Units)Open15 / 20 (15 / 20)Kevin SullivanTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm Web-Based Course
 This combined advanced undergraduate and graduate course will introduce students to constructive logic and its uses for specification and verification of programming languages, in particular, and of software systems, more generally. These methods have proven to be exceptionally valuable in the production of high assurance systems ranging from compilers that provably generate correct assembly code to microprocessors that provably have critical correctness properties to drones that are provably immune to key classes of security attacks.
 Information Retrieval
 Crack the modern search engines
Website  20788 009Lecture (3 Units)Open27 / 30 (27 / 30)Hongning WangTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 In this course, you will learn the underlying technologies of modern information retrieval systems and obtain hands-on experience by using existing toolkits to set up your own search engine system to solve real-world problems. We will disclose the secrets behind a typical search engine system to you step by step, such that you will be able to: 1. Get familiar with core search engine techniques ranging from back-end indexing, query processing and document ranking components to front-end result display, query recommendation and personalization modules; 2. Explore a specific frontier topic in information retrieval on your own and present your thoughts and ideas to your instructor and peers in panel discussions; 2. Team up with others to practice collaborative problem solving; 3. Get a sense of basic research activities: formulating a real-world problem in an abstract and mathematic way, and develop principled solutions for it; 4. Build your customized search engine for a specific domain you care about and deploy it to help others.
 CS 7501Selected Topics in Computer Science
 Innovating for Defense
Website  16671 001Lecture (3 Units)Open2 / 8Jack DavidsonMo 3:40pm - 6:40pm Web-Based Course
 In this course, students will work on real problems facing the U.S. Department of Defense. Students will study the structures and processes of the various national security agencies and how those agencies approach the problem of innovation. For most defense institutions this is a combined problem of technology, policy, and law. Multifunctional student teams made up of students from each of the School of Engineering and Applied Science, the Batten School, the School of Law, and the College of Arts and Sciences will work together through the semester on an actual problem submitted by DoD to the class. As part of the course, student teams will prepare a series of project updates along with a draft and final project presentation.
 CS 8501Special Topics in Computer Science
 Cyber Physical Systems and the Internet of Things
 Research Seminar
Spring 2021  16648 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 16 / 30John StankovicMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 By the end of 2020, the Internet will have 30-50 billion devices attached to it. To make sense of all these devices, Cyber Physical System (CPS) principles must be employed. This class will study various research papers that have the potential to support futuristic IOT/CPS systems. The research papers are grouped into the following general categories: wireless sensing and communications including sensing through walls, machine learning and NLP, HCI, Smart Cities, and Smart Health. Best papers and highly cited papers are among the chosen papers as exemplars of good research. This class is run as a seminar where students present the papers and is targeted for graduate students interested in research in IOT and CPS. It is an in-depth class for the NSF funded NRT program, but it is open to all SEAS graduate students. Research paradigms, how to invent, techniques for invention, furthering writing and communications skills, a mock conference program committee meeting, and some hands-on experiences are also included in the class. Prerequisites: SEAS graduate student. Class Requirements: Read the papers, write summaries of designated papers, participate in class discussions, present one or more papers, and perform a final project.
Drama
 DRAM 3090Theatre and Social Change
Spring 2021  20399 001WKS (3 Units)Open 3 / 15Cortney MceniryTuTh 9:30am - 10:45am Drama Education Bldg 206
 The core of our work together will be twofold: to identify the values and worldviews that drive change-oriented artistry, and for students to identify the values and worldviews that drive their own artistry. We will interrogate the way marginalization, oppression, and inequity are dismantled and/or reified in documented and undocumented moments of theatre for social change. We will explore notions of community, artist, change, and reciprocity as we consider the importance of social identity, positionality and power in this work. We will explore common forms and poetics found in community-based and applied performance. We will briefly consider the origins of the documented field of theatre for social change in the United States, beginning in the 20th Century, recognizing that theatre has always been used as a tool for social change. Throughout the semester, the student-artists in the course will reflectively plan a project for their own self-identified communities, considering along the way the possible intentions and impacts of such an undertaking. This course is designed for you to develop your own theoretical frameworks, artistic lineage, and ethics of artistry--in community and in conversation with others. This course is for students who want to think critically about the role of art in public life and their own roles in communities. Students with any background in art-making, organizing, and/or public engagement are invited to take this course. This course is open for students in any major. You can learn more about the instructor here: https://cte.virginia.edu/staff/cortney-mceniry
Electrical and Computer Engineering
 ECE 3502Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering
 Foundations of Data Analysis
Website  19100 002Lecture (3 Units)Open10 / 30 (10 / 30)Tom FletcherTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 This course is an introduction to the foundations behind modern data analysis and machine learning. The first part of the course covers selected topics from probability theory and linear algebra that are key components of modern data analysis. Next, we cover multivariate statistical techniques for dimensionality reduction, regression, and classification. Finally, we survey recent topics in machine learning, in particular, deep neural networks.
 ECE 4501Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering
 Optical Quantum Electronics
Website  16664 001Lecture (3 Units)Open2 / 5 (2 / 5)Xu YiMoWe 11:00am - 12:15pm Web-Based Course
 Course Zoom link in Syllabus and Website URL
 Course Zoom link: https://virginia.zoom.us/j/98825441696?pwd=QmlPYi90Ym1NWDgyR0liN2Irc1FrUT09; password: quantum. Quantum electronics, the study of light and matter interaction, has become the cornerstone in many areas of optical science and technology. The course will start with reviewing the principle of lasers followed by introducing the generalized nonlinear wave equations. This course will cover typical nonlinear effects and their applications in telecommunication, ultrafast laser, quantum computing/information and chemical/bio spectroscopy.
 Matrix Analysis in Engineering and Science
Syllabus  19096 004Lecture (3 Units)Open6 / 20 (6 / 20)Gang TaoTBA TBA
 This course studies some fundamental and advanced characteristics and transformations of matrices which are the basic elements for system modeling (such as dynamic and evolving models) and algorithm development (such as adaptive and leaning schemes) in engineering and science fields. It is focused on concepts, properties and applications of general and special matrices commonly seen in the literature. Its goal is to build solid foundations of matrix analysis for students to pursue advanced study and research in their fields.
 In this senior-graduate course of Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering, students are provided the opportunities to have an in-depth study and understanding of matrix analysis concepts, algorithms, and applications, including eigenvalues and eigenvectors, linear transformation, similarity transformations, commonly used factorizations, canonical forms, Hermitian and symmetric matrices, and positive definite matrices. In addition, these concepts and theory will be illustrated by some engineering and science applications such as those in learning, control, signal processing, and optimization.
 ECE 4502Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering
 Machine Learning for Engineers
Spring 2021  20011 003Lecture (3 Units)Open0 / 10 (0 / 10)Miaomiao ZhangMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 An introductory course offers a broad overview of the main techniques in machine learning. Students will study the basic concepts of advanced machine learning methods as well as their theoretical background. Topics of learning theory (i.e., VC theory); supervised learning (parametric / nonparametric methods, Bayesian models, support vector machines, neural networks); and unsupervised learning (dimensionality reduction, kernel tricks, clustering) will be covered.
 ECE 5502Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering
 Photovoltaics
 Fundamentals of Photovoltaics and Solar Energy (ECE 5502/ECE6502)
Spring 2021  16218 001Lecture (3 Units)Open7 / 10Mool GuptaTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pm Web-Based Course
 Solar energy plays an important role in the growth of renewable energy which will have an important impact on the society to meet its energy needs and improvement of environmental quality. This course provides an introduction to Photovoltaics and solar energy generation and gives an overview on the subject. The course will describe the operation of photovoltaic cells and efficiency improvements, industrial processes, solar thermal power generation, thin films and nanomaterials for photovoltaics and future technologies.
 Hardware-Software Security
Website  16683 002Lecture (3 Units)Open14 / 25Barry JohnsonTBA TBA
 A Collab site has been created for the course, and the URL is included here.
 This course introduces an integrated hardware and software approach to design for security. The Apple iOS security approach will be used to illustrate the concepts along with other examples from industry. Topics include hardware design of cryptographic functions, hardware security modules, secure processors, identity management and access control using biometrics, Blockchain, secure manufacturing and supply chain, cybersecurity modeling, and future directions in cybersecurity.
 ECE 6501Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering
 Optical Quantum Electronics
Website  16665 001Lecture (3 Units)Open2 / 15 (2 / 15)Xu YiMoWe 11:00am - 12:15pm Web-Based Course
 Course Zoom link in Syllabus and Website URL
 Course Zoom link: https://virginia.zoom.us/j/98825441696?pwd=QmlPYi90Ym1NWDgyR0liN2Irc1FrUT09; password: quantum. Quantum electronics, the study of light and matter interaction, has become the cornerstone in many areas of optical science and technology. The course will start with reviewing the principle of lasers followed by introducing the generalized nonlinear wave equations. This course will cover typical nonlinear effects and their applications in telecommunication, ultrafast laser, quantum computing/information and chemical/bio spectroscopy.
 Optical Communication Devices
Spring 2021  16669 002Lecture (3 Units)Open6 / 20 (6 / 20)Andreas BelingTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pm Web-Based Course
 The course covers photonic devices used in today’s fiber optic communication systems from a practical point of view. Its goal is to help students understand both, principles and advanced designs, such that device operation and performance can be understood and analyzed in the context of modern communication systems. Topics include: Lasers and modulation, electro-absorption modulator, Mach-Zehnder modulator, optical amplifiers, devices for filtering and switching, optical receivers for direct and coherent detection, photonic integrated circuits, component packaging, devices for long-haul and Terabit-system.
 Matrix Analysis in Engineering and Science
Syllabus  19097 004Lecture (3 Units)Open15 / 20 (15 / 20)Gang TaoTBA TBA
 This course studies some fundamental and advanced characteristics and transformations of matrices which are the basic elements for system modeling (such as dynamic and evolving models) and algorithm development (such as adaptive and leaning schemes) in engineering and science fields. It is focused on concepts, properties and applications of general and special matrices commonly seen in the literature. Its goal is to build solid foundations of matrix analysis for students to pursue advanced study and research in their fields.
 In this senior-graduate course of Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering, students are provided the opportunities to have an in-depth study and understanding of matrix analysis concepts, algorithms, and applications, including eigenvalues and eigenvectors, linear transformation, similarity transformations, commonly used factorizations, canonical forms, Hermitian and symmetric matrices, and positive definite matrices. In addition, these concepts and theory will be illustrated by some engineering and science applications such as those in learning, control, signal processing, and optimization. Some advanced assignments will be given to the group of graduate students.
 ECE 6502Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering
 Machine Learning for Engineers
Spring 2021  19089 005Lecture (3 Units)Open12 / 20 (12 / 20)Miaomiao ZhangMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 An introductory course offers a broad overview of the main techniques in machine learning. Students will study the basic concepts of advanced machine learning methods as well as their theoretical background. Topics of learning theory (i.e., VC theory); supervised learning (parametric / nonparametric methods, Bayesian models, support vector machines, neural networks); and unsupervised learning (dimensionality reduction, kernel tricks, clustering) will be covered.
Creative Writing
 ENCW 2300Poetry Writing
 Poems About Love & Exile (Click section number for description)
Spring 2021  13256 008WKS (3 Units)Open 14 / 15Michelle GottschlichMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pm Web-Based Course
 What does it mean to live in exile? Can a terrible break-up, feelings of isolation, or living through a pandemic be considered experiences of exile? How does one still manage to find love and gratitude in exile? This semester, we will ponder these questions through the reading, writing, and sharing of poetry. We will explore how writing can connect us to one another, and to what we miss & love most. Required texts: Mary Oliver, Thirst Ross Gay, Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude Billy-Ray Belcourt, This Wound Is a World In the spirit of collaboration and connection, I will also invite students to add to our reading list favorite poems, songs, and other kinds of writing that fit our theme. This introduction to poetry writing is suited for students who have no creative writing experience, as well as students who have been writing poems for years. The books of poetry we will read are thematically rich yet easily accessible. Please take into consideration that some assigned texts address adult subject matter such as sex and violence. This is a LGBQT+ positive class, and our conversations may include issues regarding race, gender, sexuality, and class disparities. This will be an online, synchronous class via Zoom.
 ENCW 2600Fiction Writing
Spring 2021  12303 006WKS (3 Units)Closed 15 / 15Acacia JohnsonMoWeFr 1:00pm - 1:50pm Web-Based Course
 This class is an introduction to the craft and techniques of writing literary fiction. Throughout the semester, you will learn to read carefully, tune in to the world and stories around you, and develop your voice through your own writing. The class will consist primarily of readings, in-class discussions, short writing exercises, and supportive workshops, where you will submit two longer pieces of your own fiction to be reviewed by your peers.
 ENCW 3310Intermediate Poetry Writing I
 Hindsight 2020
Spring 2021  11926 001WKS (3 Units)Permission 11 / 12Kiki PetrosinoMo 2:00pm - 4:30pm Web-Based Course
 Please apply for instructor permission through SIS. This is a digital course with synchronous online meetings. Instructor Permission is required for registration. APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: Sample of student poetry (4-5 poems) to be submitted IN A SINGLE DOCUMENT by Dec. 15, to Professor Petrosino’s email address at cmp2k@virginia.edu. Submissions should include a cover sheet with name, year, email address, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting. Every effort will be made to notify students of acceptance during the week prior to the beginning of classes, or earlier if possible, so that students may finalize their schedules.
 If you have complicated feelings about the year-that-was, you’re not alone. Looking back on 2020, historians will tell a harrowing story of climate change, the coronavirus pandemic, a tense U.S. presidential election, and a raft of other events, large and small, that shaped these extraordinary twelve months. At every stage, poets of all backgrounds have worked and wept, sung and meditated, while creating art that responds, in vibrant language, to the challenges of this moment. In this online intermediate-level workshop, we’ll take a look at several exciting works of poetry published in 2020. These readings will be supplemented by the voices of journalists, podcasters, scholars, and thinkers who will help us place 2020 in context. Through class discussion, critical and creative writing exercises, and peer review (“workshop”), we’ll aim to analyze the concerns—political, personal, philosophical and aesthetic—that poets engaged over the past year. This is a digital course. Class meetings will take place synchronously on Zoom or other teleconferencing platform. Asynchronous assignments will be posted to UVA COLLAB. The semester will culminate in a Final Portfolio collecting original and final drafts of 7-10 poems, plus a Final Essay that analyzes one or more salient themes from this year in poetry.
 Notebook Poetics
Spring 2021  11927 002WKS (3 Units)Permission 11 / 12Brian TeareTu 5:00pm - 7:30pm New Cabell Hall 332
 Please apply for instructor permission through SIS; instructor permission is required for registration. APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: Work sample (4-5 poems) to be submitted IN A SINGLE DOCUMENT, preferably by Dec. 15, to Professor Teare's email address at bt5ps@virginia.edu. Submissions should include a cover sheet with name, year, email address, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting. Every effort will be made to notify students of acceptance during the week prior to the beginning of classes, or earlier if possible, so that students may finalize their schedules. Note: all literature discussions will take place in person; all workshops will take place over Zoom. Remote learning will of course also be available for all in-person meetings.
 This poetry workshop is structured around thematically focused writing, reading, and critical thinking assignments. Our readings will explore notebook poetics, a unique genre with roots in Japanese poetic diaries of the medieval period, a genre pioneered by writers as different as Sei Shonagon and Matsuo Basho. The travel journal, pillowbook, poetic diary, haibun, and zuihitsu all feed into the generic stretchiness of contemporary notebook poetics, which can incorporate haiku and free verse, found text, iPhone images, diary entries, and field notes written down while on foot, etc. As Joanne Kyger, a contemporary practitioner of notebook poetics, says, the genre is “a completely free and open form, anything and everything can go into the pages.” Together as colleagues and critics, alone as writers and readers, we’ll be keeping our own notebooks and thinking about how poets in particular use the notebook space as a site 1) for honing the skill of paying attention to the world, and 2) for catching hold of time as it passes in all its political, ecological, and autobiographical specificity. When reading, we’ll move through very different versions of notebook poetics, including work by Rick Barot, Brenda Hillman, Larry Eigner, Etel Adnan, and Kimiko Hahn. For the first three “cold-reading” workshops, we’ll turn in short poems that respond to writing prompts designed to test our powers of attention, while the final workshop portion of the course will offer each of us the chance to catch time in longer excerpts from our poetic notebooks-in-progress. Throughout the semester, in both critical discussions and workshops, we’ll discuss the conceptual, political, and poetic aspirations of the work we read, and together explore the possibilities of genre and the practices of writing, paying attention, and catching time.
 ENCW 3610Intermediate Fiction Writing
 Playing Around: Fictional Elements, Experimentation and Form
Spring 2021  11928 001WKS (3 Units)Permission 11 / 12Micheline MarcomTh 4:00pm - 6:30pm Web-Based Course
 Please submit a 4-5 page writing sample along with a paragraph detailing your previous workshop experience to mam5du@virginia.edu by January 4.
 In this course, we will read together, write new work inspired by the texts we read, share ideas, discuss literature and form, and submit two short stories for critique. Students will spend the first part of the semester reading a novella or short stories and writing a new 2-3 page creative piece in response, plus a 1 page craft response--where I encourage you to play around with style and subject matter. Everyone will have the opportunity to bring 2 longer pieces for workshopping and revision. Together we will think about the elements of fiction as we read closely. Texts will include Italo Calvino’s Cosmicomics, Clarice Lispector’s Hour of the Star, Hemingway’s Short Stories, Juan Rulfo’s story collection The Plain in Flames, Lydia Davis’ short fiction, and Isaac Babel’s Red Calvary Stories.Please submit a 5 page writing sample along with a paragraph detailing your workshop experience and why you want to take this class to mam5du@virginia.edu by January 4.
 Manners and Techniques
Spring 2021  11929 002WKS (3 Units)Permission 13 / 12Jane AlisonWe 1:00pm - 3:30pm New Cabell Hall 332
 To be considered for this class, please send a short story (up to ten pages) to me at jas2ad@virginia.edu. Attach a note telling me who and what year you are, your email address, what workshops you’ve taken, and whether you’re applying to other workshops.
 An intermediate class for imaginative students who want to expand their skills in writing literary fiction and experiment with some different manners it can take: realist stories, metafictions, fabulist tales, faux nonfictions, and so on. We’ll begin with a series of exercises to develop your narrative techniques—playing with scales of syntax; controlling time; sculpting a fictional world; manipulating readerly expectations; rendering thought—and ultimately you’ll compose and workshop two short stories or one much longer one.
 ENCW 4350Advanced Nonfiction Writing
 The Observatorium
Spring 2021  13259 001WKS (3 Units)Permission 12 / 12Jane AlisonMo 2:00pm - 4:30pm New Cabell Hall 332
 To be considered for this class, please send a piece of prose (up to ten pages) to me at jas2ad@virginia.edu. Attach a note telling me who you are, your email address, what workshops you’ve taken, and whether you’re applying to others.
 An advanced class for ambitious students who want to direct their senses fully toward the world around them, to discover both how minutely they can perceive and how expansive their vision can be. We’ll examine how other writers have cast their senses, scientific minds, beliefs, and literary bloodlines outward and then converted their perceptions into live prose. You’ll cycle through a series of micro-essays in which you’ll write about single subjects—an insect, maybe, a human face, an artifact, room, smell, or movement—drawing upon close observation and your most inventively associative mind to transform what you see into art. Working from these short pieces, you’ll develop a longer essay that will be a literary site of artful exploration.
 ENCW 4820Poetry Program Poetics
 This Is Not My Beautiful House
Spring 2021  13264 001SEM (3 Units)Permission11 / 12Kiki PetrosinoWe 2:00pm - 4:30pm Web-Based Course
 This is a digital course with synchronous online meetings.
 Where is home for you right now? Your nest, your nook, your habitat? These pandemic days have drawn many of us indoors, to the unique interiors of our lives and minds. Like a poem, a house makes room for ghosts and daydreams. A house can wall off memory or preserve a moment in time. Often, a house hides as much as it reveals; it crumbles, catches fire, and lasts forever. In this APPW seminar, we’ll look at poems that engage concepts of “home,” and use these works as inspiration for our own writing about place, space, and the imagination. As Gaston Bachelard observes, “our house is our corner of the world.” From haunted houses to grand country homes, we’ll enter many rooms of thought and expression in this seminar. Course texts in poetry will be available in a mix of print and electronic formats. About halfway through the course, students will propose a Final Creative Project on a topic of their choice, related to the course theme; the latter weeks of the semester will be reserved for workshopping the ongoing projects. This is a digital course. Class meetings will take place synchronously on Zoom or other teleconferencing platform. Asynchronous assignments will be posted to UVA COLLAB. The final grade will calculate attendance, participation, written assignments, and the Final Creative Project.
 ENCW 4830Advanced Poetry Writing I
 Poems Finding the Shapes They Need
Spring 2021  13261 001WKS (3 Units)Permission 12 / 12Debra NystromTh 2:00pm - 4:30pm Web-Based Course
 Please apply for instructor permission through SIS. This is a digital course with synchronous online meetings. Instructor Permission is required for registration. APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: Sample of student poetry (4-5 poems) to be submitted IN A SINGLE DOCUMENT to Professor Nystrom’s email address at dln8u@virginia.edu. Submissions should include a cover sheet with name, year, email address, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting. Every effort will be made to notify students of acceptance during the week prior to the beginning of classes, or earlier if possible, so that students may finalize their schedules.
 ENCW 4830 ADVANCED POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP Instructor: Debra Nystrom Restricted to Instructor Permission This workshop is for students with prior experience in writing and revising poetry. The class will involve discussion of student poems and of assigned reading, with particular attention to issues of craft. Students will be expected to write and revise six to eight poems, to participate in class discussion and offer detailed notes in response to other students’ work, to keep a poetry journal, to attend at least two poetry readings, to turn in three close-reading responses, and to participate in a group presentation. A particular focus for this class will be examining and experimenting with various formal possibilities for making poems. Poetry arose out of magic and spell, and we’ll explore the ways such effects are available to us now, as we consider received forms and their contemporary variations, including formal opportunities to be found at the liminal space between poetry and prose. In our reading we will attend to the interplay of sound, rhythm and syntax in creating suspense as well as interweaving designs whose relations are registered in subliminal ways. Students will be invited to try out different forms, but may also feel free to range beyond formal structures, for poems to find the shapes they need. Instructor Permission is required for registration. APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: Sample of student work (4-5 poems) to be submitted IN A SINGLE DOCUMENT to Professor Nystrom’s email address at dln8u@virginia.edu. Submissions should include a cover sheet with name, year, email address, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting. Every effort will be made to notify students of acceptance during the week prior to the beginning of classes, or earlier if possible, so that students may finalize their schedules.
 ENCW 4920Poetry Program Capstone
 ENCW 4920 Poetry Program Capstone
Spring 2021  13265 001SEM (3 Units)Permission10 / 10Lisa Russ SpaarFr 1:30pm - 4:00pm Web-Based Course
 Restricted to fourth-year students in the Area Program in Poetry Writing of the Department of English, the Capstone project is a semester-long investigation of faculty and student-directed, shared texts that allows advanced poetry writing students in the Area Program in Poetry Writing to begin to think beyond the single poem and into ways poetry manuscripts can be organized, to become more deeply aware of their own patterns and evolving aesthetic, and to create new work. The course involves a combination of weekly discussion of individual student manuscripts and one-on-one conferring with the instructor. After mid-term, students are assigned a graduate student mentor, who also offers the poetry manuscript a close reading. The course culminates in the production by each student of a manuscript of original poetry.
 ENCW 5310Advanced Poetry Writing II
Spring 2021  18678 001WKS (3 Units)Permission11 / 12Rita DoveTu 2:00pm - 4:30pm Web-Based Course
 Please apply for instructor permission through SIS. This is a digital course with synchronous online meetings.
 This workshop is for both graduate students (including MFA fiction students) and advanced undergraduate students with prior experience in writing and revising poetry. The class will involve discussion of student poems and of assigned reading, with particular attention to issues of craft. Students will be expected to write and revise six to eight poems, to participate in class discussion and offer detailed notes in response to other students’ work, to complete two assignments generated by writing prompts, to attend two virtual poetry readings and provide written responses, to turn in close-reading reviews of two assigned poetry books, and to complete one “wild card” assignment. Instructor permission is required for registration. APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: Sample of student work (4-5 poems) to be submitted IN A SINGLE DOCUMENT electronically in Word to Professor Dove’s email address at rfd4b@virginia.edu, preferably by Dec 15; submissions should include a cover sheet with name, year, email address, telephone number, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting.
 ENCW 7310MFA Poetry Workshop
Spring 2021  11931 001WKS (3 Units)Permission10 / 10Rita DoveMo 2:00pm - 4:30pm Web-Based Course
 Instructor permission required.
 In this graduate-level workshop, designed for MFA poets in the first two years of the program, students will continue developing their own writing practices while exploring other compositional and critical techniques. We’ll devote most class sessions to reviewing peer-generated poetry, but we’ll also discuss published works and other aspects of the creative process. We will also examine what it means to “manage” a writer’s life, with particular emphasis on writing routines as well as exploring ways to probe, massage and coax poems into revealing their secrets. Students should be prepared to participate energetically in group critique sessions in addition to polishing their own writing. All students will be required to complete one “wild card” assignment; first year MFA students will also assemble a portfolio of poetry at semester’s end.
English-Literature
 ENGL 2500Introduction to Literary Studies
 Introduction to Literary Studies
Spring 2021  13266 001SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Stephen ArataMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pm Web-Based Course
 The broad purposes of this course are to introduce you to ways of understanding texts within the discipline of literary studies and to improve your skills in critical thinking and writing. We will devote an equal amount of time (more or less) to reading lyric poetry, drama, and narrative fiction. The poems will be drawn from the last four centuries of Anglophone verse, from Shakespeare to Okot p’Bitek (and much in between). Our plays will be Wole Soyinka’s Death and the King’s Horseman and Caryl Churchill’s Love and Information. For narrative fiction, we’ll read at least one novel (to be determined later) and short fiction by Chimamanda Adichie, Yiyung Li, and Jhumpa Lahiri. In addition to regular brief writing assignments, requirements will include three 5-6 page essays. This course fulfills the Second Writing Requirement.
 ENGL 2502Masterpieces of English Literature
 Arthurian Afterlives
Spring 2021  20611 001SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Valerie VoightTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pm Web-Based Course
 This course will explore some literary lives and afterlives of King Arthur and his court. We'll examine how authors use the otherworld of chivalric romance to construct fantasies of English nationalism and confront complicated political and theological problems. As part of our quest, we'll cycle through Arthur's reincarnations in a variety of literary forms from the medieval period through the present day. Possible texts include Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, excerpts from Malory's Le Morte D'Arthur, Alfred Lord Tennyson's The Idylls of The King, T.H. White's The Once and Future King, and J.R.R. Tolkien's The Fall of Arthur. Please contact vev3fc@virginia.edu with any questions about the course.
 ENGL 2504Major Authors of American Literature
 American Hope
Spring 2021  13269 001SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Lloyd SyMoWe 5:00pm - 6:15pm Web-Based Course
 Hope has always pervaded conceptions of America. This course will investigate the intellectual, literary, and emotional traditions of hope originating in the Massachusetts Bay Colony's self-determination as a “City Upon a Hill”: the ardent belief that Americans have in themselves and their societies. But this course will also study texts that question mainstream notions of hope by pointing out their flaws, gaps, shortcomings, and nefarious purposes. Who might get excluded or ignored by hope? Why is America so invested in finding hope—especially in dismal moments like our present? How do American artists represent hope in prose, poetry, drama, and film? No experience in American studies or literature is necessary. Our texts will probably be creations of: Winthrop, Bradstreet, Franklin, Hawthorne, David Walker, Thoreau, Dickinson, Jewett, Booker T. Washington, Cather, McCullers, Bulosan, Wilder, Hansberry, Momaday, and Ang Lee. This course fulfills the college’s second writing requirement. Course assignments: a shorter paper, a longer paper, a reading journal, a final exam, a presentation. Reading is the most important thing.
 ENGL 2506Studies in Poetry
 Defending Poetry
Spring 2021  13381 003SEM (3 Units)Open 15 / 18Samuel WalkerTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pm New Cabell Hall 323
 Plato famously banished poets from his ideal republic, denouncing poetry’s distance from truth and reason. This course will explore how poets across time have defended their art against this and other charges. We will try to understand how poetry works, how poems make music and meaning, through the lens of poetry’s value. Defenses of poetry - prose works that describe the merits of the artform and its role in society - will constitute roughly half of our reading. Alongside each defense, we will consider a handful of contemporaneous poems. While the second half of the course will be largely populated with modern and contemporary poets, we will spend several weeks discussing earlier defenses and poems, and this course is well suited for students who want to explore several periods of poetry in English. Guiding questions include: How does poetry instruct us, and how does it give us delight? How has the role of poetry changed over the centuries? What role does poetry play in our present moment? What is the relationship between political action and poetic making? What forms of knowledge are unique to poetry?
 Lyric and Short Forms
Spring 2021  19982 004SEM (3 Units)Open 15 / 18Matthew DavisTuTh 9:30am - 10:45am Web-Based Course
 (for a description, click on 19982 on the left)
 ENGL 2506 Studies in Poetry: Lyric and Short Forms Mr. Matthew Davis Spring 2021 This course is an introduction to poetry for students who have little or no previous experience reading poetry. We will study a handful of English and American poets who wrote accentual-syllabic verse in the past 400 years. Our focus will be on short lyric poems and sonnets, and we will (probably) study the following poets: Robert Frost, Thomas Hardy, Robert Herrick, W. B. Yeats, and Emily Dickinson. I will make an effort to arrange the material from easiest to hardest. Students will learn techniques for making sense of poetry and practice “scanning” poems (marking stressed and unstressed syllables) using the For Better for Verse website. Students will also write two or three short essays and memorize a sonnet. Because of Covid-19, this may turn out to be an online course with Zoom meetings. Whether or not the class is online, I intend to use the cooperative annotation tool Perusall for asynchronous reading and discussion of poems.
 ENGL 2507Studies in Drama
 Identity, Race, and Religion in Renaissance Drama
Spring 2021  13272 001SEM (3 Units)Open 17 / 18Adriana StreiferTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm Web-Based Course
 How can Hamlet help us understand the origins of current beliefs about identity and individuality? What can we learn from Othello and The Merchant of Venice about Renaissance understandings of race and religion? And how can both plays help us make sense of contemporary expressions of racism and antisemitism? In this course, we will study the theater of the English Renaissance in order to help us understand where our own ideas about identity come from. We live in an era marked by fierce debates about race, religion, nationalism, gender, and sexuality, but these topics were equally pressing (though in different ways) to authors such as Shakespeare and Marlowe, and to their audiences. Our goal is to step outside of ourselves and engage in imaginative time travel, so that we may understand how race, religion, and identity were and are culturally constructed, both in their time, and in our own. As we read, we will ask ourselves: What makes stage characters seem like “real” people to us? How do marginalized figures in drama "speak out" against dominant narratives? As values and social norms change over time, how have scholars, directors, actors, and students responded to, reclaimed, and reinterpreted literature that many argue contains racist and prejudiced elements? Throughout the course, we will grapple with these questions, and with others that enable us to consider how early modern dramatic texts articulate many divergent ideas about selfhood and identity.
 Plays and Performance Texts of the 21st Century
 Plays and Performance Texts of the 21st Century
Spring 2021  13273 002SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Anna Martin-BeecherTuTh 5:00pm - 6:15pm Contact Department
 In this course you’ll discover and analyse a broad, exciting range of contemporary plays and performance texts and explore questions including: What exactly is theatre? How does writing for the stage differ from other literatures? How are modern writers and makers developing and departing from theatrical tradition? What makes a play/performance text ‘work’? With a focus on British and American theatre of the last two decades, we’ll study plays including Annie Baker’s The Flick and Duncan Macmillan’s People, Places and Things, as well as collaboratively written texts and work that sits on the boundary between play and performance art, from artists such as Bryony Kimmings and Geoff Sobelle. This course is for anyone seeking to understand writing for the stage and expand their knowledge of the kind of theatre being created today. It may also be of interest to aspiring playwrights, directors and performers. Assessment will be based on reading responses, class discussion, presentations, essays and examination.
 ENGL 2508Studies in Fiction
 Future Shock!
Spring 2021  13274 001SEM (3 Units)Open 17 / 18Patricia SullivanMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pm Web-Based Course
 Fulfills SWR/WE requirement.
 In this course, we will read novels, particularly science fiction and speculative fiction that imagine futures, some near and quite believable, others quite far away and fantastical. How do these novels help us explore our fears and desires about the future, as well as critically reflect on our past and present? The novels we read might address issues such as future societies (dystopias or utopias), the fate of the earth (climate fiction), the changing nature of the human and artificial intelligence, animal rights, robot revolutions, the internet and what comes after, space travel, Afrofuturism and more. In addition to considering the genres of science fiction and speculative fiction, we will also practice close reading strategies; reflect on acts of interpretation through brief references to critical essays; inquire into some of the functions and effects of narratives, and grapple with imaginative representations of worlds and times similar and not so similar to our own. Students will write regular reading responses, lead discussions, write two essays, and take a final exam.
 Displacement and Migration
 Displacement and Migration
Spring 2021  13275 002SEM (3 Units)Open 16 / 18David CoyocaTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pm Web-Based Course
 In this course we will analyze contemporary Asian-American, African-American, Indigenous, and Latinx novels about displacement, (im)migration, and settlement. Through comparative analysis, we will discuss the various intersections between and divergences among these texts, paying particular attention to the shared histories the texts evidence. Our goal is to form interpretive arguments that address the ways in which the texts negotiate ideas about the nation, nation building, and national belonging.
 ENGL 2527Shakespeare
 Civic Shakespeare
Spring 2021  19774 003SEM (3 Units)Open 7 / 18Emelye KeyserTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pm Dell 2 103
 According to many an English teacher, Shakespeare can teach us a lot about being a star-crossed lover, a philosophical mama's boy, a tyrant bent on revenge. What about being an active civic participant? Shakespeare wrote at a time when the concept of "citizen" was very different to our own, but many of his plays carefully consider what it means to be politically active in conflict situations. What's more, from the moment that the ink dried on the pages, Shakespeare's plays have been performed, rewritten, quoted, and alluded to by some of the most important figures in history who advocated for political change.  In this class, we'll look closely at Shakespeare’s own socio-political context, but we’ll also discuss what Shakespeare has to say about perennial questions that still face us: what role should populism have in politics? When should regular people rise up against their government? And why do we find echoes of Shakespearean language in conversations about colonialism, anti-colonialism, suffrage, and civil rights around the world? Expect to read four Shakespeare plays, including Coriolanus and Hamlet, as well as international play adaptations, political speeches, and constitutions from the 17th--20th centuries.
 ENGL 2599Special Topics
 Uncovering 19th- & 20th-C British Writers of Color
 Uncovering 19th- and 20th-Century British Writers of Color (Click course number for description)
Spring 2021  13284 001SEM (3 Units)Open 11 / 18Indu OhriMoWeFr 9:00am - 9:50am Web-Based Course
 In your high school English classes, I am sure you heard of and read books by Victorian and Modernist English authors like Charles Dickens, Charlotte Brontë, and Virginia Woolf. But have you heard of Mary Prince (the author of a famous British slave narrative), Rabindranath Tagore (the first Asian winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature), or Lafcadio Hearn (the most famous “interpreter” of Japan for the West)? This class will invite you to learn more about the lives and writings of these fascinating non-Western Victorian and Modernist writers by metaphorically visiting different parts of the British empire. During your global voyage, you will read British writers of color from the Caribbean, Asia, and Africa, who wrote about their experiences living under imperial rule in published novels, essays, and poetry. You will look at the counternarratives these authors produced, in which they explore encounters with the English from the perspective of the Other. Along the way, you will join in the recent calls to “undiscipline” Victorian and Modernist studies by studying, researching, writing about the literature and theory of British people of color. Besides reading these authors, you will examine literary criticism that discusses the need to diversify scholarship and college curriculums to be more inclusive and embrace the voices of non-Western writers. In this course, you will uncover a rich literary tradition and make a significant contribution to this emerging scholarly conversation in Victorian and Modernist studies. Toward the end of our global journey, you will possibly collaborate with scholars to “undiscipline” Victorian studies for students, academics, and others. Tentative authors include Mary Prince, Mary Seacole, Joseph Conrad, Rabindranath Tagore, Sarojini Naidu, Lafcadio Hearn, Setsuko Koizumi, Chinua Achebe, and others. 
 Food in Literature
Spring 2021  13285 002SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Sarah StephensonTuTh 9:30am - 10:45am Web-Based Course
 Which fork do I use anyway, and why does it matter? What can you tell about me by looking at my lunch? “You are what you eat”—is that really true? How do meals, both in the literature we read and the lives we live, reflect, perpetuate, resist, and redefine cultural values, political leanings, gender roles, and race relations? We will explore these questions, and many more! Using different types of writing, including journal entries, online forum posts, in-class exercises, peer reviews, and formal essays, we consider the ways in which depictions of food in novels, poems, short stories, and film affect how we understand power relationships, cultural difference, memory, family, and host of other topics. Texts are not limited to but will include To the Lighthouse (Virginia Woolf), The Bluest Eye (Toni Morrison), and “Fish Cheeks” (Amy Tan), as well as poetry poetry by Li-Young Li, Seamus Heaney, and Sylvia Plath, among others.
 The World Wars in European Literature
Spring 2021  14084 005SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Sarah ColeMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pm Web-Based Course
 The First and Second World Wars transformed European culture and challenged poets, novelists, and filmmakers. Why create art in a time a mass violence and upheaval? How could a poem, film, or literary narrative do justice to the raw experience of war? In this course, we will explore a diverse group of responses from authors in Britain, France, and Germany, ranging from the gritty realism of Remarque’s All Quiet on the Western Front to the elegant modernism of Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway. We will pay equal attention to literary techniques and social identities, examining questions of gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and disability in war literature. The seminar will emphasize close reading, active participation, and analytical writing. Requirements include three essays, an in-class presentation, and weekly discussion questions. Among our main texts will be poems by Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon, and Paul Celan; novels by Virginia Woolf, Erich Maria Remarque, and Irene Nemirovsky; memoirs by Vera Brittain and Elie Wiesel; and films by Jean Renoir and Louis Malle.
 Nature and Romanticism
Spring 2021  19701 007SEM (3 Units)Open 15 / 18Jon D'ErricoMoWeFr 11:00am - 11:50am Web-Based Course
 In our reading, discussions, and writing this semester, we will explore the development of a modern view of "nature" and "natural" in the transatlantic English-language tradition, especially as connected to how these artists think of human nature. Our readings will include some of the expected ports-of-call for this sort of voyage (Wordsworth, Keats, Shelley, Emerson, Thoreau, and their cultural heirs), but the texts will range widely, including not only short fiction, poetry, novels, essays, and drama, but also some song lyrics, diary entries, film excerpts, and side trips into the visual arts. The class satisfies the second writing requirement, and it is appropriate for students considering declaring a major (or minor) in English, as well as for smart and motivated non-majors looking to sharpen already solid writing skills.
 Medieval Worldbuilders
Spring 2021  19757 008SEM (3 Units)Open 9 / 18DeVan ArdTuTh 5:00pm - 6:15pm Dell 2 100
 What happens when we read or watch a film about an imaginary world? How are these worlds put together? What makes them convincing, vivid, and memorable? And why have so many great modern worldbuilders – authors such as J. R. R. Tolkien and C. S. Lewis – been scholars of medieval English literature? This course considers the creation of new, fantastic worlds in the Middle Ages. We will learn and practice the basics of literary analysis by exploring several major works of medieval fiction — some of it in the original Middle English! — in which poets forge robust, intricate, and immersive environments; real-as-life characters and fauna; and swashbuckling quests. We will also look at medieval mappae mundi such as the Ebstorf map, read stories of Jewish, Muslim, and Christian pilgrims to the Holy Land, and think about critical categories such as race, nationhood, and identity. What we’ll read: * Chaucer, HOUSE OF FAME * SIR GAWAIN AND THE GREEN KNIGHT * De Pizan, BOOK OF THE CITY OF LADIES * MANDEVILLE'S TRAVELS * More, UTOPIA Beginners and advanced students alike will find something to love in this course. Assignments will include some combination of short papers, a presentation, and/or a worldbuilding project.
 Experiments in Collective Authorship
 Exquisite Corpses: Experiments in collective authorship
Spring 2021  19759 010SEM (3 Units)Open 8 / 18Piers GellyMoWe 5:00pm - 6:15pm Clark Hall 101
 In this course, we will examine various texts (novels, films, songs, performance art pieces, political documents) that were created by more than one person. We will ask whether it’s possible to create an artwork that is really and truly a collective production, and we will consider what might be gained from artworks that are the product of more than one brain. We will also ask larger questions about authorship and democracy: What is an author? What does it mean to have a voice? In what ways does the past speak through us? How might we create a society in which all are truly heard? Texts may include: NICK AND NORAH’S INFINITE PLAYLIST, by Rachel Cohn & David Levithan; A NEST OF NINNIES, by John Ashbery & James Schuyler; VERA & LINUS, by Jesse Ball & Thordis Bjornsdottir; CAVERNS, by O U. Levon; THE EPIC OF GILGAMESH; THE ARABIAN NIGHTS; A THOUSAND PLATEAUS, by Gilles Deleuze & Félix Guattari; “Theater Piece No. 1,” by John Cage; GRAPEFRUIT, by Yoko Ono; MYSTERIOUS OBJECT AT NOON, by Apichatpong Weerasethakul; THE WHITE ALBUM, by Weezer; DONUTS, by J Dilla; COSMOGRAMMA, by Flying Lotus; A SEAT AT THE TABLE, by Solange; “The Combahee River Collective Statement,” by the Combahee River Collective; CITIZENS UNITED V. FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION, by the Supreme Court of the United States
 Versions of Emily Dickinson
 ---> nb: this class will meet synchronously *only once a week, on Tuesdays*
Spring 2021  19762 013SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Sarah StortiTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pm Web-Based Course
 In recent years, Emily Dickinson has been the subject of several films and a popular tv series—they present conflicting portraits of the poet as lonely recluse, passionate lover, and radical young artist. Scholars meanwhile are engaged in an impassioned debate about how her work should be interpreted, edited, and read. In this class we will attend closely to the incredible poems and letters of Emily Dickinson in an effort to understand why she remains so compelling (and controversial) more than one hundred years after her death. We’ll also consider formal matters (how does one read a lyric poem? what’s with the dashes?), textuality (editorial issues including textual variants, manuscripts, and her groupings of poems), and some works by Dickinson’s contemporaries. Finally, the course will propose that we think of Dickinson as a resource in times of trouble. You may already know that she wrote her poems in a kind of voluntary quarantine, and that she chose to be physically (though not, as we’ll see, textually) distant from others for much of her life. I hope that as we investigate her brilliant work, we might also learn a bit about how to cope in our own difficult historical moment.
 Versions of Emily Dickinson
 ---> nb: this class will meet synchronously *only once a week, on Tuesdays*
Spring 2021  19763 014SEM (3 Units)Open 12 / 18Sarah StortiTuTh 5:00pm - 6:15pm Web-Based Course
 In recent years, Emily Dickinson has been the subject of several films and a popular tv series—they present conflicting portraits of the poet as lonely recluse, passionate lover, and radical young artist. Scholars meanwhile are engaged in an impassioned debate about how her work should be interpreted, edited, and read. In this class we will attend closely to the incredible poems and letters of Emily Dickinson in an effort to understand why she remains so compelling (and controversial) more than one hundred years after her death. We’ll also consider formal matters (how does one read a lyric poem? what’s with the dashes?), textuality (editorial issues including textual variants, manuscripts, and her groupings of poems), and some works by Dickinson’s contemporaries. Finally, the course will propose that we think of Dickinson as a resource in times of trouble. You may already know that she wrote her poems in a kind of voluntary quarantine, and that she chose to be physically (though not, as we’ll see, textually) distant from others for much of her life. I hope that as we investigate her brilliant work, we might also learn a bit about how to cope in our own difficult historical moment.
 Childhood Memory in Literature
 This course fulfills the Second Writing Requirement. Click course number on left for description.
Spring 2021  19768 015SEM (3 Units)Closed 19 / 18Jessica WalkerTuTh 5:00pm - 6:15pm Clark Hall 102
 Please email Jessica Walker at jmw9x@virginia.edu if you have questions about this class.
 Childhood memory. Why does it burn so bright? Scar so deep? How does it influence the way we tell our stories and our understanding of self? How does recollection of formative years vary in fiction versus nonfiction? In what ways can writing about childhood contend with the sensory, the sexual, the adult world, trauma, family, the power of place? In this course we will look at a variety of prose works and a few films to examine the role of childhood memory in literature. No background in literature needed. If you have a childhood and a memory you are qualified to take this course. THIS COURSE FULFILLS THE SECOND WRITING REQUIREMENT Readings will include works such as: Selections from Swann's Way by Marcel Proust, Speak, Memory by Vladimir Nabokov and The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner Novels: Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro The Sea by John Banville Corregidora by Gayl Jones Novella: The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie by Muriel Spark Memoir: Little Failure by Gary Shteyngart Short stories and essays by writers such as Joyce Carol Oates, Kiese Laymon, Junot Diaz, Alice Munro, Z.Z. Packer, John Edgar Wideman, and Louise Erdrich.
 Inventing Selves, Inventing Others
Spring 2021  19771 016SEM (3 Units)Open 10 / 18Wei LiuMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 Inventing Selves, Inventing Others Designed for beginners and non-majors, this course offers a brief survey of twentieth-century English-language literatures through the lens of self-fashioning and the interactions between self and other. Since the turn of the twentieth century, writers have developed new ways of representing the self by renovating poetic voices and narrative points of view. Identity formation and cross-cultural encounter have been among their major preoccupations. They have worried about artistic ideals that put individuality at risk and inflict gender and racial violence, colonial legacies that perpetuate cultural hierarchies in the age of globalization, cosmopolitan impulses that clash with private concerns and indigenous customs, etc. Through close textual analysis, we will enhance our understanding of literary forms and rethink literature’s political and ethical significance in the modern world. This course fulfills the second writing requirement. Reading list (tentative): T.S. Eliot, James Joyce, Joseph Conrad, Virginia Woolf, Vladimir Nabokov, John Ashbery, Sylvia Plath, Maxine Hong Kingston, Derek Walcott, Wole Soyinka, Agha Shahid Ali, Kazuo Ishiguro Requirements: participation, discussion posts, one close reading exercise, two critical essays, and a final exam.
 The Southern Short Story
Spring 2021  19772 017SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Heidi SiegristTuTh 5:00pm - 6:15pm Web-Based Course
 What is it we’re talking about when we talk about “Southern” literature and culture? This class will tackle that thorny question through the short story form, in texts spanning from the early 20th century to the present. We’ll explore historical memory, regionalism and nationalism, and geographies of race, gender, and sexuality. In addition to short stories, we’ll examine other cultural texts, from manifestos to music videos to cookbooks. Tentative reading list: Dorothy Allison, Truman Capote, William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Randall Kenan, Flannery O’Connor, Peter Taylor, Monique Truong, Alice Walker
 Literature and Inequality
 Literature and Inequality
Spring 2021  20121 021SEM (3 Units)Open 9 / 18Michael VanHooseTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 This course follows the long shadow that economic inequality casts over British literature written between 1750–1860. These years produced obscene extremes of wealth and want: country houses and balls straight out of a Jane Austen novel for some, but for others urban squalor that can only be described as Dickensian. Armed with select readings in history, economics, and literary theory, we’ll investigate literary texts as sites of encounter between rich and poor, leisured and laboring, titled and disenfranchised. Fiction will take up much of the course reading. We’ll pace ourselves reading Dickens’s Bleak House in serialized parts, as its original audience did (albeit at an accelerated pace), and we’ll also read novels by Jane Austen, Maria Edgeworth, and George Eliot. Other readings will include poetry by and about the working class, ephemeral street literature, and excerpts from the political economy of Smith, Marx and Engels, and Thomas Piketty. The course serves as an introduction to the English major, and it also satisfies the second writing requirement. Over the semester, you’ll write three formal essays—a close reading, a critical conversation essay, and an original research paper—as well as few informal writing assignments and a final exam. The course places emphasis on class participation, peer review, and revision.
 ENGL 2910Point of View Journalism
Spring 2021  19985 001SEM (3 Units)Closed 13 / 0 (23 / 0)Lisa GoffTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pm Web-Based Course
 No waitlist, but spots often open up--email the instructor at lg6t@virginia.edu.
 This course examines the history and practice of “point-of-view” journalism, a controversial but credible alternative to the dominant model of “objectivity” on the part of the news media. Not to be confused with “fake news,” point-of-view journalism has a history as long as the nation’s, from Tom Paine and Benjamin Franklin in the eighteenth century to "muckrakers" like Ida B. Wells Barnett and Ida Tarbell at the end of the nineteenth, and “New Journalism” practitioners like Tom Wolfe, Hunter Thompson, and Barbara Ehrenreich in the twentieth. Twenty-first century point-of-view practitioners include news organizations on the right (Fox News, Breitbart News Network) and left (Vice, Jacobin, MSNBC, Democracy Now), as well as prominent voices like Ta-Nehisi Coates, Rebecca Solnit, Jia Tolentino, and Sarah Smarsh. We will also consider the rise of “fake news.” A term formerly used to indicate the work of entertainers such as Jon Stewart and Steven Colbert, who pilloried the news (and newsmakers) in order to interpret them, “fake news” is now an established practice of the far right, as well as a political slur used to denigrate the work of mainstream (center and left-of-center) news organizations.
 ENGL 3002History of Literatures in English II
Spring 2021  10379 100Lecture (3 Units)Open 189 / 240John O'Brien+1MoWe 11:00am - 11:50am Web-Based Course
 Lectures will be synchronous, as will section meetings.
 William Wordsworth, Toni Morrison, Charles Dickens, Edgar Allan Poe, Virginia Woolf, Oscar Wilde, Emily Dickinson, James Joyce, Zora Neale Hurston, T. S. Eliot: these are some—but not all— of the authors we will be reading and studying together. This class will survey literature in English from around 1800 to the present moment. We will start with the emergence of Romanticism at the beginning of the nineteenth century and trace the emergence of English as a global language and literature in our post-colonial world. Our itinerary will include stops in Britain, the United States, Africa, the Caribbean, and India. This course is part of the two-semester sequence of the history of literature in English (along with ENGL 3001) that is required of English majors, but is open to anyone interested in exploring some of the most significant works of literature of the last two-plus centuries. You do not need to have taken ENGL 3001 first; the courses can be completed in any order that works best for you.
 ENGL 3273Shakespeare: Tragedies and Romances
 Some great tragedies, two stunning "late plays," poetry, passion, peril, pathos, performance.
Spring 2021  19808 100Lecture (3 Units)Open 76 / 90Clare KinneyMoWe 10:00am - 10:50am Web-Based Course
 Lectures are asynchronous (will be made available before the official meeting time); sections will meet on zoom in real time. First year students and non majors are welcome!
 A survey of the second half of Shakespeare's career: the major tragedies and the late plays (the so-called “romances”). Among the things we’ll be looking at: genre, gender, and performance; the power of love and the love of power in tragic and tragi-comic universes; alienation, transgression, “tragic knowledge”––and writing beyond tragedy. Plays we’ll read: Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra, The Winter’s Tale, The Tempest.
 ENGL 3310Eighteenth-Century Women Writers
Spring 2021  13299 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 29 / 30Alison HurleyTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm Web-Based Course
 During the eighteenth century, social, economic, and technological developments in Britain converged to alter the ways in which texts were produced and consumed. The result of these innovations was a print culture that offered women the opportunity to step onto the public stage as professional authors for the first time. Female authors, nevertheless, remained intensely aware of their “delicate situation” within the literary public sphere. They responded to this situation by deploying a variety of authorial strategies that ingeniously combined self-promotion with self-protection in order to legitimize their appearance in print. This class will be particularly interested in examining the relationship between gender and genre in eighteenth century Britain. Our readings will highlight a series of specific literary forms – letters, drama, poetry, and the novel – each of which implicates gender in distinctive and compelling ways. Class requirements include semiweekly (i.e. one for each class meeting) discussion thread posts; two thesis-driven essays; a poetry annotation assignment; and an essay-based final exam. Our class meetings will promote discussion and student participation and as much as possible. Although this is a web-based course, I am hoping to be able to hold in-person office hours and perhaps optional small-group discussion opportunities if interest and space allow.
 ENGL 3321English Literature of the Late Eighteenth Century
 Remember Travelling?!
Spring 2021  19979 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 17 / 22Cynthia WallMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pm Chemistry Bldg 206
 By the second half of the eighteenth century, the British were virtually zooming (and I mean that literally, not in todayspeak) around their island and the world. Improvements in roads and coaches, expanded trade routes, scientific sea voyages, and the ambitions of empire meant more people travelling more easily both at home and abroad, visiting other houses, other cities, and other cultures, and writing about it. They were equally interested in the wonders of their own backyard. We will explore the rhetorics of discovery (and remember what it means to travel to other places! to see people outside our bubble! to live beyond Zoomworld! ) in letters, diaries, journals, biographies, travel narratives, country house guides, ship’s logs, poems, plays, and novels, reading works by James Boswell, Frances Burney, Mary Delany, Jane Austen, Humphry Repton, William Cowper, Gilbert White, Samuel Johnson, Olaudah Equiano, Lord Chesterfield, Matthew Lewis, William Bligh, and Captain Cook. One short paper (25%), one midterm (25%), a group presentation (20%), biweekly commentaries (5%), and a final exam (20%), part take-home and part in-class. Attendance is required and participation expected (5%).
 ENGL 3482The Fiction of Empire
Spring 2021  13301 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 24 / 30Paul CantorMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pm Web-Based Course
 This course deals with the interplay between literature and British imperialism in the late nineteenth century. Topics covered include orientalism and the representation of the foreign, the ideology of imperialism, literary critiques of imperialism, the impact of imperialism on domestic life in Britain, the problem of heroism on the imperial frontier, the intersection between fiction of empire and other genres (such as science fiction, horror stories, and detective fiction), as well as the relationship between late Victorian popular culture and serious fiction, especially the emergence of literary modernism out of fiction of empire. Authors studied include Rider Haggard, Rudyard Kipling, Jules Verne, Mark Twain, Robert Louis Stevenson, H. G. Wells, and Arthur Conan Doyle. Course requirements include two short papers and a final examination.
 ENGL 3500Studies in English Literature
 Hacking for Humanists
Spring 2021  13302 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 16 / 30Brad PasanekMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 This is a course for English majors (and other students) that introduces the basics of computer programming, text analysis, text encoding, and statistics as experimental methodologies that promote new kinds of reading and interpretation. The aim is to move from "computation into criticism." We’ll work, primarily, with a Shakespeare play, poetry by William Blake, and a Jane Austen novel. Students will find these works at the bookstore alongside manuals for Text Analysis with R. No prior familiarity with coding or the language R required: we’ll be moving slowly, covering the basics. Advanced Computer Science majors will not be turned away, but they will be required to recite poetry aloud in front of their peers and show an interest in Emma Woodhouse’s misprisions.
 ENGL 3510Studies in Medieval Literature
 Thomas Malory's King Arthur
 Thomas Malory's King Arthur
Spring 2021  19777 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed 33 / 30Elizabeth FowlerTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 We’ll explore Le Morte Darthur, the spell-binding compendium of stories about King Arthur's round table, Sir Lancelot’s heroism, and Lady Guenevere’s passion. It’s the most influential early prose fiction in English, one that still produces imitations, sequels, and prequels in every medium known to art. Writing a century after Chaucer and a century before Shakespeare, the addictive Malory is curiously dry, full of terse, flat statements of shocking, magical, moving acts. We'll puzzle over what makes the book tick: narrative, imagery, style, politics. We’ll have five quizzes and some flash writing sprees and two short (~5-page) creative projects or papers (writers, artists, architects, and game developers: feel welcome to develop your skills!).
 ENGL 3540Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature
 Dangerous Women
Spring 2021  13303 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed 31 / 30Cristina GriffinTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pm Web-Based Course
 When the phrase “nasty woman” rose to the forefront of our cultural discourse, the label rested on a long-standing conception that women can be dangerous just by being women. In this class, we will look at the particular formations of dangerous women that materialized in the nineteenth century, an era in which women simultaneously remained held down by the law and yet unbound by newly possible social roles. Across texts by Jane Austen, Mary Prince, Christina Rossetti, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, George Eliot, George Bernard Shaw, and Thomas Hardy, among others, we will consider what precisely made women dangerous as well as the other side of the coin: what put women in danger? What forms of female agency, sexuality, or sociability generate power and which engender fear? And what do we make of men’s roles: what does it look like to be a dangerous man or a man in danger? How do nineteenth-century notions of danger reify a gender binary and what are the ways in which this binary breaks down or becomes fluid? By reading texts across genres——some novels, short stories, poems, essays, and a play——we will immerse ourselves in the particular history of gender, fear, and power articulated by nineteenth-century writers while also avidly seeking out points of connection between these Victorian conceptions of dangerous women and those of our own twenty-first century. Students in this course are forewarned that they will be in danger of reading dangerously fascinating texts, and will be expected to generate dangerously fascinating ideas in response.
 ENGL 3559New Course in English Literature
 Pursuing Happiness
 Pursuing Happiness
Spring 2021  20461 002Lecture (3 Units)Permission 10 / 20 (10 / 20)Lorna MartensTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
  Pursuing Happiness Fictions of happiness pursued--and found! Through the ages, people have sought happiness and formulated conceptions of what happiness means. Happiness could be something we once had--then lost--but might find again; something we might achieve by acting wisely or performing meritorious deeds; something possible through escape; alternatively, something available in the here and now; bound up with love or recognition from others; or a byproduct of creativity, independent of others. This course is not a self-help course. Don’t take it expecting to find the key to happiness. This is a literature course. We’ll read fiction, poetry, theory. But we will read some cheerful and uplifting (or at least moderately cheerful or uplifting) literature, as an intellectual antidote to the gloom and doom of the current pandemic, while we wait for a scientific antidote. Texts to be chosen from Chrétien, Rousseau, Schiller, Novalis, Wordsworth, Emerson, Valéry, Hunt, Rilke, Hilton, Stevens, Giono, Nabokov, I. Grekova, Wolf.
 ENGL 3560Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature
 Currents in African Literature
Spring 2021  13304 001Lecture (3 Units)Open5 / 24 (18 / 24)Njelle HamiltonTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm Web-Based Course
 This undergraduate seminar on contemporary African Literature takes the form of an in-depth study of the literary works of two brilliant, prolific young Nigerian women writers: feminist and social realist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and African-futurist Nnedi Okorafor, two of the most globally well-known and -loved authors the continent has produced. Through close analysis of their novels and other writings we will consider broad questions such as: How applicable are Western feminist theories to non-Western experiences? How are traditional literary forms such as the bildungsroman subverted by race, gender, and postcoloniality? How do sociopolitical realities inform literary expression? How does trauma affect narrative? How is Nigeria depicted in international news in contrast to how locals perceive and narrate their own reality? And how can these novels help us understand the contemporary African novel within the contexts of larger historical and cultural forces, events, and movements? Beyond the ultimate goal of affording you a deeper appreciation for African and Nigerian literature, history, and current events, this course aims to lead you through the process of crafting a sophisticated argument and writing about literary texts in their cultural and historical contexts. Assignments include: short essays comparing both authors, a weekly African News forum, group research and presentation on Nigerian history, and a final contemplative essay.
 Modern and Contemporary Poetry
 MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY POETRY
Spring 2021  19820 003Lecture (3 Units)Open28 / 30Mark EdmundsonTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pm Web-Based Course
 Modern and Contemporary Poetry ENGL 3 – The mid-twentieth century in America sees and explosion of great poetry. More different kinds of consequential poets, more different sorts of poems than the nation had seen before. We’ll start with the understated genius, Elizabeth Bishop, and move on to Robert Lowell, inspired early prophet of the sorrows and woes of the American empire. Then on to others: the daring, ever fertile Sylvia Plath; superb political and erotic poet, Adrienne Rich; Robert Hayden, poet of African American sorrows and hopes; Allen Ginsberg, author of nation-shaking Howl. Engagements too with the skillful, sharp Gwendolyn Brooks; visionary Amy Clampitt; Southern sage James Dickey; James Merrill, perhaps America’s most sophisticated poet; gritty, tender James Wright; and the vastly influential John Ashbery, Closer to the present, we’ll check in with America’s two most recent Nobel Prize winners, Bob Dylan and Louise Glück.
 Kafka and His Doubles
Spring 2021  19823 004Lecture (3 Units)Permission14 / 20 (15 / 20)Lorna MartensTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm Web-Based Course
 The course will introduce the enigmatic work of Franz Kafka: stories including "The Judgment," "The Metamorphosis," "A Country Doctor," "A Report to an Academy," "A Hunger Artist," "The Burrow," and "Josephine the Singer, or the Mouse Folk"; one of his three unpublished novels (The Trial); the Letter to His Father; and some short parables. But we will also look at Kafka's "doubles": the literary tradition he works with and the way in which he, in turn, forms literary tradition. Thus: Kafka: Cervantes, Kafka: Bible, Kafka: Aesop, Kafka: Dostoevsky, Kafka: Melville; Kafka: O'Connor, Kafka: Singer; Kafka: Calvino, Kafka: Borges. Readings will center on four principal themes: conflicts with others and the self (and Kafka's psychological vision); the double; the play with paradox and infinity; and artists and animals. A seminar limited to 17 participants. Requirements include a short midterm paper (5-7 pages) and a longer final paper (10-12 pages).
 ENGL 3570Studies in American Literature
 Hemispheric Latinx Literature and Culture
Spring 2021  14144 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 11 / 24 (18 / 24)Carmen LamasTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 This course offers a survey of Latinx literature from a hemispheric perspective. We explore how the histories of US, Latin America, Europe, Africa and Asia come together to produce novels, poems, essays, and films that are now referred to as distinctly Latinx. In addition to exploring the integrated global histories that produce Latinidades, we will analyze how race, class, gender and sexuality impact Latinx literature, film and other artistic forms. All readings, writing, and discussions are in English.
 Short Stories of the Americas
 Short Stories of the Americas
Spring 2021  19802 002Lecture (3 Units)Open 29 / 30Anna BrickhouseTuTh 9:30am - 10:45am Web-Based Course
 This course explores short stories from and about the Americas, from the nineteenth century through the contemporary period: Victor Séjour, Edgar Allan Poe, Elena Garro, Jorge Luis Borges, Gabriel García Márquez, Carlos Fuentes, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Sandra Cisneros, Viet Thanh Nguyen, Junot Díaz, Jenny Zhang, Rebecca Roanhorse, Tommy Orange, among others.
 ENGL 3730American Literature of the Twentieth Century
 AMERICAN LITERATURE OF THE 20TH CENTURY
Spring 2021  18694 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed 25 / 0Stephen CushmanMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pm Claude Moore Nursing Educ G010
 We'll begin by surveying twentieth-century American literature through the lens of the short story, warming up with examples published in the 1890s by Kate Chopin, Charles Chesnutt, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Edith Wharton, and Stephen Crane. Then we'll move the survey through modernism (e.g., Willa Cather, Sherwood Anderson, William Carlos Williams, Jean Toomer, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright) toward mid-century, with, among others, Eudora Welty, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, and Flannery O'Connor. From there our path leads through the second half of the twentieth century and into the first decade of the twenty-first with Donald Barthelme, Philip Roth, Joyce Carol Oates, Louise Erdrich, Ha Jin, David Foster Wallace, and Jhumpa Lahiri. At mid-semester the syllabus will change, turning to twentieth-century works chosen by members of the class, divided into small groups, with each group responsible for choosing a particular work, writer, or selection of writings, fiction or non-fiction, verse or prose. Each group will decide whether it wants to order another (inexpensive) book, use material available online, or scan its selection. Please come to the first class with ideas about two or three particular titles or authors you'd like to read in good company. Our text for the first part of the semester will be THE OXFORD BOOK OF AMERICAN SHORT STORIES (2nd ed., 2012), ed. by Joyce Carol Oates.
 ENGL 3840Contemporary Disability Theory
Spring 2021  18687 001SEM (3 Units)Closed 5 / 18 (19 / 18)Christopher KrentzMoWeFr 12:00pm - 12:50pm Web-Based Course
 In the last several decades, thinking about people with physical, cognitive, and sensory differences has moved from a mostly pathological medical-based understanding to a more rights-based framework. In this course we will consider how conceptions of disability have changed and how these theories relate to the depiction of disabled people in literature. The syllabus is still under constructions, but we will likely study critical theory by writers like Goffman, Davis, Nussbaum, Siebers, Quayson, Davidson, Puar, and Erevelles; read literature such as Wells’ “The Country of the Blind,” Morrison’s Sula, Haddon’s The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, Raine’s Tribes, and Sinha’s Animal’s People; and probably study a documentary film or two. Requirements include thoughtful preparation and participation, group leading of discussion, two 5-6 page papers, quizzes, and a reading journal.
 ENGL 4500Seminar in English Literature
 Literature and Environmental Justice
 Literature and Environmental Justice
Spring 2021  19688 001SEM (3 Units)Open 11 / 18Mary KuhnMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 From chemical spills to soil contamination, natural resource extraction to pollution, species extinction and climate change, we live on a planet rife with harm caused by human consumption. One lesson of the global climate crisis is that its detrimental effects are inescapable. They affect everyone and everything. Yet risk and harm are not evenly distributed. Some communities have long borne the brunt of these processes while others have remained relatively unscathed. Industry has made some places unlivable and laws protect some better than others. The current climate crisis throws such inequalities into stark relief. This course considers how literature has navigated the relationship between environmental practices and social justice. We’ll consider how authors have incorporated a call for environmental justice into their literary worldmaking. And we’ll explore how they might help us see, imagine, and fight for more egalitarian presents and futures. What models of justice and repair might literature offer us?
 Sally Hemings University
 Sally Hemings University
Spring 2021  19987 002SEM (3 Units)Open 17 / 18Lisa WoolforkTuTh 9:30am - 10:45am Web-Based Course
 Readings include essays, short stories, podcast episodes, short videos, a novel. Most readings will be in a single coursepack.
 This course is “Sally Hemings University.” Its objective is to prepare students to examine and reconfigure the status quo. This course seeks to help students appreciate the shift from euphemisms (“racially-charged” or “racially-tinged”) to vocabularies of consequence (“racist” or “white supremacist”), to foster a facility for talking capably and comfortably about “uncomfortable” topics such as systems of domination and their influence upon university and daily life. “Sally Hemings University” is a site where the adverse effects of overt and subtle forms of white supremacy, patriarchy, capitalism and other systems of dominance are scrutinized. As a course, “Sally Hemings University” explores questions generated by re-framing “Mr. Jefferson’s University” (and universities generally) as a site that destabilizes the dominant narrative of the university as Jefferson’s primary property and by extension that of similarly entitled white men.
 ENGL 4510Seminar in Medieval Literature
 Medieval Lyric
 Medieval Lyric: Love, Death, and Song
Spring 2021  19980 001SEM (3 Units)Open 15 / 18Bruce HolsingerMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 This seminar will explore the fascinating world of lyric poetry in medieval Europe, from Latin hymns to troubadour and trobairitz love songs to the Middle English lyrics of the later Middle Ages. We'll read lyric poems by authors such as Hrotsvitha, Hildegard of Bingen, the Comtessa de Dia, Francis Petrarch, Geoffrey Chaucer, Merecina of Gerona, Guillaume de Machaut, and many others, in Latin, Italian, Hebrew, Arabic, Spanish, French, Occitan, Old and Middle English, and other languages (all but Middle English examples will be provided in translation). Our emphasis will be on close reading and analysis of individual poems and collections of poems, though we'll pay some attention to the manuscript contexts of medieval lyric. The seminar will also rely on students' own expertise as consumers of contemporary lyric, much of which has its roots in premodern forms. Coursework will consist of short writing assignments, active participation in class discussions, and a final seminar paper at the end of the semester.
 ENGL 4530Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Literature
 English Poetry 1660-1789
 English Poetry from the Restoration of the Monarchy to the French Revolution
Spring 2021  19740 001SEM (3 Units)Open4 / 18 (4 / 18)Michael SuarezTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pm Web-Based Course
 We will close-read English poetic texts on London, loss, love and marriage, British liberty, land and nation, and much more.
 This class will focus on the close reading of eighteenth-century poetic texts. Students will be given opportunities to explore the alternative canon, to consider the relationship between the C18 publishing world and literary celebrity, to learn about the roles of poetry in the construction of public and private identities, & to explore the practice of poetry by women authors.
 Gothic Forms
Spring 2021  19977 002SEM (3 Units)Open17 / 18Cynthia WallMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm Chemistry Bldg 206
 Gothic literature burst onto the scene in the eighteenth century with ruined castles, ethereal music, brooding villains and surprisingly sturdy heroines, all performing as metaphors of our deepest fears and fiercest resistances. Throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries the gothic continued as a genre of cultural anxiety. This seminar will survey gothic literature through both history and genre: from the classic novels, such as Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto (1764), Matthew Lewis’s The Monk (1797), Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818) (and Mel Brooks’s 1974 Young Frankenstein), Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey (1818) and Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House (1959) (with the classic 1963 film version The Haunting); through the poetry of John Keats, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Christina Rossetti; the plays of Matthew Lewis and Richard Brinsley Peake; and the short stories of Edgar Allan Poe, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, W. W. Jacobs, Richard Matheson, and Stephen King. And we will ask ourselves: What are we afraid of? Active participation, a presentation, weekly short commentaries, one short paper (5-7pp) and one longer research paper (10-12pp).
 ENGL 4540Seminar in Nineteenth-Century Literature
 Literature and Science
Spring 2021  13310 001SEM (3 Units)Open5 / 18 (7 / 18)Paul CantorTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pm Web-Based Course
 This course will study the impact of science on nineteenth-century literature and in particular the development of science fiction as a genre, with emphasis on the epoch-making works of H. G. Wells. We will examine the ways in which science posed a challenge to literature and called into question the very notion of artistic truth. But we will also consider the ways in which science served as a new form of inspiration for fiction writers, beginning with Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. One of the main subjects of the course will be the impact of Darwin and Darwinism. We will discuss the relation of science to the Victorian crisis of faith and also explore the interrelation of science and the British Empire. Writers studied will include Jules Verne, Robert Louis Stevenson, Edwin Abbott, and Arthur Conan Doyle. One class presentation, one long paper, and class participation.
 ENGL 4560Seminar in Modern and Contemporary Literature
 Ecofeminist Poetics
 Ecofeminist Poetics
Spring 2021  18679 001SEM (3 Units)Open 11 / 18Brian TeareTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm Contact Department
 Instructor permission required - please apply through SIS. ETP students welcome ! This class will be held in-person with a remote learning option for those who need it.
 In October of 2018, the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released an unequivocal new report: “There is alarming evidence that important tipping points, leading to irreversible changes in major ecosystems and the planetary climate system, may already have been reached or passed.” This seminar will explore this historic moment of irreversible biospheric change – a new geological era some scientists call the Anthropocene – through the critical perspectives offered by feminist and environmental thought and the creative perspectives offered by poetry. As a literature survey, this course explores an understudied tradition in Modernist and Postmodern North American environmental writing: women whose poetry articulates both a feminist poetics and a vision of feminist ecological citizenship. The survey spans a century, from Anne Spencer’s Harlem Renaissance-era poems of Black Nature to Brenda Hillman’s contemporary poetic experiments in direct action, trance consciousness, and watershed mapping. As an introduction to ecofeminist theory, ecofeminist poetics, and intersectional ecologies, this course poses questions central to the ever-evolving discourses of ecofeminism and ecopoetics: what roles do gender, sex, sexuality, and race play in our relationships to the natural world? What roles do they play in shaping environmental politics, policies, and actions? What ethical contracts do feminist ecological citizens make with each other, with capitalist globalized culture, with the more-than-human world, and with language? How might an ecofeminist poem behave, aesthetically? What political values might it espouse? Paired with curated readings in ecopoetics, ecocriticism, and feminist and critical race theories, poetry by four Modernist and four Postmodern ecofeminist poets will serve as our guides to the poetics of the Anthropocene – which will also be the focus of our final papers. During the first half of the semester each of us will be researching and compiling an annotated bibliography that will form the critical archive from which our final papers will draw. These papers will be drafted in completion, then peer-reviewed and conferenced, before being polished for a final grade.
 Caribbean Sci-Fi and Fantasy
Spring 2021  13382 003SEM (3 Units)Open10 / 18 (14 / 18)Njelle HamiltonTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pm Web-Based Course
 In this advanced undergraduate seminar, you will encounter Caribbean writers working at the cutting edge of SF/F, and discover novels, stories, artwork and film that center Caribbean settings, peoples, and culture, even as they expand the definition of genre. Authors and auteurs from the English-, Spanish- and French-speaking Caribbean might include: Nalo Hopkinson, Tobias Buckell, Karen Lord, Junot Díaz, Rita Indiana, Marcia Douglas, Ernest Pepin, René Depestre, and Agustín de Rojas. Assignments will include short critical essays and a long research paper where you think through how Caribbean texts redefine, expand, or critique mainstream SF/F.
 American Novels, American Controversies
 American Novels, American Controversies
Spring 2021  19691 005SEM (3 Units)Open 12 / 18Victoria OlwellTuTh 9:30am - 10:45am Web-Based Course
 How do recent U.S. novels enter into contemporary political and social questions? As works of fiction, what particular expressive resources do novels bring public discourse? If novels seek to persuade readers to adopt a position, how do they do so? This course approaches such questions by considering novels alongside select contemporary non-fiction. The novels in the course address such issues as climate change, mass incarceration, immigration, women’s status, and modern Native American identity. Readings will include works by Toni Morrison, Rachel Kushner, Tommy Orange, Richard Powers, Naomi Alderman, Laila Lalami, Essi Edugyan, Tayari Jones, and Ocean Vuong. In addition to reading novels and sources related to contemporary issues, we’ll also study the history and aesthetics of the novel. Course requirements will include two 7-page papers, a final exam, and energetic class participation.
 ENGL 4561Seminar in Modern Literature and Culture
 Poetry in a Global Age
Spring 2021  13383 003SEM (3 Units)Closed16 / 0Jahan RamazaniMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 How does poetry articulate and respond to the globalizing processes that accelerate in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries? In this seminar on modern and contemporary global poetry in English, we will explore the world in poetry and poetry in the world. We will closely read poets ranging from global modernists like Eliot, Yeats, Stevens, and McKay to contemporary American poets of color such as Hayes, Lee, and Silko, and postcolonial poets of Ireland, India, Africa, Britain, and the Caribbean, such as Walcott, Heaney, Goodison, Philip, Okot p’Bitek, Okigbo, Evaristo, and Daljit Nagra.
 Literature and Human Rights
Spring 2021  14213 005SEM (3 Units)Open4 / 18 (5 / 18)Christopher KrentzMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pm Web-Based Course
 What does literature have to do with human rights, with the aspirational effort to ensure the protection of persons everywhere from persecution and deprivation? In this course we will begin by considering the history of human rights, including debates over their legitimacy. Then we will study recent theory on the relationship of rights to literature and read a variety of relevant contemporary fiction, including Danticat’s The Farming of Bones, Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, Coetzee’s Disgrace, Sinha’s Animal’s People, Abani’s Song for Night, and Satrapi’s graphic novel Persepolis. These works often deal with troubling topics, but they do so with grace and occasionally unexpected beauty. The class will be taught virtually and will be about 80% synchronous (live on-line) and 20% asynchronous (off-line). Requirements will include active and informed participation, brief quizzes, two short 3-page papers, and a 7-page final paper that should include some literary research.
 ENGL 5559New Course in English Literature
 Milton and Whitman
 MILTON AND WHITMAN
Spring 2021  19819 002SEM (3 Units)Open8 / 15Mark EdmundsonTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm Web-Based Course
 Milton and Whitman ENGL 5 – We’ll read with care and imagination what are perhaps the two greatest long poems in the English language, John Milton’s Paradise Lost and Walt Whitman’s Song of Myself. Both are works of palpable genius, but of very different kinds. Milton’s poem is committed to hierarchy, order and degree. In his cosmos, justified subordination and command are the highest ideals. His world at its best is firmly and yet in its way flexibly ordered. He is a brilliant exemplar of true conservatism. Whitman is rather different. “Unscrew the locks from the doors / Unscrew the doors themselves from their jams,” Walt chants. Whitman wants to dissolve all needless boundaries in the interest of perfect democratic equality. He wants to undo the barriers between old and young, Black and White, rich and poor, women and men. And he does so, at least imaginatively, in Song. We’ll read the poems for what they are in and of themselves. But we’ll also consider them as brilliant exemplars of the progressive mind and its conservative counterpart. Students may be surprised as to where they fall in this mapping. With any luck, we’ll find ourselves, in the words of the Whitmanian, Wallace Stevens, “more truly and more strange.”
 Narratives of Teaching
 NARRATIVES OF TEACHING AND LEARNING
Spring 2021  19986 003SEM (3 Units)Open7 / 15James SeitzMo 6:30pm - 9:00pm Wilson Hall 214
 This is a HYBRID course. Please plan to meet in person for half of our class meetings.
 This course will examine a variety of ways in which the classroom has been represented through narrative—sometimes by teachers and sometimes by students—in memoir, fiction, scholarship, and film. We’ll work on sharpening both our critical resistance to the shortcomings of these narratives and our critical appreciation of their accomplishments. All narratives of teaching or learning are inevitably partial: nobody can say it all, even when representing a single class, much less when describing what happened during the course of a semester or year. Yet writers do try to portray their experience as a teacher or student over long as well as brief periods of time, and we can learn from their struggle to do so convincingly.
 ENGL 5830Introduction to World Religions, World Literatures
 THE BIBLE
Spring 2021  12829 001SEM (3 Units)Permission 13 / 15Stephen CushmanFr 10:00am - 12:30pm New Cabell Hall 332
 The stories, rhythms, and rhetoric of the Bible have been imprinting readers and writers of English since the seventh century. Moving through selections from the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament, from Genesis to Revelation, this course focuses on deepening biblical literacy and sharpening awareness of biblical connections to whatever members of the class are reading in other contexts. Along the way we will discuss English translations of the Bible; the process of canonization; textual history; and the long trail of interpretive approaches, ancient to contemporary. Our text will be the New Oxford Annotated Bible, 5th ed. All are welcome. No previous knowledge of the Bible needed or assumed.
 ENGL 8380Eighteenth-Century Prose Fiction
 Women and the Rise of the Novel
Spring 2021  19696 001Lecture (3 Units)Open4 / 14Brad PasanekMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pm Web-Based Course
 This is a class about women’s writing in the eighteenth century that puts emphasis on gender and genre. We’ll focus on the fictions of Aphra Behn, Eliza Haywood, Charlotte Lennox, Sarah Scott, Frances Burney, Elizabeth Inchbald, and Jane Austen. In the main, our readings follow and complicate Ian Watt’s foundational The Rise of the Novel (1957); secondary assignments will look to the ways in which his historical claims have been revised in the work of Jane Spencer, Janet Todd, Terry Castle, Catherine Gallagher, Michael McKeon, Frances Ferguson, Laura Doyle, and others. In this course then we investigate eighteenth-century literary history with an agenda, queering and querying Watt’s canon and providing a place for the anonymously authored The Woman of Colour (1808).
 ENGL 8520Studies in Renaissance Literature
 Renaissance Experiments
Spring 2021  13326 001SEM (3 Units)Open10 / 14Clare KinneyMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 Class will meet via zoom. Click on blue number 13326 for course description.
 This course will examine a wide range of early modern writings (with some particular attention to Shakespeare) within certain broader early modern literary contexts, paying particular attention to the re-imagination of literary kinds and to the way in which such experiments in genre inflect narratives of desire and the representation of gendered agency. We will read Shakespeare’s Sonnets in dialogue with Mary Wroth’s Pamphilia to Amphilanthus (addressing both sequences as Petrarchan “counterdiscourses” crafted by social outsiders), explore As You Like It and The Winter’s Tale in relation to such genre- and gender-bending pastoral romances as Sidney’s Arcadia, Thomas Lodge’s Rosalynde and Robert Greene’s Pandosto, and examine the interplay of power relations, gender and tragedy in Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra, John Webster’s Duchess of Malfi and Elizabeth Cary’s Tragedy of Mariam. We’ll discuss the heuristic capacities of genre (and the gendering of genres), we’ll attempt to historicize the period’s fascination with literary hybridity, and we’ll reexamine rather rigorously the question of Shakespeare’s “exceptionality” within his historical moment. Throughout the course, our primary texts will be supplemented by a variety of lively historical/critical/theoretical readings. Course requirements: lively participation in discussion, an oral presentation, a series of reflective e-mail postings and a final long paper.
 ENGL 8540Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature
 Word Magic in the 19th Century
 Charm and Danger
Spring 2021  13328 001SEM (3 Units)Open8 / 15Herbert TuckerTu 5:00pm - 7:30pm Web-Based Course
 This survey of Romantic and Victorian poems, novels, tales, and plays having to do with magic will plot the enchantment represented within the text against the enchantment the text designs to work on its reader. Changing configurations within this plot are likely to emerge as our syllabus moves from the turn of the 19th century just past the turn of the 20th. As we go, we’ll compare otherwise disparate writings under such rubrics as charm language, witchcraft and gender, the historical backdating and imperial outsourcing of magic, the weave of glamour, the might of the occult book – all eligible, among other topics, for the papers students will prepare: two shorter essays (7-10 pp) and one longer (12-15 pp). Students will also report to the class on outside readings in a couple of informal class presentations. All will transpire, inescapably though contestably, under the baleful aegis of the disenchantment of modernity, and the dialectic of enlightenment it entails. Poems unimpeachably canonical (e.g., Coleridge, Shelley, Browning, Tennyson, the Rossettis, Yeats), fiction from a mixed bag of tricks (e.g., Lewis, the Shelleys, Ainsworth, Bulwer-Lytton, Stevenson, Twain, Chesnutt, Wilde), plays where we can find them.
 Literature and Science
 Literature and Science
Spring 2021  14407 002SEM (3 Units)Open2 / 18 (7 / 18)Paul CantorTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pm Web-Based Course
 This course will study the impact of science on nineteenth-century literature and in particular the development of science fiction as a genre, with emphasis on the epoch-making works of H. G. Wells. We will examine the ways in which science posed a challenge to literature and called into question the very notion of artistic truth. But we will also consider the ways in which science served as a new form of inspiration for fiction writers, beginning with Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. One of the main subjects of the course will be the impact of Darwin and Darwinism. We will discuss the relation of science to the Victorian crisis of faith and also explore the interrelation of science and the British Empire. Writers studied will include Jules Verne, Robert Louis Stevenson, Edwin Abbott, and Arthur Conan Doyle. One class presentation, one long paper, and class participation.
 Women Novelists of Queen Victoria's Reign and DH
 Women Novelists of Queen Victoria's Reign and DH Methods
Website  19818 003SEM (3 Units)Open5 / 14Alison BoothTuTh 9:30am - 10:45am Web-Based Course
 Working with materials, tools, and data from Collective Biographies of Women (CBW), a Scholars’ Lab and IATH database project, we will branch out from the Jubilee volume of 1897: Women Novelists of Queen Victoria’s Reign, in which living women novelists write chapter-length biographical critiques of deceased novelists who wrote since the Regency. A prevailing question in the course will be the force of identity- and periodization-politics, so to speak: the categories that classify as “Victorian” a range of women writers of fiction (and their literary settings) from various regions or nationalities (Irish, Scottish, etc.). Students will be encouraged to design research projects on biographies of women of color, other genres of literature, other occupations than writers, and many variations on the career and gender narratives as indicated in CBW. Readings will include novels and other writings by some in the 1897 list (Brontes, Eliot, Gaskell, and lesser-known), and essays on literary periodization, cultural geographies, space, life writing, and digital humanities. No prior familiarity with digital methods is expected; we will learn some aspects of XML editing and working with data. This course can serve as an elective in the Graduate DH Certificate.
 ENGL 8559New Course in English Literature
 Music, Mimesis, Modernity
 Music, Mimesis, Modernity (click on course number for description)
Spring 2021  19825 002Lecture (3 Units)Open3 / 10 (5 / 10)Michael PuriTu 9:30am - 12:00pm Web-Based Course
 “If human beings suddenly ceased imitating, all forms of culture would vanish.” Drawing inspiration from this striking claim by René Girard, this seminar will ask and seek to answer several questions. In the history of mimesis, what has been imitated, by whom, with what means, and to what end? How and why have western attitudes toward mimesis changed, particularly over the past two centuries? And how does mimesis figure into western musical theory and practice? The ability to decipher western musical notation will help you to read certain assigned texts, but is neither expected nor required. Please note that this Spring 2021 seminar will meet in the morning via Zoom in order to accommodate students taking the course online from abroad.
 ENGL 8560Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature
 Literature and Human Rights
 Literature and Human Rights
Spring 2021  21275 001SEM (3 Units)Open1 / 18 (5 / 18)Christopher KrentzMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pm Web-Based Course
 What does literature have to do with human rights, with the aspirational effort to ensure the protection of persons everywhere from persecution and deprivation? In this course we will begin by considering the history of human rights, including debates over their legitimacy. Then we will study recent theory on the relationship of rights to literature and read a variety of relevant contemporary fiction, including Danticat’s The Farming of Bones, Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, Coetzee’s Disgrace, Sinha’s Animal’s People, Abani’s Song for Night, and Satrapi’s graphic novel Persepolis. These works often deal with troubling topics, but they do so with grace and occasionally unexpected beauty. The class will be taught virtually and will be about 80% synchronous (live on-line) and 20% asynchronous (off-line). Requirements include active and informed participation, quizzes, two short 3-page essays and a final 12-page research paper.
 ENGL 8570Studies in American Literature
 Latinx Literature and History
Spring 2021  19690 001SEM (3 Units)Open8 / 12Carmen LamasTh 3:30pm - 6:00pm Web-Based Course
 This seminar provides a comprehensive overview of Latinx literature and histories by engaging the major critical debates in the field of Latinx studies (critical race theory, border studies, hemispheric frameworks, et al). We will explore the writings and histories of different national-origin Latinx groups and the construction of the term Latinx. Methodological strategies for researching Latinx topics will be addressed. Those who wish to increase their knowledge of Latinx topics; who wish to contextualize their own projects within Latinx literature and history; and/or who are considering a chapter or a thesis that include Latinx literary expression are encouraged to take this course. Proficiency in Spanish is not required.
 ENGL 8596Form and Theory of Poetry
 Poetic Forms and their Contemporary Variations
 Craft Seminar in Poetic Forms and their Contemporary Variations
Spring 2021  13333 001SEM (3 Units)Permission12 / 12Debra NystromTu 2:00pm - 4:30pm Web-Based Course
 This is a course designed for MFA students. If room permits, MA and PhD students may apply for instructor permission through SIS. This is a digital course with synchronous online meetings.
 In this MFA craft seminar, we'll be examining the many formal possibilities for making poems. Beginning with a focus on poetry's origins in magic and spell, we'll explore the ways such effects are available to us now in language, considering received forms and their contemporary variations: sonnet, ghazal, sestina, pantoum, villanelle, blank verse, terza rima, haibun, free verse and numerous other shapes, including the kinds of opportunities that open up at the liminal space between poetry and prose. The interplay of sound, rhythm and syntax in creating suspense and interweaving designs whose relations are registered in subliminal ways ("a more than usual state of emotion in a more than usual order") will be an ongoing study as we discuss and try out different formal arrangements. Students will help to lead a conversation on a particular poetic structure, will try out a number of formal possibilities in their own writing and receive workshop discussion, and will write a final paper concerned either with one form's effects in a number of different poems or one poet's use of form across a body of work. Readings may include poems and essays by Emily Dickinson, T.S. Eliot, Wallace Stevens, Robert Frost, Robert Hayden, Elizabeth Bishop, Gwendolyn Brooks, Philip Larkin, Sylvia Plath, James Wright, Yusef Komunyakaa, Seamus Heaney, Louise Glűck, Robert Hass, Agha Shahid Ali, Claudia Emerson, Amy Hempel, Li-Young Lee, Terrance Hayes, Lydia Davis, Alberto Rios, Natasha Trethewey, Ross Gay, Sinead Morrissey, Mary Szybist, Natalie Diaz, Jericho Brown, Chloe Honum, Paisley Rekdal, Olivier de la Paz, Layli Long Soldier and others, including work by poets on our faculty.
 ENGL 8598Form and Theory of Fiction
 The Esoteric: Ecstasy, the Mysteries, the Gods
 The Esoteric in Literature: Ecstasy, the Mysteries, the Gods
Spring 2021  13338 001SEM (3 Units)Permission11 / 12Micheline MarcomFr 2:00pm - 4:30pm Web-Based Course
 This class is designed for MFA writers and will have an emphasis on creative work, but others are welcome to join, room permitting.
 “Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent.” Wittgenstein In this course we will read a wide array of ancient and modern texts as we trace the connections and correspondences transmitted inside literary works of the hidden dimensions of reality from Plato to Plotinus to William Blake and Coleridge, and in the 20th century: Jorge Luis Borges, Tolstoy, Henry Corbin, Carl Jung and Fernando Pessoa, among others.
 ENGL 9560Advanced Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature
 Poetry in a Global Age
Spring 2021  13330 001SEM (3 Units)Open7 / 15Jahan RamazaniMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pm Web-Based Course
 How does poetry articulate and respond to the globalizing processes that accelerate in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries? In this seminar, we will consider modern and contemporary poetry in English in relation to transnational, global, world literary, and postcolonial theory and history. We will closely read poets ranging from global modernists like Eliot, Yeats, Stevens, and McKay to contemporary American poets of color such as Hayes, Lee, and Silko, and postcolonial poets of Ireland, India, Africa, Britain, and the Caribbean, such as Walcott, Heaney, Goodison, Philip, Okot p’Bitek, Okigbo, Evaristo, and Daljit Nagra.
 ENGL 9580Advanced Studies in Critical Theory
 Criticism and Attachment
Spring 2021  13331 001SEM (3 Units)Closed13 / 0Rita FelskiMo 6:30pm - 9:00pm Web-Based Course
 In this course we’ll look closely at attachments in literature as well as attachments to literature, and consider their implications for literary criticism, theory, and method. The premise of the course is that “attachment” is to be understood broadly; as not just subjective, but intersubjective, collective, or institutional; as not only emotional but also cognitive, intellectual, and political. There are many reasons why people become attached to literature; we’ll consider what some of those reasons might be. Critics, moreover, form ties not only to literature, but also to methods, theories, and fields of study. What does it mean to become invested in a method (close reading versus distant reading); a theory (being a Foucauldian or a Lacanian), or a disciplinary identity (looking down on “mere sociologists” or “naïve” psychologists)? In short, attachments are everywhere in literary studies. The focus of the course is less on explaining attachments by resorting to pre-given frameworks than on describing them: detailing their distinctive features and paying attention to what they are and do.
Writing and Rhetoric
 ENWR 1510Writing and Critical Inquiry
 Writing and Community Engagement
 Writing About Feminism, Diversity, and Community Engagement (Click course number for description)
Spring 2021  10855 008SEM (3 Units)Open 11 / 18Indu OhriMoWeFr 11:00am - 11:50am Web-Based Course
 In a world of social distancing, flattening curves, and racial protests, do you wish that you could reach out and help others within the safety of your own home? How would you even know where to begin? During these uncertain times, many people have chosen to perform service work with the vulnerable and to write about social justice for women, minorities, and others. You will explore the answers to these questions in a profound and surprisingly local way by reading and writing about British and American women authors and sharing your knowledge with the Charlottesville community. These feminist works are the perfect place to search for answers because women writers have experienced injustice, oppression, and bigotry over the past three centuries. You will write about, reflect on, and perform community engagement through a feminist lens, especially since both movements serve historically disadvantaged populations. As you read these women authors’ works, you will discover powerful compositional moves and feminist rhetorical strategies that you can use to inspire others to take action and improve our world. You will further consider how their written reflections can foster values such as love, understanding, and compassion and cultivate your deeper self-awareness through contemplative writing. Together, we will use feminist rhetoric, reflective writing, and service work to engage in praxis, or the application of feminist theory to reality. As a class, we will work on our collective project with UVA’s volunteer center, Madison House, to plan out creative arts boxes for students in Charlottesville schools. Our Praxis Project will support their learning about BIPOC (black, indigenous, people of color) women, feminist activism, and women’s literature and inspire students to empower themselves through writing.
 Writing about the Arts
 Place and Class in Horror Fiction
Spring 2021  10856 009SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Grant KingMoWeFr 12:00pm - 12:50pm Contact Department
 What is horror as a genre? What conventions does it use? How does horror use place and class to tell its stories? Horror is an important part of our society’s culture that lets us explore our fears and our anxieties--it tells us who or what we are supposed to view as other, monstrous, terrifying. Through analyzing horror, we can understand our society’s biases towards normativity, and can perhaps even work to undercut them. This course explores horror through the lens of place and class, with intertwining interests in race, gender, queerness, and the national traumas of the United States. We’ll read texts by a range of authors, and engage with a few films and TV series, to understand what horror tells us about our societal biases and to enrich our skills as writers.
 Writing about Culture/Society
 Contagion
Spring 2021  10860 013SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Kaylee LambMoWeFr 11:00am - 11:50am Monroe Hall 124
 For this course, we will be examining the cultural anxiety that surrounds the topic of contagion. Looking at both historical and fictional works, we will have an in-depth exploration of humankind's greatest fears and how our current affairs align (or contradict) with these narratives. Our class will go on to study the major themes of infestation, infection, and contamination to help us understand our present moment in time. Alongside literary works, we also will be using a couple of films to help us understand that viruses/plagues/infections can at times be the least of one's worries in a post-apocalyptical world.
 Writing and Community Engagement
 Writing About Feminism, Diversity, and Community Engagement (Click course number for description)
Spring 2021  10861 014SEM (3 Units)Open 17 / 18Indu OhriMoWeFr 1:00pm - 1:50pm Web-Based Course
 In a world of social distancing, flattening curves, and racial protests, do you wish that you could reach out and help others within the safety of your own home? How would you even know where to begin? During these uncertain times, many people have chosen to perform service work with the vulnerable and to write about social justice for women, minorities, and others. You will explore the answers to these questions in a profound and surprisingly local way by reading and writing about British and American women authors and sharing your knowledge with the Charlottesville community. These feminist works are the perfect place to search for answers because women writers have experienced injustice, oppression, and bigotry over the past three centuries. You will write about, reflect on, and perform community engagement through a feminist lens, especially since both movements serve historically disadvantaged populations. As you read these women authors’ works, you will discover powerful compositional moves and feminist rhetorical strategies that you can use to inspire others to take action and improve our world. You will further consider how their written reflections can foster values such as love, understanding, and compassion and cultivate your deeper self-awareness through contemplative writing. Together, we will use feminist rhetoric, reflective writing, and service work to engage in praxis, or the application of feminist theory to reality. As a class, we will work on our collective project with UVA’s volunteer center, Madison House, to plan out creative arts boxes for students in Charlottesville schools. Our Praxis Project will support their learning about BIPOC (black, indigenous, people of color) women, feminist activism, and women’s literature and inspire students to empower themselves through writing.
 Writing and Community Engagement
 D.I.Y. (Do It Yourself) - Click course number for description
Spring 2021  10863 017SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Michelle GottschlichMoWe 5:00pm - 6:15pm Web-Based Course
 D.I.Y., as it's known today, has existed for nearly a century. Taking hold in the post-war American suburbs, D.I.Y. making has shifted dramatically through time—birthing the iconoclastic punk era, pinterest, GoFundMe healthcare, Tik Tok videos, soundcloud rap, and more. What do these materials, scenes, makers, and movements have in common? Rhetorically rich and culturally fraught, studying D.I.Y. will get us thinking about how ideas are crafted and cooked into the language of things. Through writing, reading, and discussion, we will carefully tease these ideas out to see what we really make of them. We’ll practice what we study as artists and writers, and we'll also chat with visiting D.I.Y. artists, musicians, and writers. Perhaps most importantly, we’ll learn from D.I.Y. communities how to build supportive, inclusive, and non-judgmental creative spaces in which we can collaborate and share our work with one another.
 Writing and Community Engagement
 Social Justice, Critical Race Theory & Argumentation
Spring 2021  12265 022SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Eyal Handelsman KatzMoWe 5:00pm - 6:15pm Web-Based Course
 (click course number for description & email ehh2st@virginia.edu with any questions about this course)
 Imagine this: it’s Thanksgiving (or Hanukkah, or any social gathering with people who might not share your ideas). It’s perfectly pleasant (or not) and then – GASP! – someone brings up that topic. The one that always leads to an argument. And it does, and you argue but, afterwards, you are disappointed with how it turned out; perhaps you forgot to say something (or said too much). In this class we will endeavor to not be disappointed. To do so we will learn how to argue but, more importantly, how to think. Our writing will be a vehicle to our thinking. But how does writing relate to social justice? How can we use our writing to enact or advocate for social justice in our community? Since social justice is such a broad concept, in this course we will learn about it through the frame of critical race theory (CRT) and discover how activists, scholars, artists and more engage with racial justice, exploring issues like systemic racism, privilege, and intersectionality. This course will give you opportunities to think and write about the social justice issues you care about so that, when it ends, you are empowered to fight for the causes you believe in and never feel unprepared to discuss the topics that matter to you.
 Writing about Culture/Society
 Writing Utopia
Spring 2021  12266 026SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Emelye KeyserTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pm Dell 2 103
 From the 16th century through to modern day, writers have composed utopias to imagine worlds that prioritize different ideologies: from communism to feminism, environmentalism, equality, equity, and Christianity. The utopian form is both useful and problematic in these endeavors; and this course will be dedicated to exploring some questions that arise in reading utopias. Has anyone ever imagined a utopia that works for everyone? What place is there for progress in a utopia—and what place is there for plot in utopian writing? How does utopian thinking affect how we as political people operate in this imperfect world? Authors that we read will include Thomas More, Octavia Butler, and Margaret Atwood.
 Writing about Culture/Society
 Defining and Defending Your Taste
Spring 2021  10869 027SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Jessica WalkerTuTh 9:30am - 10:45am Dell 1 105
 Click course number on left for description. Email Jessica Walker at jmw9x@virginia.edu with any questions about this class.
 In this section of ENWR-1510, your personal taste serves as the point of departure. We will begin with your gut reaction to a piece of art or culture. Then we will use that reaction to build an essay. How do you make your ideas and opinions matter? How do you argue your taste is superior? How do you make sense of your aesthetics in the greater context of culture? How do you transform your reactions to Mozart, Megan Thee Stallion, a Tik Tok trend, Salvador Dali or your grandmother’s cooking into an essay that reaches beyond your initial response? In this class any piece of art or culture is valid material. High class, low class, no class, it’s all fair game. All I care about is that you care about your topic, whether you are writing from a place of adoration or revulsion.
 Writing about the Arts
 Writing about Shadows
Spring 2021  12267 029SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Zoe Kempf-HarrisMoWe 5:00pm - 6:15pm Web-Based Course
 Shadows are and aren’t—shapes without substance. Shadows come and go, and they are subject to time and place, to conditions of light and dark, and to the objects that give them form. In the course of this seminar, we will not only explore shadows as they appear in literature and art, but we will also explore the context for these shadows. What causes a shadow to fall within a passage—and why is it important that the shadow falls there specifically? Writing is born of intention, and literary shadows are intentional too. Writing is how we use language to investigate that which presents itself obscurely— to make inquiries into and arguments about things that are uncertain. Working across the textual, the visual, and even the cinematic, we will examine how shadows function representationally and changeably. We will look to authors and artists to uncover how these shadows can be manipulated to serve the purpose of the text, as well as how these shadows color our understanding of the passages in which they appear. Undertaking a study of shadows will allow us to grapple with the duality that allows them to both obscure and represent the realities presented to us.
 Writing about Digital Media
 Investigating Multiple Literacies in the Digital Age
Spring 2021  11514 031SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Katie CampbellMoWeFr 12:00pm - 12:50pm Web-Based Course
 What does it mean to be literate? Digitally literate? Social media literate? News literate? In this class, we will explore these questions and more as we define and redefine literacy. We will also be thinking about and developing our own multiple literacies. We will specifically be focusing on literacy in relation to digital media, which has become increasingly important during the COVID-19 pandemic and in the world of social distancing. We will start our class by reading literacy narratives. You will then write your own literacy narrative, which will help you to think about your own relationship with multiple literacies. Then, we will read and write about digital news and online commencement speeches to understand what it means to be literate in these areas. Finally, at the end of our course, we will work with and critically think about literacy in relation to social media, specifically Instagram and Twitter. No prior experience with these social media platforms – or anything else we will cover in this course – is needed.
 Writing about Culture/Society
 Defining and Defending Your Taste
Spring 2021  11995 036SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Jessica WalkerTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pm Clark Hall 102
 Click course number on left for description. Email Jessica Walker at jmw9x@virginia.edu with any questions about this class.
 In this section of ENWR-1510, your personal taste serves as the point of departure. We will begin with your gut reaction to a piece of art or culture. Then we will use that reaction to build an essay. How do you make your ideas and opinions matter? How do you argue your taste is superior? How do you make sense of your aesthetics in the greater context of culture? How do you transform your reactions to Mozart, Megan Thee Stallion, a Tik Tok trend, Salvador Dali or your grandmother’s cooking into an essay that reaches beyond your initial response? In this class any piece of art or culture is valid material. High class, low class, no class, it’s all fair game. All I care about is that you care about your topic, whether you are writing from a place of adoration or revulsion.
 Writing about Culture/Society
 Writing Towards Climate Action
Spring 2021  12268 038SEM (3 Units)Open 11 / 18Hannah LoebMoWeFr 9:00am - 9:50am Maury Hall 104
 This course is aimed at developing your ability to engage in written and spoken discourse both in academic contexts and in the broader, civic and social contexts of a university community, local communities, nation(s), and even global communities. It will ask you to use writing to discover how insight, precision, and nuance function across rhetorical contexts. It will incite occasions of writing and speaking as opportunities to initiate and sustain critical inquiry -- in other words, as loci for exploration of uncertainties as opposed to sites of static performance of the already-known. Above all, this course will place your writing at its center, giving you the chance to focus on when, why, and how you already are a consequential writer surrounded by other consequential writers, profoundly embedded in language and therefore flush with opportunities for expression and inquiry. This semester, our inquiry will focus on action we can and must take to mitigate the suffering that will accompany imminent climate disaster. We will begin by studying the discourses of disbelief, skepticism, misinformation, and inaction promulgated by those with vested interests in maintaining fossil fuel economies in America and around the world. We will complement that study with an exploration of forms and genres of witness, testimony, and appeal. Finally, we will take action through informed dialogue and outreach, including phone and text banking, as well as more systematically-oriented action like protest and appeals to those in power for specific, institutional changes. Course texts will include Losing Earth: A Recent History by Nathaniel Rich (2019) and The Story of More by Hope Jahren (2020), as well as the podcasts Mothers of Invention and Drilled.
 Writing about Culture/Society
 Is Chivalry Dead: From Knights and Ladies to Incels and Reality TV
Spring 2021  12270 040SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Katherine ChurchillTuTh 5:00pm - 6:15pm Web-Based Course
 please email krc2pr@virginia.edu if you have questions about this class
 Is chivalry dead? If so, who killed it? Context for our murder mystery: chivalry has shaped how we think about courtesy, gender, race, and power dynamics since the Middle Ages. But our understanding of it—and how we situate it in the present and the past—has changed drastically over time. Tracing a path from questing knights in shining armor to radicalized internet trolls and questions about giving up subway seats, we will investigate how fantasies of the past become rhetorical tools of the present. What is chivalry, anyway: humanizing kindness? An oppressive power dynamic? Is it truly old-fashioned? Or adaptable for a modern world? By observing how chivalry operates in texts from the 14th century to contemporary reality TV shows, we will learn to identify ideologies operating in art, science, and society and trace them across time periods. We will develop arguments about the relationships between social and political systems. In doing so, we will start to move comfortably between diverse genres and texts, synthesize complex ideas, and imagine new ways of seeing the world. Together, we’ll attempt to respond to questions like these: How do we maintain a healthy relationship to the past? What assumptions and histories are built into our understanding of “good behavior”? What do we owe one another, anyway?
 Writing about the Arts
 Imitation and the Apprenticeship of Writing (click on course number for description)
Spring 2021  12510 047SEM (3 Units)Open 13 / 18Catherine BlumeMoWeFr 11:00am - 11:50am Clark Hall 102
 In this course, we will explore writing as an apprenticeship. Imagine that you are a young painter living in 15th century Florence. Your parents have apprenticed you to one of the most well-known painters of the day and since a young age, you have been working your way up in the workshop. First, you were just sweeping floors and cleaning up dyes and tints; then, you began mixing paints; eventually, you were allowed to assist your master in compositions until finally, you have completed a Master Piece all on your own, proving that you have both mastered the style and technique taught to you by your master as well as experimented with your own style and techniques. In this example, you have mastered your craft first through imitation and then through exploration and experimentation. We will apply the same approach to writing in this course and choose for our masters some of the most well-known writers and rhetoricians of the Western Tradition—from Cicero to Hemingway—to guide us in our Writer’s Workshop.
 Writing about the Arts
 Reimagining Shakespeare's The Tempest
Spring 2021  12511 048SEM (3 Units)Open 12 / 18Mary Ruth RobinsonMoWe 5:00pm - 6:15pm Web-Based Course
 (click course number for description & email mrr7xr@virginia.edu with any questions about this course)
 Four hundred years and fourteen hundred IMDb writing credits later, it’s clear that Shakespeare has been immortalized in part by a long history of adaptation. In this course, we’ll explore a piece of that history through a single play: The Tempest. We will examine The Tempest in conjunction with adaptations by playwrights, novelists, and directors across centuries, focusing on how artists have engaged with Shakespeare at different cultural moments. We’ll dive into the issue of adaptation across global and temporal boundaries as well as questions around race and gender. By narrowing our focus to one play, we’ll remain focused on the ways we write and think while digging into broader questions about adaptation. Some of those questions might include: How can adaptation effectively address contemporary political/social issues? What happens to a text when its characters or setting change? Its form? When is it no longer an adaptation? What’s the difference between adaptation and appropriation? Translation and transformation? This course is designed to prepare you to write in a multitude of contexts. We’ll take on that challenge together by reading, thinking, and writing about texts across history and genres—from Renaissance drama to science fiction movies, song lyrics to academic arguments. We will ponder difficult questions, uncover unresolvable issues, and add our voices to thorny centuries-long debates. Most importantly, we’ll enter these conversations through writing as critical inquiry. Writing is the tool we will use to reflect, to investigate, to critique, and to create.
 Writing about the Arts
Website  12680 053SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Matthew DavisTuTh 8:00am - 9:15am Web-Based Course
 (to see a draft syllabus, click on the link to the left)
 ENWR 1510: Writing and Critical Inquiry Section 053: Points of View Mr. Matthew Davis Spring 2021 | Tu Th | 8:00-9:15 This course is intended to help you develop writing skills that will help you succeed while you are at UVA and also after you graduate. The theme for this section will be “points of view” in fiction. We will read and write about short stories, with a focus on different ways of telling a story. Most of the readings will be taken from an unusual anthology, Points of View, in which the stories are classified according to the mode of narration used in the story. One section of the anthology contains “interior monologues,” in which we seem to be inside the main character’s head, overhearing his or her thoughts; another section contains “dramatic monologues,” in which we overhear the narrator speaking aloud to another character; a third, letters written by the characters; a fourth, diary entries; and so on. We will look at eleven modes of narration and study two examples of most modes, reading about twenty stories in all. Your main task for the semester will be to write three essays in which you make a claim about one of the stories we have read and support that claim with evidence. Each essay will be drafted, workshopped, and revised. The target length for the revisions of these essays is 1000 to 1200 words, but quality of writing, thinking, and argumentation will count more than length. I will also ask you to write two short narratives (target length: 700-900 words) in which you “try out” one of the modes of narration we have studied. The narratives will be written once, without opportunity for revision. In addition, you will learn some principles of composition and complete an online library assignment. Because of Covid-19, this course will probably be conducted at least partly online, using mostly synchronous instruction. However, it will also include some asynchronous instruction for workshops, and we may use several online platforms (Zoom, Chat, NowComment, Perusall) to provide a bit of variety. If state laws and university policies allow me to, I will look for chances to meet with students individually and in person somewhere on grounds.
 Writing about the Arts
 Writing About Contemporary Poetry
Spring 2021  12688 054SEM (3 Units)Open 8 / 18Annyston PenningtonTuTh 8:00am - 9:15am Web-Based Course
 You're thinking it: I don't like poetry. As an undergraduate student, I felt the same way. From John Donne in high school English to Tumblr poets, the world of poetry seemed not only inaccessible but uninteresting. The more I read, however, and the more contemporary poets in particular that I read, the more I understood that not liking poetry is akin to not liking music. *You simply haven't found the poetry that speaks to you yet.* In this remote course, we will study the work of living poets and engage with the world of poetry as both critics and creatives. From published and acclaimed poets to emerging voices, we will immerse ourselves in the poetry of *today* and write and reflect on how the work speaks to you and to broader issues of class, race, climate, aesthetics, and other modern concerns. Students will have the opportunity to write in a variety of formats including research essays, informal responses, social media posts, and poetry itself. For questions, email the instructor at ahp9pn@virginia.edu
 Writing and Community Engagement
Spring 2021  12692 056SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Sarah O'BrienMoWeFr 11:00am - 11:50am Web-Based Course
 This course will meet synchronously on Wednesdays, and asynchronously on Mondays and Fridays (you'll have individual and/or group work due then).
 According to the conventional breakdown of modern American society, “home” is domestic space—interior, private, personal. Yet as the ongoing pandemic has demonstrated, these values are anything but stable: home is also a space that is inseparable from public, political life. In this course, we’ll practice academic writing and creative, collaborative forms of composition by writing about all of the messy, ambivalent meanings of home. As a Writing and Community Engagement section of ENWR1510, we will consider how the ideals, values, and limitations of home shape larger local communities. An array of literary, cinematic, and scholarly texts will provide us with occasions for writing; we will look to documentary film, in particular, as a genre that invites us to rethink the boundaries of home and to question the relations of power that structure conventional senses of “being at home.”
 Writing and Community Engagement
Spring 2021  12823 059SEM (3 Units)Open 11 / 18Sarah O'BrienMoWeFr 10:00am - 10:50am Web-Based Course
 This course will meet synchronously on Wednesdays, and asynchronously on Mondays and Fridays (you'll have individual and/or group work due then).
 According to the conventional breakdown of modern American society, “home” is domestic space—interior, private, personal. Yet as the ongoing pandemic has demonstrated, these values are anything but stable: home is also a space that is inseparable from public, political life. In this course, we’ll practice academic writing and creative, collaborative forms of composition by writing about all of the messy, ambivalent meanings of home. As a Writing and Community Engagement section of ENWR1510, we will consider how the ideals, values, and limitations of home shape larger local communities. An array of literary, cinematic, and scholarly texts will provide us with occasions for writing; we will look to documentary film, in particular, as a genre that invites us to rethink the boundaries of home and to question the relations of power that structure conventional senses of “being at home.”
 Writing about Culture/Society
Spring 2021  12824 060SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Sarah StortiTuTh 9:30am - 10:45am Web-Based Course
 Students in this ENWR will read and write four different kinds of letters over the course of the semester: personal letters, letters of advice, cover letters, and satirical letters. We will identify and discuss the various elements of each subgenre of letter, and we will practice using concrete details in description, emphasizing writerly credibility, and making persuasive arguments.
 ENWR 1520Writing and Critical Inquiry: Community Engagement
 Where We Live: Writing About Housing Equity
Spring 2021  14047 001SEM (3 Units)Open 15 / 18Sarah StephensonTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pm Web-Based Course
 Why do we live where we do? How does housing impact our access to education, food, medical care, and other resources? What can the local built environment tell us about access to housing? Why are some people homeless? What is affordable housing and why is there so little of it? By partnering with The Haven, a day shelter for people experiencing homelessness in Charlottesville, and using different types of writing, including journal entries, forum posts, peer reviews, and formal papers, we will explore topics like homelessness, affordable housing, privilege, food insecurity, the eviction crisis, systems of power, and community engagement. We will also work with The Haven Writer's Circle to produce an online zine at the end of the semester. This course depends on the intersection between learning in the academic classroom and working with our community partner, The Haven. As part of this course, students will have the opportunity to work with The Haven either in person or virtually for 1-2 hours per week (up to a total of 12 hours for the semester). Scheduling and transportation (if in-person) will be organized and managed by Madison House and the professor.
 You Are What You Eat…or Are You?: Writing About Food Equity
Spring 2021  14048 002SEM (3 Units)Open 17 / 18Sarah StephensonTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 Why do we eat what we eat? Do poor people eat more fast food than wealthy people? Why do men like to eat steak more than women? Why are Cheetos cheaper than cherries? Do you have to be skinny to be hungry? By partnering with a local community garden and using different types of writing, including journal entries, forum posts, peer reviews, and formal papers, we will explore topics like hunger stereotypes, privilege, food insecurity, food production, and community engagement.
 ENWR 2510Advanced Writing Seminar
 Writing About the Arts
 Exploratory Writing
Spring 2021  13046 002SEM (3 Units)Closed 16 / 16James SeitzMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm New Cabell Hall 323
 This is a HYBRID seminar that will meet in person on Tuesdays & online on Thursdays. Click on course # for description.
 In this seminar, you’ll read and write a variety of genres that explore personal experiences and public issues from a wide range of perspectives. Each week you’ll read published writers whose work might serve as models for your own, and as this is a course in which the writing produced by you and your classmates is what matters most, you’ll regularly share your own work and respond to that of others. Writing assignments will be frequent, usually brief, and often experimental. If you’d like to break away from the five-paragraph, intro-body-conclusion formula for writing an essay, you may find this course appealing.
 ENWR 2520Special Topics in Writing
 Home Movies
Spring 2021  13055 007SEM (3 Units)Closed 16 / 16Sarah O'BrienMoWeFr 1:00pm - 1:50pm Web-Based Course
 This class will meet synchronously on Wednesdays, and asynchronously on Mondays and Fridays (you will have individual and/or group work due on those days).
 Of the many changes wrought by the pandemic, perhaps none will prove as enduring as the upending of our sense of being “at home.” We will consider the shifting dimensions of domestic space in the time of COVID-19 and the preceding century by watching, making, and writing about different kinds of “home movies”: amateur movies that document family life, fiction films that envision home in striking ways, and reality television and documentary film. Exploring these genres will give us occasion to think and write about the values of documenting family and everyday life, the pleasures and comforts of home-viewing practices, and film’s power to (re-)shape social structures and practices. By working with a community partner on a collective filmmaking and/or screening project, we will also expand our understanding of home to encompass not just the four-walled container of the nuclear family but also more diffuse physical and/or virtual communities.
 ENWR 2800Public Speaking
 Section 3 of ENWR 2800 Public Speaking has a co-requisite 1-credit Contemplative Lab (RELG 1559-001)
Spring 2021  12821 003SEM (3 Units)Open 12 / 16devin donovanTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm Bryan Hall 235
 Section 003 of ENWR 2800 Public Speaking (12821) is paired with a one-credit Contemplative Lab-- RELG 1559-001 (19218) -- run by the Contemplative Sciences Center. Please enroll in RELG 1559-001 to enroll in ENWR 2800-003. Add both courses to your shopping cart and then click enroll, this should add them to your schedule simultaneously. Email devin donovan (djd5b@virginia.edu) or Karolyn Kinane (kk7av@virginia.edu) with any questions.
 ENWR 3500Topics in Advanced Academic Writing
 Writing the Anthropocene
 Studies in Environmental Writing
Spring 2021  13047 001WKS (3 Units)Open 8 / 16Cory ShamanTuTh 9:30am - 10:45am Web-Based Course
 Students will examine the shortcomings of traditional environmental rhetoric as a means of discovering and developing more ethical strategies of representing the world, the environmental problems we face, and the healing that is necessary and possible. Thus, as a course in critical discursive remediation, “Writing the Anthropocene” offers students an opportunity to practice writing that responsibly engages the range of intersecting human-driven socio-ecological damages that define the Anthropocene. The course will pay special attention to claims that naming our moment “The Anthropocene” both encourages meaningful re-evaluations of our ecological relations and enables writing that mobilizes caring, effective environmental action. We’ll read conventional environmental texts (mainly non-fiction), explore theory related to the Anthropocene, and focus on provocative new writing that navigates our current ecological crises. Students will gain experience as readers of these texts and apply insights to a variety of writing tasks shaped by their specific interests.
 ENWR 3620Writing & Tutoring Across Cultures
Spring 2021  18696 001SEM (3 Units)Permission 14 / 16Kate KostelnikTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pm Web-Based Course
 In this course, we’ll look at a variety of texts from academic arguments, narratives, and pedagogies, to consider what it means to write, communicate, and learn across cultures. Topics will include contrastive rhetorics, world Englishes, rhetorical listening, and tutoring multilingual writers. An engaged-learning component will require students to virtually tutor students in my first-year writing courses. We will discuss pedagogies and practical, strengths-based strategies in working with multi-lingual learners on their writing; tutor first-years; and create writing projects that convey learning from these experiences. While the course will specifically prepare students to tutor multilingual writers, these skills are adaptable and applicable across disciplines and discourses. Our techniques and pedagogies will also be applicable to native-speakers. Basically, students will learn how to use dialogic engagement to support collaboration and conversation across cultures. Self-designed final writing projects will give students from various majors—education, public policy, commerce, social sciences, and STEM—the opportunity to combine their specific discourse knowledge with our course content. Additionally, students who successfully complete the course are invited to apply to work on the UVa writing center.
 ENWR 3900Career-Based Writing and Rhetoric
 Forbes Seminar in Professional Writing
Spring 2021  14087 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 12 / 16Jon D'ErricoMoWeFr 1:00pm - 1:50pm Web-Based Course
 This class prepares you for the leap from student writing to problem-solving writing in business and the professions. Here, we'll extend your range as writers, give you strategies that will also improve your writing in your remaining undergraduate courses, and make you more efficient and effective editors. Most suitable for students in years 2-4 who are already fairly strong writers, this class satisfies the second writing requirement.
French
 FREN 3030Phonetics
Spring 2021  11633 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 12 / 18Gladys SaundersTuTh 9:30am - 10:45am Web-Based Course
 FREN 3030 is an introductory course in French phonetics. It provides basic concepts in articulatory phonetics and phonological theory, and offers students techniques for improving their own pronunciation. The course will cover the physical characteristics of individual French sounds, the relationship between French sounds and their written representation (orthography), the rules governing the pronunciation of "standard French", the most salient phonological features of selected French varieties, phonetic differences between French and English sounds, and ‘la musique du français’, i.e., prosodic phenomena (le rythme, l’accent, l’intonation, la syllabation). Practical exercises in 'ear-training' (the perception of sounds) and 'phonetic transcription' (using IPA) are also essential components of this dynamic course. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FREN 2020 (or equivalent). Counts for major/minor credit in French and in Linguistics.
 FREN 3032Text, Image, Culture
 Contemplative reading and writing
Spring 2021  12059 002SEM (3 Units)Open 14 / 16Amy OgdenTuTh 9:30am - 10:45am Web-Based Course
 This section will explore ways of using contemplative practices to - become more observant of how French-speaking artists (authors, filmmakers, poets, etc.) communicate through diverse media; - rebalance writing habits to transform anxieties into productive energy; - discover the joys of reading in French and sharing one's enjoyment with others both orally and in writing.
 Représentations de l’islam en France
Spring 2021  12060 003SEM (3 Units)Open 7 / 16Mary AllenTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 Ce cours offre l’opportunité d’étudier des représentations de l’islam en France surtout à notre époque moderne. Pourtant, on aura la chance d’étudier l'histoire, des sources de théorie et de littérature, concernant des questions de société qui touchent au sécularisme, à la religiosité et au multiculturalisme en France. En prêtant notre attention aux représentations de l’islam dans des films, des textes littéraires, des informations, et des sources de culture populaire, nous allons considérer les images des musulman.ne.s en France aujourd’hui. Je vous encourage également à discuter des parallèles et des différences que vous apercevez entre la société française et d’autres sociétés dans le monde. Dans ce cours vous aurez l’occasion de vous familiariser des sources en relation avec notre thème, mais vous êtes libres de vous intéresser à d’autres aspects de nos sources. En développant votre esprit critique et vos capacités d’analyse textuelle, soyez ouverts à partager vos idées et vos aperçus avec tout le monde. Ce colloque exige une participation très active. In this course, students will discover and engage critically with a broad sampling of French and Francophone cultural production representing a variety of periods, genres, approaches, and media. Students will read, view, write about and discuss a range of works that may include poetry, painting, prose, music, theater, films, graphic novels, photographs, essays, and historical documents. Prerequisite: FREN 3031.
 Femmes de la Révolution Droits, pouvoirs, et devoirs : La femme et le genre au dix-huitième siècle
Spring 2021  19558 004SEM (3 Units)Open 11 / 16Mary AllenTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pm Web-Based Course
 Quelle était la place de la femme dans la société à l’époque où l’on déclare les droits de « l’Homme » ? Est-ce qu’il y avait une fluidité de genre ? À travers des textes de plusieurs « genres » littéraires, des œuvres artistiques, et un film basé sur un roman, nous allons aborder le sujet du genre au siècle des lumières. Dans ce cours vous aurez l’occasion de vous familiariser avec la littérature, l'histoire et la culture en France au début de la période moderne.Vous allez pouvoir discuter de parallèles et de différences que vous apercevez entre le dix-huitième et notre temps. Dans ce cours vous aurez l’occasion de vous familiariser des sources en relation avec notre thème, mais vous êtes libres de vous intéresser à d’autres aspects de nos sources. En développant votre esprit critique et vos capacités d’analyse textuelle, soyez ouverts à partager vos idées et vos aperçus avec tout le monde. In this course, students will discover and engage critically with a broad sampling of French and Francophone cultural production representing a variety of periods, genres, approaches, and media. Students will read, view, write about and discuss a range of works that may include poetry, painting, prose, music, theater, films, graphic novels, photographs, essays, and historical documents. Prerequisite: FREN 3031.
 FREN 3034Advanced Oral Expression in French
Spring 2021  18852 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 16 / 18Gladys SaundersTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pm Web-Based Course
 Contemporary Culture in Conversation This course will allow students to learn and reflect on issues that are of immediate concern to their francophone contemporaries. Class resources will include French online newspapers, magazines, radio, and television. Topics to be discussed will be largely based on student-driven interests, but likely topics will include education, family life, business culture, immigration, the arts, and Franco-American relations. In addition to engaged involvement in class discussions, students will be graded based on in-class presentations (individual and group), an audio and/or video contribution to a class web-journal, and a final oral exam.
 FREN 3043The French-Speaking World III: Modernities
 Tradition et innovation
Spring 2021  18853 001SEM (3 Units)Open 16 / 18Claire LyuTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 Ce cours vous invite à réfléchir sur les questions essentielles qui se trouvent au cœur de toute entreprise humaine qui tente de créer une œuvre artistique et/ou intellectuelle: comment faire surgir le nouveau de l'ancien, l'originalité de l'imitation, le singulier du conformisme? Ainsi, nous explorerons la relation entre la tradition et l'innovation à travers les écrivains, les artistes et les penseurs modernes qui ont façonné leurs œuvres en dialogue explicit avec le passé et la voix des autres. Que pouvons-nous apprendre, par exemple, de l'écrivain franco-chinois Cheng qui, élu à l'Académie française, écrit en un français qui est traversé par la langue et la pensée chinoises?; ou de la philosophe belge Despret qui reprend la thèse cartésienne du 17ème siècle sur la supériorité des hommes sur les animaux et la resitue dans le contexte éthique, féministe et écologique de nos jours?; ou du musicien belgo-rwandais Stromae qui transpose en performance du 21ème siècle (vidéo/youtube et concert) la chanson de l'opéra de Bizet qui, à son tour, puise dans la nouvelle de Mérimée du 19ème siècle?
 FREN 3559New Course in French Literature and General Linguistics
 French for Global Development
 French for Global Development
Spring 2021  19068 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed18 / 18Karen JamesMoWeFr 11:00am - 11:50am Contact Department
 Designed for students seeking to develop advanced linguistic skills in oral and written French and cultural competence in preparation for careers related to global development. Readings, discussions, and assignments revolve around case studies and simulated work-related situations drawn from real-life global development initiatives, with a focus this semester on francophone West African countries. Topics will include economic development, community health, and education. Course pre-requisite: FREN 3031 (This course is not intended for students who are native speakers of French.)
 FREN 3585Topics in Cultural Studies
 Women's Work: Women, Literature, and Society
Spring 2021  18854 002Lecture (3 Units)Closed18 / 18Elizabeth HallMoWeFr 1:00pm - 1:50pm Web-Based Course
 Simone de Beauvoir famously wrote that, “On ne naît pas femme: on le devient.” What does it mean to be a woman? How do women define, defy, and redefine their place in society? This course considers French and Francophone women’s works of literature and film through the examination of the domestic sphere and conventions that have traditionally defined women’s places and roles. We will study autobiographical and fictional accounts of women's lives, conventions, transgressions (of gender, sexuality, language, morality, norms), and debates on/about women, women’s space, the feminine, the domestic, and feminism. Course texts will include essays, films, short stories, and novels from a variety of time periods and French and Francophone cultures. Students will participate actively in class discussion, collaborate on a group research presentation, write short reaction papers, a midterm and a final paper. Online Synchronous. Course conducted in French.
 FREN 4580Advanced Topics in Literature
 Philosophes Noirs/Black Philosophers in French
 Black Philosophers in French
Spring 2021  18857 001SEM (3 Units)Open 9 / 18Ferial BoutaghouMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pm Monroe Hall 111
 Black philosophers from the Caribbean adopted a critical perspective in French. They have questioned for decades aporias and blind spots of our history. Historically many of them are from the Caribbean. We will read together in French texts by: Frantz Fanon (1925-1961), Aimé Césaire (1913-2008), Edouard Glissant (1928-2011), Patrick Chamoiseau (1953-) and see how they paved thinking of race and colonialism. We will analyze their system in light of the debate about race in the US and in France.
 FREN 4582Advanced Topics in French Poetry
 Baudelaire and French Modernity
 Baudelaire et la modernité
Spring 2021  18858 001Lecture (3 Units)Open15 / 18Claire LyuTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pm Web-Based Course
 Dans ce cours, nous lirons une sélection de textes de Baudelaire (Les Fleurs du mal, Les Petits poèmes en prose, Les Paradis artificiels, et les critiques d'art) pour apprécier l'ensemble de la production littéraire de l'un des poètes les plus célébrés dans la culture occidentale. Nous procèderons par des lectures et des analyses attentives pour examiner la sensibilité et l'esthétique baudelairiennes: le mal et l'éthique de la poésie, la structure et la déstructuration de la forme poétique, l’inspiration et la lucidité dans l'entreprise poétique. De façon plus générale, nous nous intéresserons à la nature et au pouvoir du langage poétique et réfléchirons sur la relation entre le langage poétique et le langage quotidiens ainsi que sur la fonction que peut avoir la poésie dans notre vie.
 FREN 4585Advanced Topics in Cultural Studies
 Getting Medieval on the Movies
Spring 2021  12062 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 15 / 18Amy OgdenTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pm Web-Based Course
 Why isn’t Jamie Foxx cast as Robin Hood, or Zoe Saldana as Lancelot, or Michelle Yeoh as Merlin? When we’re dealing in myths, why do some ideas of “historical realism” seem to matter... and how sure are we that we know what medieval European society really looked like? When we imagine the world of over a thousand years ago, why do 1950s (or even 21st-century) race and gender dynamics so often structure it? Why does it matter how we retell important myths in popular culture anyway? Writers and artists of the Middle Ages often didn’t share our worries about historical accuracy in representation and gave us the lasting legacies of a white Jesus and a pink-cheeked Virgin Mary—even if regional alternatives in fact existed with various degrees of cultural (in)sensitivity. What legacies are we passing down to future generations in our retellings of stories about Robin Hood, the Holy Grail, and Lancelot’s illicit love for Guenevere? Who benefits from perpetuating a singular image of the Middle Ages? Is there a future for different ways of using these stories, as in the work of French rapper Black M or American artist S. Ross Browne? This class will look at such stories as told in medieval French texts (in modern French translation) and modern stage and screen adaptations, such as the 2012 musical “Robin des Bois” and classics like Rohmer’s 1964 Perceval. For cultural contrast, we may also examine a few Anglo adaptations (like Monty Python and the Holy Grail / “Spamalot,” Black Knight, and the 2018 Robin Hood). No previous study of film required.
 The theme of the double in literature and film.
 The Theme of the Double in Literature and Film
Spring 2021  18859 002Lecture (3 Units)Closed18 / 18John LyonsTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 The theme of the double, known also as the Doppelgänger, has existed in the literature and in the culture of many civilizations since antiquity. This theme is often related to death and to the fear of a malevolent being who returns in the shape of someone who has not been properly buried. French literature and film contain important examples of doubles, and the work of cultural anthropologist and literary critic René Girard has given renewed vigor to this concept. This course will study doubles and doubling in some of the following novels, stories, plays, and films: Corneille, Le Menteur; Gautier, La Morte amoureuse; Green, Le Voyageur sur la terre; Grimonprez, Double Take; Kieslowski, La Double vie de Véronique; M.M. de Lafayette, Zayde, histoire espagnole; Molière, Amphytrion; Maupassant, Le Horla; Resnais, Hiroshima mon amour; Vigne, Le Retour de Martin Guerre. For purposes of comparison, we may also consider Hoffmann, The Doppelgänger; Poe, William Wilson; Stevenson, The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde; Wilde, The Portrait of Dorian Gray. Three papers, short quizzes, active participation in discussion, and an oral presentation.
 Joan of Arc from Medieval to Modern Times
Spring 2021  18860 003Lecture (3 Units)Open15 / 18Deborah McGradyMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 Joan of Arc looms large in French cultural memory, but her status changes (often dramatically) according to place and time. According to who is telling her story, she can appear as warrior or victim, saint or heretic, trailblazer or follower, feminist or traditionalist, spiritually inspired or mentally unstable. No two accounts of Joan are alike. How are we to understand this diversity of opinion and the continued debate surrounding Joan’s story that places her among the top ten historical figures in world history most often treated by writers and artists? This course will examine Joan’s legendary status as it is developed in legal, artistic, historical, and religious works from medieval to modern times. Instead of seeking out the historical “truth” or artistic “faithfulness” of these accounts, we will examine how these works speak to their own cultural moment. To explore this issue, the first half of the semester will focus on contemporary writings that range from letters of Italian merchants, opinions of theologians, and poems of praise about Joan to multiple legal inquiries into her case, including the trial that culminated with her 1431 execution. Thereafter, we will explore key cultural moments when Joan’s story re-emerges in French society, beginning with the “epic failure” of early modern writers to make of her a heroic figure. We will then examine her troubled “life” as a national hero in post-Revolution France before closing with a study of her conflicting modern status as a saint (she was canonized in 1920), as a political mascot, and as an international feminist icon outside of France. Student work will include short essays, presentations on assigned topics, and for the most ambitious students, research projects that match their interests (possible research topics include legal history, medicine or theology; Joan’s depiction in painting, sculpture, cinema, theatre; her use in modern French politics or her role on the international stage). Taught in French.
 FREN 4838French Society and Civilization
 La France contemporaine
Spring 2021  13885 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Janet HorneTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm Web-Based Course
 Developing cultural literacy is an integral part of becoming an educated citizen of the world. The attainment of cultural literacy includes understanding social norms as well as politics and current events in a particular country. In France, cultural literacy is particularly valued in professional life, where the expectation is that you will be able to converse on a wide range of topics outside your field of specialization. This course is designed to provide you with some tools for developing cultural literacy in the French context. Through an introduction to the politics, culture, and society of present-day France, you should come away from this class with a deeper understanding of social norms and institutional structures, as well as the ability to follow and understand French media coverage of events as they unfold in France. In your future travels in the US or abroad, you should feel comfortable discussing and debating social, political, and cultural issues and current events relating to France. To achieve those goals, we will study the evolution of French society, politics, and culture from the end of the Second World War until the present. We will study major social problems facing contemporary France: the role of women, education, immigration, race, religion, public health as well as France's status in the European Union. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on readings from the French press, the televised news, and other visual sources. Prerequisite: one 3000-level course beyond FREN 3032
 FREN 5540Topics in Eighteenth-Century Literature
 Telling Stories in the 18th Century
 Telling stories in the 18th Century
Spring 2021  18862 001SEM (3 Units)Open4 / 18 (9 / 18)Jennifer TsienTh 3:30pm - 6:00pm Web-Based Course
 In this course we will look at eighteenth-century novels, with particular focus on the roman à tiroir (1001 Nuits), the epistolary novel, the conte philosophique (Candide), and the deconstructed plot of Jacques le Fataliste. Students will get an overview of the history of the novel and they will analyze narrative techniques.
 FREN 5584Topics in Cinema
 Masterpieces of French Cinema
Spring 2021  19629 001SEM (3 Units)Open4 / 18 (8 / 18)Ari BlattTu 3:30pm - 6:00pm Web-Based Course
 This seminar aims to introduce students to the rich history of French cinema, from its origins in the birth of photography and other proto-cinematic technologies in the nineteenth century, to the advent of digital film at the dawn of the twenty-first. Provides a broad overview of key movements and genres, as well as concurrent trends in film theory and criticism. Students will be invited to reflect closely on film form, and to consider each film in light of the socio-historical context within which it was produced. We will also consider best practices for undergraduate film course design and delivery. May include, but is not limited to, works by Lumière, Méliès, Feuillade, Gance, Buñuel/Dalì, Vigo, Carné, Renoir, Godard, Marker, Truffaut, Varda, Resnais, Chabrol, Tavernier, Besson, Pialat, Ozon, Kechiche, Cantet, Audiard, Asseyas, Desplechin, and Jeunet. Course taught primarily in French.
 FREN 8540Seminar in Eighteenth-Century Literature
 Telling Stories in the 18th Century
 Telling stories in the 18th Century
Spring 2021  18899 001SEM (3 Units)Open5 / 18 (9 / 18)Jennifer TsienTh 3:30pm - 6:00pm Web-Based Course
 In this course we will look at eighteenth-century novels, with particular focus on the roman à tiroir (1001 Nuits), the epistolary novel, the conte philosophique (Candide), and the deconstructed plot of Jacques le Fataliste. Students will get an overview of the history of the novel and they will analyze narrative techniques. Secondary readings will include theoretical approaches such as structuralism, reader reception, new developments in Orientalism, cognitive science, and the history of the book.
 FREN 8584Seminar in Cinema
 Masterpieces of French Cinema
Spring 2021  19630 001SEM (3 Units)Open 4 / 18 (8 / 18)Ari BlattTu 3:30pm - 6:00pm Web-Based Course
 This seminar aims to introduce students to the rich history of French cinema, from its origins in the birth of photography and other proto-cinematic technologies in the nineteenth century, to the advent of digital film at the dawn of the twenty-first. Provides a broad overview of key movements and genres, as well as concurrent trends in film theory and criticism. Students will be invited to reflect closely on film form, and to consider each film in light of the socio-historical context within which it was produced. We will also consider best practices for undergraduate film course design and delivery. May include, but is not limited to, works by Lumière, Méliès, Feuillade, Gance, Buñuel/Dalì, Vigo, Carné, Renoir, Godard, Marker, Truffaut, Varda, Resnais, Chabrol, Tavernier, Besson, Pialat, Ozon, Kechiche, Cantet, Audiard, Asseyas, Desplechin, and Jeunet. Course taught primarily in French.
French in Translation
 FRTR 3814Gender, Sexuality, Identity in Premodern France
Spring 2021  12383 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 9 / 30 (12 / 30)Deborah McGradyMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pm Web-Based Course
 If you imagine the Middle Ages as a far-off land occupied by only “knights in shining armor and damsels in distress,” think again. This course will open your eyes to a far more complex conversation about sexuality and gender that resonates in surprising ways with contemporary views. We will read in tandem medieval religious writings, medical works, and conduct manuals that set the stage for distinguishing between men and women based on their biological and behavioral “predispositions” alongside works of fiction that challenged these official stances. Among our readings will be letters exchanged between one-time lovers, a church leader and abbess, that recount in real time their efforts to think through the different expectations placed on them as church figures. Poetry, romance, and travel narratives that treat the Christian West’s encounter with other religions, races, and ethnicities will further reveal the fault lines that destabilize rigid binary treatment of the sexes. The thirteenth-century romance of a young girl raised to adulthood as a boy will provide ample treatment of how our medieval counterparts struggled with the notion that “biology is destiny.” Finally, the work of the first feminist and professional writer of Europe, Christine de Pizan, who composed the first manifesto written by women in their defense, will help us fully appreciate the challenges faced then and now when breaking down gendered expectations. Through our reading of these fascinating works, it is hoped that students will acquire a thicker and more nuanced appreciation of the long history of gender, sexuality, and identity. No pre-requisites - class discussions will introduce students both to medieval culture and to the basic tenets of gender theory. Graded work will include short critical engagement and creative responses to readings, class discussions and presentations, and written exams. The second-writing requirement can be fulfilled with this course (requires instructor permission). Lectures and readings are in English.
German
 GERM 3000Advanced German
 Identity and Belonging
Spring 2021  11895 001SEM (3 Units)Open 10 / 18Julia GuttermanMoWeFr 10:00am - 10:50am Web-Based Course
 What does it mean to be German? What shapes our identities? When do we belong? In this content-based advanced language course, we will investigate questions of identities and belonging in Germany. Among other topics, we will learn about the Afro-German movement and read the work of Afro-German activist and poet May Ayim. We will explore the graphic novel ‘Heimat,’ penned by German-born author Nora Krug, who decides to leave New York and face the Nazi-past of her home country and family. Grammar topics and language skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing will be addressed within the context of these materials. The course is designed for students at the intermediate level and will provide a systematic overview of German grammar at the upper intermediate level, with emphasis on sentence structure, and selectively target grammar topics at the advanced level. Prerequisite GERM 2020 or GERM 2050 or instructor’s permission.
 Identity and Belonging
Spring 2021  19464 002SEM (3 Units)Open 11 / 18Julia GuttermanMoWeFr 11:00am - 11:50am Web-Based Course
 What does it mean to be German? What shapes our identities? When do we belong? In this content-based advanced language course, we will investigate questions of identities and belonging in Germany. Among other topics, we will learn about the Afro-German movement and read the work of Afro-German activist and poet May Ayim. We will explore the graphic novel ‘Heimat,’ penned by German-born author Nora Krug, who decides to leave New York and face the Nazi-past of her home country and family. Grammar topics and language skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing will be addressed within the context of these materials. The course is designed for students at the intermediate level and will provide a systematic overview of German grammar at the upper intermediate level, with emphasis on sentence structure, and selectively target grammar topics at the advanced level. Prerequisite GERM 2020 or GERM 2050 or instructor’s permission.
 GERM 3120Literature in German I
Spring 2021  12890 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 9 / 15Julia GuttermanMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 Does fiction even have a point? Are robots a thing – and what makes them so uncanny? And how do I know what to do or who to be? 200 years ago, these questions pressed philosophers, writers, and artists to create some of the greatest works in the German language. Today, these questions still shape our lived experience, igniting controversial debates about social issues. In “Literature in German I” we focus on 3 texts penned during the 18th and 19th centuries: an essay, a play, and a short novel. We critically approach these texts through group activities, discussions, short presentations, creative writing, and cultural analysis. Together we discover how these texts from the past find new shapes in contemporary film and theatre productions—and we investigate their connections to current debates and issues such as, for example, the #MeToo movement or Berlin’s decolonization movement. ‘Literature in German I’ is conducted entirely in German. Prerequisite: GERM 3010. If you haven’t completed GERM 3010, but are interested in taking this course, please contact me # jg4mt@virginia.edu
 GERM 4600Fourth-Year Seminar
Spring 2021  19462 001Lecture (3 Units)Open5 / 12Jeffrey GrossmanTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pm Web-Based Course
 GERM 4600 may be repeated for credit. Fourth-year standing not required.
 GERM 4600: Fourth Year Seminar: Jahrhundertwende The Jahrhundertwende was a period of profound contradiction: Imperial rule and nationalist challenges to empire, vast accumulation of wealth and a growing proletariat, strict bourgeois morality and unleashed sexual energies, liberal sentiments and the rise of seething, pent up forces, both liberatory and reactionary. It was a period of confidence in the future and cultural despair. This seminar explores how writers and artists around 1900 responded to this world of contradiction, producing bold artistic and literary experiments (Jugendstil, Expressionism, Dada, etc.) and giving expression to varied sensibilities (fin de siècle, Dekadenz, Menschheitsdämmerung). Together we will explore how these writers related to new thinkers and styles of thought—positivist philosophy, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, and others. What, they asked, was the nature of “reality” and of the “self,” if they existed at all? And what comes from plumbing the unconscious, its forms and desires? Where the political and social worlds headed toward doom? Or toward renaissance? In what ways were fundamental assumptions about life called into question? And what assumptions were left unexamined? Readings by Freud, Nietzsche, Wedekind, Schnitzler, Th. Mann, Kafka, Rilke, Lou Andreas-Salomé, Else Lasker-Schüler, and others. Taught in German.
German in Translation
 GETR 3559New Course in German in Translation
 Pursuing Happiness
 Pursuing Happiness
Spring 2021  20440 001SEM (3 Units)Permission 0 / 20 (10 / 20)Lorna MartensTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
  Pursuing Happiness Fictions of happiness pursued--and found! Through the ages, people have sought happiness and formulated conceptions of what happiness means. Happiness could be something we once had--then lost--but might find again; something we might achieve by acting wisely or performing meritorious deeds; something possible through escape; alternatively, something available in the here and now; bound up with love or recognition from others; or a byproduct of creativity, independent of others. This course is not a self-help course. Don’t take it expecting to find the key to happiness. This is a literature course. We’ll read fiction, poetry, theory. But we will read some cheerful and uplifting (or at least moderately cheerful or uplifting) literature, as an intellectual antidote to the gloom and doom of the current pandemic, while we wait for a scientific antidote. Texts to be chosen from Chrétien, Rousseau, Schiller, Novalis, Wordsworth, Emerson, Valéry, Hunt, Rilke, Hilton, Stevens, Giono, Nabokov, I. Grekova, Wolf.
 GETR 3710Kafka and His Doubles
Spring 2021  19465 001SEM (3 Units)Permission 1 / 20 (15 / 20)Lorna MartensTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm Web-Based Course
 The course will introduce the enigmatic work of Franz Kafka: stories including "The Judgment," "The Metamorphosis," "A Country Doctor," "A Report to an Academy," "A Hunger Artist," "The Burrow," and "Josephine the Singer, or the Mouse Folk"; one of his three unpublished novels (The Trial); the Letter to His Father; and some short parables. But we will also look at Kafka's "doubles": the literary tradition he works with and the way in which he, in turn, forms literary tradition. Thus: Kafka: Cervantes, Kafka: Bible, Kafka: Aesop, Kafka: Dostoevsky, Kafka: Melville; Kafka: O'Connor, Kafka: Singer; Kafka: Calvino, Kafka: Borges. Readings will center on four principal themes: conflicts with others and the self (and Kafka's psychological vision); the double; the play with paradox and infinity; and artists and animals. A seminar limited to 17 participants. Requirements include a short midterm paper (5-7 pages) and a longer final paper (10-12 pages).
Graduate Nursing
 GNUR 5230Ethical and Legal Issues in Health Care
Spring 2021  17207 001SEM (2 - 3 Units)Open 23 / 30Ashley HurstTu 3:30pm - 5:10pm Claude Moore Nursing Educ G010
 This course is open to undergraduate and graduate students of any major or degree program. No clinical background or experience is needed. We will engage major healthcare issues using legal and ethical lenses.
Global Studies-Global Studies
 GSGS 2559New Course in Global Studies
 Critical Conceptions of the Global
Spring 2021  19640 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 33 / 40Helena ZeweriTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm Web-Based Course
 This lecture course examines leading schools of thought in Global Studies from a critical perspective. Students will engage with foundational concepts that underpin contemporary economic, cultural, and political institutions of power. The course brings together material from anthropology, political theory, and cultural studies.
 GSGS 3559New Course in Global Studies
 Migrant Women's Political Activism
Spring 2021  20413 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 29 / 30Helena ZeweriTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pm Web-Based Course
 This course examines the tools, ideas, and practices of migrant-women led political activism both historically and in the present-day. We look at the ways in which women throughout the world have organized and mobilized around a range of causes and ideas, from political inclusion to decolonization to racial justice to reproductive freedom, among many others. Through examining the writings of migrant women activists alongside texts and media in anthropology, history, and cultural theory, we ask what such efforts can teach us about migrant women's roles in long-standing struggles for human flourishing and equality.
Global Studies-Security and Justice
 GSSJ 4559New Seminar in Global Security and Justice
 Ethnographies of Global Policing
Spring 2021  19642 001SEM (3 Units)Open 7 / 20Helena ZeweriTu 3:30pm - 6:00pm Web-Based Course
 This discussion-based seminar delves into how power, control, and governance work in carceral systems, border control infrastructures, digital spaces, and other sites of social control within different national contexts. We ask what can an ethnographic perspective allow us to understand about the lived experiences of mobility, privacy, and injustice today?
History-European History
 HIEU 1502Introductory Seminar in Post-1700 European History
 The Berlin Wall: Spies and Lies in a Cold War City
Spring 2021  12248 001SEM (3 Units)Closed 15 / 15Kyrill KunakhovichMo 3:30pm - 6:00pm Web-Based Course
 The Berlin Wall is now a global symbol of division. It is invoked in policy debates about US immigration; its fall has become synonymous with the end of the Cold War; its fragments are preserved as monuments to the human spirit – including right here at UVA. But what was the Berlin Wall, exactly? Why did it go up, and how did it work? What did it divide, and what got through? Why did it fall when it did – and what legacy did it leave behind? This course examines the rise, fall, and afterlives of the Berlin Wall, from the end of the Second World War to the present day. We will consider who built the Berlin Wall; how it divided a united city; and how ordinary people learned to live with the barrier in their midst. We will also explore the shadowy world of spies, lies, and border crossings that sprung up around the Wall, on the front lines of the Cold War. Finally, we examine who, or what, brought down the Berlin Wall in 1989, as well as the many ways in which it still lives on today. This course will double as an introduction to historical method. We will look at a wide range of sources, including films, novels, memoirs, newspaper reports, and case files kept by the Secret Police. We will also pay particular attention to developing writing skills: over the course of the semester, students will write several types of papers, including a film review, a primary source analysis, a diary entry, and an op-ed.
 HIEU 9037Tutorial in Central and Eastern European History
Spring 2021  20668 001SEM (3 Units)Open5 / 6Kyrill KunakhovichTBA TBA
 This course introduces students to the modern history of Central and Eastern Europe. We will consider topics like the rise of nationalism, the challenges of state-building, the spread of left- and right-wing ideologies, interactions with the "West," and the experience of war and revolution. The class will meet on Tuesdays from 10 to 11:30am.
History-Middle Eastern History
 HIME 2002The Making of the Modern Middle East
 Most lectures will be asynchronous with Zoom meeting times for activities and discussion
Spring 2021  13614 100Lecture (4 Units)Open 58 / 60Chris GratienTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pm Web-Based Course
 What are the historical processes that have shaped the Middle East of today? This course focuses on the history of a region stretching from Morocco in the West and Afghanistan in the East over the period of roughly 1500 to the present. In doing so, we examine political, social, and cultural history through the lens of "media" in translation, such as manuscripts, memoirs, maps, travel narratives, novels, films, music, internet media, and more.
History-General History
 HIST 2559New Course in General History
 Fascism: A Global History
Spring 2021  18731 100Lecture (3 Units)Open 33 / 60 (34 / 60)Kyrill Kunakhovich+1MoWe 10:00am - 10:50am TBA
 This class investigates fascism as an ideology, movement, and regime in a global framework. We will start our investigation with the cases of Mussolini’s Italy and Hitler’s Germany before broadening our perspective to Francoist Spain, Shōwa Statism in Japan, and more recent manifestations of (post-)fascist phenomena in the Latin America, Europe, the Middle East, and across the world. As we expand our understanding of the phenomenon, we will explore the regional inflections of fascism (such as the genocidal antisemitism of German National Socialism) and common characteristics (such fascism’s embrace of violence as a means of politics). Thematic perspectives include: the origins and theories of fascism, key terms in the fascist lexicon, motives that brought people to fascism, fascism as an aesthetics and lived experience, and the role of women in fascism. We will also study the historical articulations of antifascism, i.e. those groups and individuals who have fought against fascism over the years. Throughout this course, we will interrogate the term “fascism,” asking what it means - and what it means for us to use it. Today, politicians of all stripes deride their opponents as “fascists.” Is it possible to apply this term productively? How can we define fascism, and what are the stakes of using such language? Is there a difference between fascist, fascistic, and fascistoid? As Gertrude Stein famously asked, is there a there there?
 HIST 4501Major Seminar
 Antisemitism in Historical Perspective
Syllabus  18745 003SEM (4 Units)Permission 9 / 12James LoefflerTu 2:00pm - 4:30pm Web-Based Course
 Can hate be transhistorical? Can we speak of anti-Jewish hatred as a unique phenomenon that transcends the limits of time and space? How can it be that we live in a world suffused with antisemitism yet no one can agree on a satisfactory definition of this very word? This seminar explores the peculiar history of antisemitism and the puzzle of antisemitism as a historical problem. Through readings and research, students will examine the challenges and opportunities that the study of antisemitism presents for contemporary historical reasoning.
History-United States History
 HIUS 2559New Course in United States History
 Technologies of American Life
 Also AMST 2559
Spring 2021  19784 100Lecture (3 Units)Open 9 / 60 (40 / 60)David SingermanMoWe 10:00am - 10:50am Web-Based Course
 You might have learned the legends of genius inventors, but in this course we'll explore a different history: how technologies have shaped the lives of most Americans, and how ordinary Americans shaped our common technologies. We’ll explore topics like the amazing capabilities of pre-1492 civilizations, how enslaved people created new species of plants, how photography was like 19th-century time travel, and how Silicon Valley’s innovators may have copied schoolchildren from Minnesota.
 HIUS 3753The History of Modern American Law
 Appropriate for undergraduates at all levels: assumes no knowledge of law or US History
Spring 2021  18809 100Lecture (3 Units)Open 94 / 120Sarah MilovMoWe 12:00pm - 12:50pm Web-Based Course
 HIUS 3753: History of Modern American Law This course asks two interrelated questions: how has American society shaped law and how has law shaped American society since 1865. Understanding legal history means understanding the passage of laws, the lawsuits and trials that challenge the laws, the effects of the law on society, and the political history of efforts to change laws. If you study these dynamics for any major law in US History—say, for example, the 1964 Civil Rights Act or the Clean Air Act of 1970—you will soon develop a sophisticated understanding of how law shapes politics and social movements, and even the expectations and assumptions that we hold for our own lives. To understand this social life of law will require us to look at a variety of sources—statutes, legal briefs, and Supreme Court opinions, but also reports issued by the government and interest groups, journalism, narrative writing, and historical scholarship. Major themes to be addressed include the legal history of Jim Crow, economic regulation and the rise of the administrative state, labor and immigration, the regulation of speech and political dissent, the Civil Rights Movement, women’s rights, public health and the environment as subjects of regulation, criminal justice and the carceral state, and the role of lawyers in shaping political and social history. This course is intended for undergraduates at all levels: it assumes no knowledge of US history.
Italian in Translation
 ITTR 2260Dante in Translation
 Dante in Translation
Spring 2021  19563 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 10 / 18Deborah ParkerMoWe 4:00pm - 5:15pm New Cabell Hall 309
 T.S. Eliot wrote that “Dante and Shakespeare divide the world between them. There is no third.” We’ll pursue this bold statement through a close reading of the Inferno, the most intricate account of the afterlife ever written. This course will examine what makes this brilliant poem one of the acclaimed classics of western culture. We will explore the organization of Hell, its inhabitants, the relationship between sin and punishment, Dante’s Italy, and the rich tradition of visual material the poem has inspired from manuscript illustrations to Botticelli to more recent artists such as Gustave Doré and William Blake.
 ITTR 3280Michelangelo: The Artist, The Man, and His Times
 Michelangelo: The Artist, The Man, and His Times
Spring 2021  19831 001SEM (3 Units)Open 6 / 20 (11 / 20)Deborah ParkerMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm Nau Hall 211
 Michelangelo’s name conjures genius and a nearly superhuman achievement in the arts. Contemporaries elevated him as the supreme sculptor, painter and architect of the age. His work offers a window on a deeply personal vision and rich artistic culture. Michelangelo’s creativity extends to many media—sculpture, painting, architecture, and poetry. This course focuses on all these pursuits. We shall address topics such as how to represent the human figure, how to convey a story, how to show emotion, and how to represent space. Additional subjects include the social and cultural worlds of Renaissance Florence and Rome, the effects of patronage on artistic production, Michelangelo’s use of classical models, and his relationships with fellow artists, friends, and rivals. This course will enhance students’ ability to analyze visual and literary artifacts. This skill is crucial in our media age which relies on visual messages and the interplay of text and image. How does new media reimagine the past? How do creators adapt earlier masterpieces for contemporary audiences? The focus of this course is not only the extraordinary achievements of this Renaissance luminary but the ways in which we can analyze and compare visual and written works.
Japanese in Translation
 JPTR 3559New Course in Japanese in Translation
 Mishima Yukio: His Life, Literature, and Myth
 Literary Confessions: The Life and Myth of Mishima Yukio
Spring 2021  20133 001SEM (3 Units)Open 12 / 23 (12 / 23)Chad DiehlMo 2:00pm - 4:30pm Web-Based Course
 This course explores the life and myth of Mishima Yukio (1925-1970) through a deep engagement with his literature, including novels, short stories, and plays. We will also study a variety of issues that defined social discourse in the post-WWII era, including trauma, war memory, gender and sexuality, and tradition vs. modernity, to understand how Mishima and his work fit into postwar Japanese society.
Liberal Arts Seminar
 LASE 3400Writing and the World of Work
Spring 2021  13134 001SEM (3 Units)Open 6 / 14Matthew DavisMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 (for a detailed description, click on 13134 on the left)
 LASE 3400 Writing and the World of Work Spring 2021 Mr. Matthew Davis This course is for third- and fourth-year students who enjoy writing, have had some success as writers (either in classes or in extracurricular activities), and think they might like to pursue a career in which writing or editing features prominently. During the course of the semester, students will: 1. create, workshop, and revise key job-seeking materials, including a résumé and a cover letter 2. develop entry-level copyediting skills by reading much of The Copyeditor’s Handbook and completing exercises in the companion volume, The Copyeditor’s Workbook 3. tackle some writing tasks that have “real-world” relevance, e.g., writing a press release or a restaurant review 4. conduct an interview with a writer and edit the interview for publication 5. create from scratch or carefully revise one strong piece of writing (fictional or nonfictional) which can then be included in an online portfolio and shown to potential employers 6. meet and talk with 5-7 professionals who work in publishing, editing, publicity, journalism, or some other field related to the written word and will visit with our class (probably via Zoom) Please note that this is not an appropriate course for students looking for a remedial writing course. I expect that students who enroll will have a good command of the most important conventions of Standard English, including grammar, usage, spelling, capitalization, as well as a willingness to learn some of the finer points, like the difference between an em-dash and a hyphen and the difference between coordinate adjectives and cumulative adjectives. If your knowledge of grammar and the conventions of written English is shaky, or if you simply do not care much about questions of style, punctuation, and correctness, you are likely to find this course difficult and/or annoying. The instructor for this course, Matthew Davis, is a professor in the English Department who worked for more than a decade as an editor. After getting a Ph.D. in English from UVA in 2000, Davis worked as an editor, publications project manager, and freelance writer, mostly in K-8 education, before returning to UVA as a professor in 2015. This is an unusual course. Will it be a good course for you? To get a better sense of whether it might be, answer the following questions. 1. Do you enjoy writing – at least some of the time? 2. Have any of your professors at UVA told you write well? 3. Have you ever had a piece accepted for publication in a school publication, journal, or website? 4. Do you think you might like for writing to be a part of what you end up doing to make a living out there in “the real world”? 5. Are you the sort of person other people ask to proofread what they have written? 6. Do you enjoy reading things other people have written and making suggestions? 7. Would you be interested in learning copyediting and “proofreader’s marks”? 8. Have you ever read something, thought it was beautifully written, felt a pang of jealousy, and mumbled, “Damn! I wish I had written that”? 9. Do you know why the question mark in the last sentence appears outside of the quotation marks? (Or would you like to learn?) 10. Do you know the difference between an em-dash and a hyphen? (Or would you be interested in learning the difference?) 11. Do you know why most editors consider “moldy, slimy cheese” correct with a comma but consider “moldy cheddar cheese” correct without a comma? (Or would you like to learn why?) 12. Do you know why most editors would leave the clause “Jane Austen’s novel Pride and Prejudice is excellent” unchanged but would re-punctuate “Ralph Ellison’s novel Invisible Man is excellent”? (Or would you like to learn?) 13. Do you know why some people write “If I was you, I wouldn’t do that” while others write, “If I were you, I wouldn’t do that”? (Or would you like to learn?) 14. Would you like to try imitating some long but elegant sentences by great writers like Edward Gibbon, T.B. Macaulay, and Martin Luther King? 15. Would you like to try writing in some genres that may be new to you, like book review and/or press release? 16. Do you think you would enjoy taking a Sherlock Holmes story and trying to edit it so that it is 800 words shorter, has lower “readability” levels, and is more accessible for young readers? 17. Would you like to work on creating (or improving) your resume and your cover letter skills? 18. Do you have a piece that you have written (or one that you have been wanting to write) that you think would be a good piece to include in a portfolio of your written work? 19. Are you comfortable participating in workshops in which the goal is to help other people improve their writing? 20. If I took the trouble to invite a writer or editor to come and talk to our class (or chat via phone) would you ask him or her questions? 21. Do you think you will be comfortable taking a class that is not “about” a traditional subject like Russian history or French film but is only about writing? If you answered ‘yes’ to many or most of these questions, this might be a good course for you. If you answered ‘no’ to many or most of them, you might want to avoid this course. The professor can be reached at mmd6w@virginia.edu
Linguistics
 LING 4559New Course in Linguistics
 Linguistic Typology
Spring 2021  19954 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 13 / 20 (18 / 20)Armik MirzayanMo 5:00pm - 7:30pm Web-Based Course
 In Linguistic Typology we explore structures in languages by analyzing both differences and similarities in language systems across the world. This entails exploration of the methods and results of previous typological research, analysis of linguistic data in terms of these typological findings, and critical evaluation of some of the theoretical assumptions inherent to the methods and interpretation of linguistic typological data. Fulfills the Theory requirement for Linguistics majors and graduate students.
Leadership and Public Policy - Substantive
 LPPS 3380Poverty, Learning, and Education Policy
 
Spring 2021  17051 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 46 / 48Kristen RoorbachTuTh 9:30am - 10:45am Garrett Hall 100
  Discussion-based course w/a developmental examination of child poverty (multi-layer effects of history, culture,&geographic location). Examine: school reform efforts ("turnaround" schools, charter schools); implications of No Child Left Behind &2015 Every Student Succeeds Act; barriers (social isolation, violence, oppression, etc.) that contribute to failure of previous reform initiatives; education policies&proposals aiming to address these issues.
 Discussion-based course w/a developmental examination of child poverty (multi-layer effects of history, culture,&geographic location). Examine: school reform efforts ("turnaround" schools, charter schools); implications of No Child Left Behind &2015 Every Student Succeeds Act; barriers (social isolation, violence, oppression, etc.) that contribute to failure of previous reform initiatives; education policies&proposals aiming to address these issues.
 LPPS 4230US Mental Health Policy
Spring 2021  20439 001Lecture (3 Units)Open22 / 25 (22 / 25)Brooke LehmannTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm Contact Department
 Note: This course will now include the following topics: The impact of COVID, social determinants of health, and health disparities on our mental health system and the federal government's response.
Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering
 MAE 6592Special Topics in Mechanical and Aerospace Science: Intermediate Level
 Informatics for Materials and Mechanics
Spring 2021  19040 003Lecture (3 Units)Open6 / 15 (6 / 15)Prasanna BalachandranTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm Mechanical Engr Bldg 205
 Course Objectives: The central focus of this course will be to introduce the exciting field of informatics to the students of physical, chemical and mechanical sciences disciplines. One of the key objectives of this course is to inform, educate, and equip future scientists and engineers in more traditional disciplines with the skill set of data analytics. The physical, chemical and mechanical sciences, like computer, health, social and biological sciences, are at the cusp of a data revolution. In the last decade, we witnessed an unprecedented growth in the veracity, velocity, volume, and variety of data generated from diverse experimental and computational capabilities at multiple length and time scales. In this course, we will study the role of machine learning approaches in multivariate visualization, modeling, optimization, and control. The students will have plenty of opportunity to try various mathematical methods on diverse datasets and gain hands-on experience in machine learning. More formally, the course will cover the following topics. Uncover trends and patterns from diverse datasets using exploratory data analysis, visualization and unsupervised learning; Build structure (input)-property (output) relationships using supervised learning (regression and classification learning); Extract insights from non-linear models; Design of experiments and Optimal Design; Data-driven vs Science-driven Informatics (Bayesian inference); Importance of Uncertainty in building Surrogate Models. Computer software skills: Familiarity with Matlab, R, Python, JMP, SAS, SPSS, or Octave is expected. We will explore several off-the-shelf statistical learning and machine learning methods in this course. Students will run these algorithms on a variety of experimental and computational datasets and analyze the results. Reading Materials: No text book for this course; Relevant reading materials will be announced in advance before the class. Topics Covered (in no specific order): • Basic Probability and Statistics and Reproducible Research for Maintaining Highest Ethical Standards in Data Science Research • Exploratory Data Analysis/Multivariate Data Visualization • Unsupervised Learning: Cluster Analysis • Unsupervised Learning: Data-dimensionality reduction • Supervised Learning: Classification learning • Supervised Learning: Regression • Bayesian Inference • Design of Experiments and Optimal Design under Uncertainties • Semi-Supervised Learning and Multifidelity Modeling • Shallow learning vs Deep learning
Media Studies
 MDST 3505Special Topics in Diversity and Identity in Media
 Stars, Celebrities, and Fame
Spring 2021  18634 001SEM (3 Units)Closed 30 / 30Keara GoinTBA TBA
 Course Overview This course explores celebrity, stardom, fame, and self-branding as it is produced, circulated, and consumed. In examining the increasingly self-aware culture associated with celebrity, we will discuss the ways in which celebrity is conceived, constructed, performed, and discussed, as well as how it shapes notions of identity, and has reconfigured concepts of work, class, consumption, intimacy, authenticity, and the “American dream.” With an emphasis on media’s relationship to celebrity, we cover a broad range of topics and modes of analysis. Goals. At the end of this course, you will: 1.Understand the history of mediated celebrity in the United States 2.Know how to analyze the images of a celebrity 3.Analyze how aspects of identity, especially gender and race, connect to the construction of celebrity 4.Comprehend the meaning of celebrity in relation to ideology 5.Discern the industrial structures and discursive contexts of celebrity and media
 MDST 3584Global Cinema
 Japanese Cinema in Global Context
Spring 2021  13250 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 29 / 30Lori MorimotoTh 3:30pm - 6:00pm Web-Based Course
 This is the tentative schedule for this course - it is subject to change
 MDST 3720Social Media and Global South Societies
Spring 2021  14252 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 28 / 30Sayan BanerjeeTuTh 9:30am - 10:45am Clark Hall 107
 This course studies the relationship between social media, people, and politics in Global South societies. Social Media, aided by new technological revolutions, are often regarded with fear or awe; the purpose of this class is to break down the myths of social media and develop methods of analysis and critical understanding. To do this, we will draw from a broad range of multidisciplinary literature including political science, communications, anthropology and ICT for Development to analyze effects of social media on human behavior, activism, economic development, politics, identity, intergroup relations and violence.
Middle Eastern Studies
 MEST 2450Languages of Nationhood: Sociolinguistics in Israel
Spring 2021  20219 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 10 / 30Daniel LefkowitzMoWeFr 11:00am - 11:50am Web-Based Course
 This course looks at the social life of language in Israel. Beginning historically with the philosophical debates about language, identity, and nationhood swirling around the 19th century European Jewish communities, we examine how the revival of Hebrew contributed to the establishment of the Israeli state in the 20th century, and at how processes of language change have influenced political and aesthetic life in Israel today.
Materials Science and Engineering
 MSE 4592Special Topics in Materials Science
 Introduction to Materials Informatics
Spring 2021  16444 001Lecture (3 Units)Open1 / 5 (1 / 5)Prasanna BalachandranTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm Mechanical Engr Bldg 205
 Course Objectives: The central focus of this course will be to introduce the exciting field of informatics to the students of physical, chemical and mechanical sciences disciplines. One of the key objectives of this course is to inform, educate, and equip future scientists and engineers in more traditional disciplines with the skill set of data analytics. The physical, chemical and mechanical sciences, like computer, health, social and biological sciences, are at the cusp of a data revolution. In the last decade, we witnessed an unprecedented growth in the veracity, velocity, volume, and variety of data generated from diverse experimental and computational capabilities at multiple length and time scales. In this course, we will study the role of machine learning approaches in multivariate visualization, modeling, optimization, and control. The students will have plenty of opportunity to try various mathematical methods on diverse datasets and gain hands-on experience in machine learning. More formally, the course will cover the following topics. Uncover trends and patterns from diverse datasets using exploratory data analysis, visualization and unsupervised learning; Build structure (input)-property (output) relationships using supervised learning (regression and classification learning); Extract insights from non-linear models; Design of experiments and Optimal Design; Data-driven vs Science-driven Informatics (Bayesian inference); Importance of Uncertainty in building Surrogate Models. Computer software skills: Familiarity with Matlab, R, Python, JMP, SAS, SPSS, or Octave is expected. We will explore several off-the-shelf statistical learning and machine learning methods in this course. Students will run these algorithms on a variety of experimental and computational datasets and analyze the results. Reading Materials: No text book for this course; Relevant reading materials will be announced in advance before the class. Topics Covered (in no specific order): • Basic Probability and Statistics and Reproducible Research for Maintaining Highest Ethical Standards in Data Science Research • Exploratory Data Analysis/Multivariate Data Visualization • Unsupervised Learning: Cluster Analysis • Unsupervised Learning: Data-dimensionality reduction • Supervised Learning: Classification learning • Supervised Learning: Regression • Bayesian Inference • Design of Experiments and Optimal Design under Uncertainties • Semi-Supervised Learning and Multifidelity Modeling • Shallow learning vs Deep learning
 MSE 6592Topics in Material Science
 Introduction to Materials Informatics
Spring 2021  16445 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed 11 / 10 (11 / 10)Prasanna BalachandranTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm Mechanical Engr Bldg 205
 Course Objectives: The central focus of this course will be to introduce the exciting field of informatics to the students of physical, chemical and mechanical sciences disciplines. One of the key objectives of this course is to inform, educate, and equip future scientists and engineers in more traditional disciplines with the skill set of data analytics. The physical, chemical and mechanical sciences, like computer, health, social and biological sciences, are at the cusp of a data revolution. In the last decade, we witnessed an unprecedented growth in the veracity, velocity, volume, and variety of data generated from diverse experimental and computational capabilities at multiple length and time scales. In this course, we will study the role of machine learning approaches in multivariate visualization, modeling, optimization, and control. The students will have plenty of opportunity to try various mathematical methods on diverse datasets and gain hands-on experience in machine learning. More formally, the course will cover the following topics. Uncover trends and patterns from diverse datasets using exploratory data analysis, visualization and unsupervised learning; Build structure (input)-property (output) relationships using supervised learning (regression and classification learning); Extract insights from non-linear models; Design of experiments and Optimal Design; Data-driven vs Science-driven Informatics (Bayesian inference); Importance of Uncertainty in building Surrogate Models. Computer software skills: Familiarity with Matlab, R, Python, JMP, SAS, SPSS, or Octave is expected. We will explore several off-the-shelf statistical learning and machine learning methods in this course. Students will run these algorithms on a variety of experimental and computational datasets and analyze the results. Reading Materials: No text book for this course; Relevant reading materials will be announced in advance before the class. Topics Covered (in no specific order): • Basic Probability and Statistics and Reproducible Research for Maintaining Highest Ethical Standards in Data Science Research • Exploratory Data Analysis/Multivariate Data Visualization • Unsupervised Learning: Cluster Analysis • Unsupervised Learning: Data-dimensionality reduction • Supervised Learning: Classification learning • Supervised Learning: Regression • Bayesian Inference • Design of Experiments and Optimal Design under Uncertainties • Semi-Supervised Learning and Multifidelity Modeling • Shallow learning vs Deep learning
Music
 MUSI 2090Sound Studies: Anthropology and the Art of Sound Experience
 Please be sure to enroll in the co-requisite simultaneously, The Contemplative Lab RELG 1559-001
Spring 2021  13574 100SEM (3 Units)Open 5 / 20Noel LobleyMoWe 11:00am - 11:50am Web-Based Course
 We combine creative approaches from sound studies, musicology, anthropology, and composition in order to explore and experience music, sound and artistic practice in their human (and non-human) behavioural contexts. What does music composed through animal dreams sound like? How do we imagine and hear the sounds of underwater and atmospheric anthropology? How do sound art, technology and design transform urban space and everyday social and political experience? How can vibrations both heal and destroy? In answering these and other questions, we investigate local and global immersive sound cultures and trace the ways in which their sounds are sampled, remixed, circulated and experienced. Blending critical and contextual work with exciting opportunities for creative practice, we will interact and collaborate with a range of sound artists and designers. Please also note that a co-requisite will be to enroll in a Contemplative Lab, RELG 1559-001, through which we will be exploring creative Deep Listening practices and more in collaboration with the Contemplative Sciences Center, and the Departments of English and Drama. Please be sure to enroll in both courses as one enrollment action by selecting both courses in the shopping cart and then selecting enroll. This will allow simultaneous enrollment. *** Please note there had been a technical issue in SIS which prevented enrollment. As of 12-18-2020 this has been resolved. If you are trying to enroll in both courses and still experience difficulties, please try emptying your shopping cart and then adding both again. Also feel free to email noel.lobley@virginia.edu at any point for assistance *** No prior musical experience is required.
 MUSI 2559New Course in Music
 Play Guitar! II
Spring 2021  20261 001Lecture (2 Units)Permission13 / 30Michael RosenskyMoWe 10:00am - 10:50am Web-Based Course
 Course is 2 credits and is MW 10:00-10:50, NOT until 11:15.
 A topic based course that will include: Major, Minor, and Pentatonic Scale Positions Arpeggios Scale Patterns Seventh Chords Chord Theory/Chords of Higher Tension Harmonic Analysis Improvisation Soloing on the Blues, Blues Scale and Beyond Composing Diatonic Chord Progressions Basic Chromatic Harmony
 MUSI 3030Studies in Nineteenth-Century Music
Spring 2021  13595 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 16 / 25Elizabeth OzmentTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pm Minor Hall 125
 This class will be taught in a Hybrid format, with approximately 50% of classes conducted in-person and approximately 50% of classes conducted online. Students of all backgrounds are welcome in this class.
 How does one define nineteenth-century music? Can you imagine attending the premiere of a Beethoven symphony or Rossini opera? Why were so many people taking piano lessons? How did music intensify feelings of community and difference? What is the purpose of music? In this seminar, we will begin to answer the above questions by overviewing the creative, cultural, social, intellectual, musical history of Europe during the long nineteenth century, the period in-between the French Revolution and the outbreak of the First World War. This era saw the dissolution of previous ways of understanding the world and the development of new ideologies and artistic movements. Nineteenth-century music intersected with the rise of historicism, nationalism, romanticism, liberalism, socialism, feminism, industrialization, and secularization, reflecting and informing European experiences and worldviews. Because nineteenth-century arts were not unified in style, it will be important for us to strengthen our critical listening skills, place compositions in historical context, and relate these sounds to broader cultural trends. Our study of historical documents will highlight some common themes that distinguish this period of European music from eighteenth- and twentieth-century trends. We will also acknowledge that this music frequently articulated contradictory aesthetics, thereby illuminating period struggles over the purpose and value of artistic expression. Students of all backgrounds are welcome in this class.
 MUSI 3380Introduction to Composition
Spring 2021  13600 100Lecture (3 Units)Permission 16 / 20Leah ReidTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pm Web-Based Course
 MUSI 3380 explores compositional techniques in Western concert music of the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will learn to compose in a variety of styles, and will explore innovative approaches to harmony, rhythm, timbre, texture, and compositional form. We will improvise, listen to, analyze, and discuss new music and compositional techniques. The goal of this course is to expose you to multiple compositional techniques and let you experiment! Coursework will primarily focus on creative and composition exercises, as well as readings, listening, analyses, and short writing assignments. Students will apply their knowledge towards a final composition project. Prerequisite: Permission from the instructor. It is recommended that students have taken MUSI 3310, a prior theory class, or be proficient with scales, intervals, and basic harmony prior to taking MUSI 3380.
 MUSI 4523Issues in Ethnomusicology
 African Electronic Music
 All welcome to contact Noel to request instructor permission, no prior musical experience required
Spring 2021  12458 001Lecture (3 Units)Permission 12 / 10Noel LobleyMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 African cities and urban areas have long been places for some of the most futuristic music being created, diverse sounds that reverberate between local identities and international avant garde music scenes. Explosive, hypnotic and ultra-modern electronic sounds meld stunning dance forms with musical theatre and fashion, articulating the urban youth experience in cities as diverse and vibrant as Jo'Burg, Nairobi, Kinshasha, Lagos and Durban. We will engage multiplex genres of futuristic music, including Congotronics, Shangaan Electro, and Gqom apocalyptic bass music, paying close attention to innovations in artistic practice, remix culture and Afrofuturism. We will explore the histories and futures of the sounds linking African beat making, technology, guitars, and the dynamics of twenty-first century amplified African cityscapes. Blending critical and contextual work with exciting opportunities for creative practice, we will imagine and co-design project work with a collective network of African artists from The Black Power Station, a Pan-African arts collective in Makhanda, South Africa. No prior musical experience is required. | *** Please note that although MUSI 3070 is listed as a prerequisite in SIS, anyone is welcome to contact noel.lobley@virginia.edu directly to request instructor permission. Thank you. ***
 MUSI 4525Topics in Ethnomusicology
 Music of Multicultural America
Spring 2021  18587 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 5 / 15Joel RubinTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm Web-Based Course
 “Music of Multicultural America” looks at American traditional and popular musics from a cross-cultural and multi-ethnic perspective. We will examine the traditions most often called “roots music,” including African-American blues and southern old-time string band music, which influenced the development of rock and roll and country and western. We will also study a wide range of other ethnic musical traditions, from Native American pow wows and Cajun to salsa, klezmer and Balkan-Gypsy-punk, which have influenced popular music-making of the past twenty-five years. Along the way we will treat a complex and shifting web of associated ideas, such as authenticity, heritage, nationalism, and multiculturalism, and the musical or music-marketing categories of folk, roots, indie rock, neo-cabaret, and world music. We will ask how “roots” traditions have fed into various definitions of “American-ness” over the years and how that fits into the current social and political climate. This course is designed for music majors, but others may apply with instructor permission. For non-majors, musical literacy is not a requirement. By petition, it can fulfill the Second Writing Requirement.
 MUSI 4582Composition II
 Project-based mixed-level electronic, electroacoustic, or acoustic music composition
Spring 2021  12631 001Lecture (3 Units)Permission9 / 10Leah ReidTuTh 9:30am - 10:45am Web-Based Course
 MUSI 4582 is an upper-level music composition course. Students will receive a combination of individual lessons and group sessions. The course will provide a forum for students to listen, discuss, workshop, develop, and explore inspirations, compositions, and ideas. Over the course of the semester, students are expected to compose a large-scale work or a series of smaller works in the style of their choosing. Students may compose electronic, acoustic, or electroacoustic music. The course may be repeated for credit with approval of the instructor. Prerequisite: Students are expected to have some prior composition experience and should be comfortable with standard music notation or DAWs. While not required, it is recommended that students have taken MUSI 3370, 3380, 3390, participated in UVA’s Composers Collective, or taken another music composition course prior to taking MUSI 4582. Note: Students do NOT need to have taken MUSI 4581 (Comp I) to take MUSI 4582 (Comp II)
 MUSI 4610Sound Synthesis and Control
 Sound Synthesis and Control: Designing New Musical Instruments
Spring 2021  18603 001WKS (3 Units)Permission 10 / 10Luke DahlTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm New Cabell Hall 299A
 New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME) is a field that explores new ways of performing music with technology. NIME is interdisciplinary, incorporating perspectives from music, sculpture, engineering, human-computer interaction (HCI), and design. In this class we will learn the basic skills needed to design and build new musical instruments. We will implement real-time digital sound synthesis algorithms using the PureData visual programming language, which will run on the Bela embedded audio system. And we will use electronics sensors to measure user’s gestures as input data. The class is primarily project based, and we will prototype a number of new musical instruments and interactions. Students are expected to have experience using computers for music-making, such as MUSI 3390 or MUSI 2350, and experience with PureData or Max is highly desirable.
 MUSI 7509Cultural and Historical Studies of Music
 Sounds of Anachronism/Temporal Syncopation
Spring 2021  18604 001Lecture (3 Units)Open6 / 10Bonnie GordonWe 9:30am - 12:00pm Web-Based Course
 This interdisciplinary graduate seminar plays with the vibrations between pre-modern sounds and current theoretical and political issues. We will approach history and stories not as a way to restore the past but as a way to create a hybrid present. What does Virgil’s portrayal of the goddess Rumor personified in a seventeenth-century opera have to do with a tweetstorm? What is the historical relationship between fiction and dis-information? How do scholars and artists create and transform originary myths? How do emotional and sensory responses affect the doing of history? How do we sound the past in our lives and work? The seminar will begin with two case studies. We will examine the Italian castrato as a premodern cyborg voice from the Global South and as a figure that asks questions about the limits of the human. We will also look at ancient and medieval roots of the settler colonialism of Jamestown as a way to hear the acoustemology of race and the governing of sound in early America and as a precursor to the entanglement of music and race that plays out today. The class will provide a space to do history through creative work or digital humanities. Theoretical readings include Kara Keeling’s Queer Times, Black Futures; Jacques Derrida’s Archive Fever; Amitov Ghosh’s, In an Antique Land, and Elizabeth Freeman’s Time Binds: Queer Temporalities, Queer Histories. Students will also work with digital archives and contemporary creative projections that engage archives and the past. Students need not be in the music department or read music for this class. There will be ample time for students to pursue their own interests. Projects will be tailored to fit the precarity of the Zoom semester and of the humanities and arts in general.
 MUSI 7510Cultural and Historical Studies of Music
 Music, Mimesis, Modernity (click on course number for description)
Spring 2021  14253 001Lecture (3 Units)Open2 / 10 (5 / 10)Michael PuriTu 9:30am - 12:00pm Web-Based Course
 “If human beings suddenly ceased imitating, all forms of culture would vanish.” Drawing inspiration from this striking claim by René Girard, this seminar will ask and seek to answer several questions. In the history of mimesis, what has been imitated, by whom, with what means, and to what end? How and why have western attitudes toward mimesis changed, particularly over the past two centuries? And how does mimesis figure into western musical theory and practice? The ability to decipher western musical notation will help you to read certain assigned texts, but is neither expected nor required. Please note that this Spring 2021 seminar will meet in the morning via Zoom in order to accommodate students taking the course online from abroad.
 MUSI 7520Current Studies in Research and Criticism
 Inventing Folk Music
Spring 2021  18605 001Lecture (3 Units)Open3 / 10Richard WillTh 9:30am - 12:00pm Web-Based Course
 Western musicians, poets, and collectors have been inventing “folk music” since the 18th century, presenting songs (mainly) as expressive of community and place. Serving both progressive and conservative political agendas, they have played a significant role in constructing the social and national boundaries of modernity. This seminar examines the origins of folk music as a concept, its development through 19th- and 20th-century revival movements, and its role in promoting or resisting hierarchies of race, gender, class, and national identity. While focusing on the U.S. and U.K., we will consider the repercussions of folk music ideologies globally, and students are welcome to explore any affected community or place. Musical experience is not required.
Persian
 PERS 3559New Course in Persian
 Modern Persian Literature II
 Modern Persian Literature II
Spring 2021  19209 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 3 / 18 (4 / 18)Pardis MinuchehrTu 4:00pm - 6:30pm Web-Based Course
 In this course, we study various genres of modern Persian literature. We will read short stories, poetry and excerpts from various works of fiction and non-fiction. This course aims to increase proficiency in advanced levels of Persian language skills and provide students with an overview of modern Persian literature. The Prerequisite for this course is proficiency in advanced Persian language.
 PERS 5559New Course in Persian
 Modern Persian Literature
 Modern Persian Literature II
Spring 2021  20474 001Lecture (3 Units)Open1 / 18 (4 / 18)Pardis MinuchehrTu 4:00pm - 6:30pm Web-Based Course
 Graduate Level Course taught in Persian.
Persian in Translation
 PETR 3559New Course in Persian Translation
 Rumi's Reception: Persian Mystical Poetry
 Rumi's Reception: Persian Mystical Poetry (Taught in English)
Spring 2021  19210 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 16 / 25 (18 / 25)Pardis MinuchehrMo 4:00pm - 6:30pm Web-Based Course
 Rumi is today one of America’s best-selling poets. In fact, the Persian poet’s mystical teachings have been translated far and wide for over eight centuries in a vast geographical area. In this course, we study the teachings of Rumi’s spiritual path to happiness and the intricacies of his philosophical discourse to find out the secrets of his international appeal. We will also examine Rumi’s existing ritualistic traditions, the contemporary reception of Sufism, and the varied manifestations of Sufi ideas around the world.
Politics-American Politics
 PLAP 4500Special Topics in American Politics
 Trade and American Politics
Spring 2021  19959 004SEM (3 Units)Open 14 / 15Alexander WelchTu 6:00pm - 8:30pm Web-Based Course
 This course examines the history and place of trade in American Political Thought. Beginning with the colonial and Founding eras, we examine the importance of tariff policies in American politics, with a focus on the ideological and partisan arguments about tariffs. This course culminates by examining the role of tariffs in the election and presidency of Donald Trump. This is an online seminar that will require an empirical research paper.
 Pop Culture and American Politics
Spring 2021  19960 005SEM (3 Units)Open 11 / 15Alexander WelchTh 6:00pm - 8:30pm Web-Based Course
 This course explores the relationship between popular culture and politics. The first half of the course examines the rise of a celebrity-infused political culture and analyzes the changing influence of Hollywood on political campaigns. The remainder of the course studies how politics is represented in TV, film, theater, and music. This is an online seminar requiring a term paper.Although not required, it is helpful if students have taken one of the following courses: MDST 2000 (Intro to Media Studies), PLAP 3140 (Mass Media and American Politics), PLAP 3270 (Public Opinion), or PLAP 4500 (Social Media and American Politics).
Psychology
 PSYC 1010Introductory Psychology
Spring 2021  10677 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 318 / 340Christopher MazurekTBA TBA
 This course's exams will take place on Tuesdays or Thursdays Spring of 2021. Exams will be available from 9am until 11:59pm those days, though you will only have the standard 75 minutes once you begin. Quizzes on the readings will be due Mondays & Wednesdays, though you will have a week to complete these. The use of the REVEL package is mandatory for this course.
 This course's exams will take place on Tuesdays or Thursdays Spring of 2021. Exams will be available from 9am until 11:59pm those days, though you will only have the standard 75 minutes once you begin. Quizzes on the readings will be due Mondays & Wednesdays, though you will have a week to complete these. The use of the REVEL package is mandatory for this course.
 PSYC 3500Special Topics in Psychology
 Hidden Figures: Brain Science Through Diversity
Spring 2021  19044 001SEM (3 Units)Open 27 / 34Adema RibicMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm Chemistry Bldg 402
 Hidden Figures will take the students on a journey through neuroscience and teach the fundamentals of modern systems and behavioral neuroscience through the lens of diversity. The class will emphasize contributions to neuroscience made by women and other groups underrepresented in science, as well as raise awareness and combat bias by active involvement in creation of Wikipedia entries for the said scientists. The objective of the class is twofold: to teach the fundamentals of neuroscience and to give students basic tools to combat biases that plague science.
 PSYC 4250Brain Systems Involved in Memory
Spring 2021  13848 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 12 / 20Cedric WilliamsTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm Web-Based Course
 The seminar explores the essential role of memory in everyday life and reveal how overt patterns of successful behavior are coordinated and executed by the vast amount of information stored in one, or a combination of the six known memory systems. The seminar provides a comprehensive understanding of the chemical, biological and neural processes underlying learning, the mechanisms involved in encoding learned material into memory and the events that permit successful recall of life’s experiences. An in-depth understanding of these processes is accomplished by surveying current and seminal research findings that have: a) isolated precise roles brain structures play during the formation of new memories and b) identified the molecular cascade of events that result in long lasting plastic changes within the brain that correspond to memory formation. We will use a “systems-level” approach to understand how the brain controls a wide range of behavioral, cognitive and psychological phenomena.
 PSYC 4500Special Topics in Psychology
 Psychology of Emotion
Spring 2021  19055 007SEM (3 Units)Open 19 / 20Adrienne WoodMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 Emotions fuel and direct goal-relevant behavior. They prioritize what we pay attention to, how we learn, and what we remember. They regulate our relationships, binding us to some people and repelling us from others. Mental disorders result when emotions become disregulated. In short, emotions are integral to every aspect of our psychology. This course will examine contemporary issues in affective science, or the study of emotion. We will read a combination empirical articles, review and theory papers, and book chapters that address affective processes in both humans and non-human animals. We will begin by establishing a working definition of emotions. We will then familiarize ourselves with the dominant and emerging theories in affective science, all of which attempt to answer the question, "what is emotion?" Next we will then explore the core features of emotion: subjective experience, expression, interaction with other cognitive processes, manifestation in the body and brain, and social regulation. We will then dive deeper, spending time with specific affective states: fear, playfulness, happiness, anger, sadness, and love. We will end by asking how our environment--in particular, our culture--shapes our experience of emotion. We will not deal directly with psychopathology, but students with a clinical interest are encouraged to consider how the examined emotions and processes might become disregulated and maladaptive.
Religion-General Religion
 RELG 2210Religion, Ethics, & Global Environment
Syllabus  12778 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 309 / 360Willis JenkinsTBA TBA
 enrollment cap will be raised from 240 to 360 -- asynchronous --
 For Spring 2021, this course is taught asynchronously, so there are not fixed meeting times for lecture or discussion section. Yet it is also taught interactively, so that you will have several ways of engaging with the instructor and with your TA within a predictable schedule. In effect, it is a quasi-synchronous structure modeled on a regular Tuesday/Thursday lecture course with discussion section - but with more flexibility in when you complete it. Here's how we will accomplish that: 1. Recorded lectures will be delivered on Tuesday and Thursday mornings. You may watch them and complete the embedded questions anytime before midnight on Tuesdays and Thursdays. In order to open the lectures, you must have alread completed the assigned reading for that day and posted a brief comment on it. (I will send more information on the digital platform we will use for this.) 2. During the day on Tuesdays and Thursdays, I will be monitoring your questions, comments, or requests for clarification and will record a 10-minute response. You'll have 24 hours from the time I post it to watch and respond to the additional question within it. 3. You will be assigned a 10-person section with a TA, but there are no in-person weekly meetings. Your TA will organize online discussions and be available to meet with you individually - especially for consultation on writing essays. This not actually a change, as I've always organized the sections this way in order to prioritize a focus on writing in the formats of debate common to public environmental problems: internet discussion forums, blog posts, and formal essays. 4. Open office hours: there will be regular optional opportunities to meet, on zoom and perhaps in person. More details forthcoming.
 RELG 2559New Course in Religious Studies
 Journeys Toward Purpose and Belonging
Spring 2021  20297 002Lecture (3 Units)Open 13 / 20Anthony DeMauroTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm Web-Based Course
 This course explores topics of purpose, belonging, and resilience in relationship to well-being. It helps students navigate their journeys toward a life that is meaningful and makes a positive impact on the world. The course also brings to light dominant cultural forces that shape the way students engage with life choices and relationships and challenges them to critically examine such narratives while envisioning alternatives for the future.
 RELG 3559New Course in Religious Studies
 Beauty and Ritual in Indigenous Religious Cultures
Spring 2021  19281 002SEM (3 Units)Open 8 / 20Kara Ellis SkoraMo 3:30pm - 6:00pm Web-Based Course
 Explore how the Asante (Ghana), the Diné (“Navajo” U.S.), and the Māori (New Zealand) create, re-envision, and retrieve Meaning through the arts used in rituals. Each of these indigenous groups uses dance, music, chanting, drumming, pageantry, visual design, material culture, drama, and oratory to create sacred space, heal both psychological and physical illness, re-enact foundational moments, induce expanded states of consciousness, and otherwise enable, manifest, instill, and engage their Cosmos. Each culture has its own aesthetic that reflects values and experience. How do the arts activate the senses, connect to landscape, and expand imagination? What does creativity have to do with transformation? We will examine each culture separately, but also consider similarities and differences between the three that might reveal deeper insights into how varied religious “action” connects us to our shared human condition.
 RELG 4559New Course in Religious Studies
 The Religious Left in America: Politic and Faith
 The Religious Left in America: Progressive Politics and Progressive Faith
Spring 2021  20235 001SEM (3 Units)Open 6 / 18 (10 / 18)Isaac MayTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pm Web-Based Course
 Considerable attention has been paid to the impact of the religious right on American politics, but its opposite, the American religious left, has been just as impactful. This course examines the history and theology of the religious left in the United States from the nineteenth century until the present. It charts how liberal religion shaped both electoral politics and activism around issues that include abolition, women’s suffrage, the peace movement, civil rights, the labor movement, and immigration. It also explores the impact of theology and religious modernism on the American left.
Russian
 RUSS 3040Applied Russian Phonetics
Spring 2021  19436 001Lecture (3 Units)Permission 7 / 30Mark ElsonMoWe 8:30am - 9:45am Web-Based Course
 This course, taught in English, provides an informal but comprehensive and reasonably detailed introduction to the segmental phonetics of Contemporary Standard Russian with attention to both variants of the standard: Moscow and Petersburg. We will begin with general principles of articulatory phonetics, including symbolization, and then turn to Russian, where there will be attention not only to phones, but also to their functional load and their privilege of occurrence within the word, expanded to include the phonological word. No prerequisites, but one year of Russian is helpful. This course counts as an elective in Linguistics. Instructor permission required.
Spanish
 SPAN 4530Special Topics Seminar: Language
 Spanish vis-à-vis Other Romance Languages
Spring 2021  12251 001Lecture (3 Units)Permission21 / 22Omar Velazquez MendozaTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 Drawing on a comparative approach to language change, this course traces the primitive origins and historical development of the major linguistic changes that took place in the passage from Latin to Spanish and other Romance (i.e., Latin-derived) languages, mainly Portuguese, Italian, and French. Topics to be explored include: Expected and unexpected phonological changes in the neo-Latin language continuum; the role of analogy and ‘contamination’ in language change; etymological and non-etymological nasalization; the object + verb to verb + object shift; the prepositional direct object; expressions of possession; pronominal replacement and duplication of direct and indirect objects. Prerequisite: SPAN 3010 or equivalent AND SPAN 3000 or SPAN 3200 or any other linguistics course focusing on Spanish or on any other language. Conducted in Spanish.
 Spanish to English Translation II
Spring 2021  19953 002Lecture (3 Units)Permission16 / 20Melissa FrostWeFr 11:00am - 11:50am Web-Based Course
 Melissa FrostMo 11:00am - 11:50amWilson Hall 301
 Translation II is a continuation of Span 4040. Span 4040 is a prerequisite for this course.
 SPAN 7220History of the Language
Spring 2021  19415 001SEM (3 Units)Open11 / 12Joel RiniMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pm Web-Based Course
 This course is intended to provide the student with an introduction to the history of the Spanish language and to familiarize the student with the structure of Old Spanish in order to facilitate the reading of Old Spanish texts. The point of departure for class lectures and discussions will be selected texts. Fulfills historical linguistics requirement for the M.A. program.
Systems & Information Engineering
 SYS 6582Selected Topics in Systems Engineering
 CPS: Formal Methods, Safety, and Security
Spring 2021  16237 002Lecture (3 Units)Closed10 / 10 (10 / 10)Lu FengMoWe 5:00pm - 6:15pm Web-Based Course
 Cyber-physical systems (CPS) are smart systems that include co-engineered interacting networks of physical and computational components. Examples of CPS include medical devices, automotive cars, robots, internet of things, smart cities. Increasingly, such systems are everywhere. It becomes more and more important to assure the safety and security of CPS, since many CPS applications are safety-critical and life-critical. This course will give you the required skills to analyze the CPS that are all around us, so that when you contribute to the design of CPS, you are able to understand important safety and security aspects and feel confident designing and analyzing CPS systems. The overall goal of this course is to enable you to learn not only the fundamental knowledge of CPS and formal methods, but also important skills of creative thinking, collaborative working, and continuing learning of new techniques after the course is over. It will provide an excellent foundation for students who seek industry positions and for students interested in pursuing research.
University Seminar
 USEM 1570University Seminar
 Making Digital & Physical Art, Animations & Music
 An Introduction to Design and Making in the Arts
Website  19616 009SEM (2 Units)Closed 12 / 12Glen Bull+1TuTh 12:00pm - 12:50pm Web-Based Course
 Participants receive Creativity Kits for creating art and music - such as vinyl stickers, digital and physical animations, light shows synchronized to music, and 3D models.
 Participants will receive a Creativity Kit for creating art and music - including vinyl stickers, digital and physical animations, light shows synchronized to music, and 3D models.
Women and Gender Studies
 WGS 3814Gender, Sexuality, Identity in Premodern France
Spring 2021  20660 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 3 / 30 (12 / 30)Deborah McGradyMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pm Web-Based Course
 If you imagine the Middle Ages as a far-off land occupied by only “knights in shining armor and damsels in distress,” think again. This course will open your eyes to a far more complex conversation about sexuality and gender that resonates in surprising ways with contemporary views. We will read in tandem medieval religious writings, medical works, and conduct manuals that set the stage for distinguishing between men and women based on their biological and behavioral “predispositions” alongside works of fiction that challenged these official stances. Among our readings will be letters exchanged between one-time lovers, a church leader and abbess, that recount in real time their efforts to think through the different expectations placed on them as church figures. Poetry, romance, and travel narratives that treat the Christian West’s encounter with other religions, races, and ethnicities will further reveal the fault lines that destabilize rigid binary treatment of the sexes. The thirteenth-century romance of a young girl raised to adulthood as a boy will provide ample treatment of how our medieval counterparts struggled with the notion that “biology is destiny.” Finally, the work of the first feminist and professional writer of Europe, Christine de Pizan, who composed the first manifesto written by women in their defense, will help us fully appreciate the challenges faced then and now when breaking down gendered expectations. Through our reading of these fascinating works, it is hoped that students will acquire a thicker and more nuanced appreciation of the long history of gender, sexuality, and identity. No pre-requisites - class discussions will introduce students both to medieval culture and to the basic tenets of gender theory. Graded work will include short critical engagement and creative responses to readings, class discussions and presentations, and written exams. The second-writing requirement can be fulfilled with this course (requires instructor permission). Lectures and readings are in English.