UVa Class Schedules (Unofficial, Lou's List v2.10)   New Features
Schedule of Classes with Additional Descriptions - Spring 2022
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African-American and African Studies
 AAS 2500Topics Course in Africana Studies
 Introduction to Race, Class & the Environment
20098 002SEM (3 Units)Closed 60 / 60Kimberly FieldsWe 6:00pm - 8:30pmMaury Hall 104
 This course explores the relationships between 'race', socio-economic status, interest group politics and environmental policy. We will address and contend with debates surrounding the claims that racialized, marginalized and poor communities disproportionately shoulder society's negative environmental burdens. Particular regard will be paid to the political and decision-making processes through which environmental issues are channeled, evaluated and addressed. Through a variety of analytical and contextual lenses, we will examine fundamental environmental problems faced by individuals and communities of color and the policies and initiatives designed to address them. Attention will also be given to the political and economic responses of community, business, and political stakeholders towards perceived environmental inequities. Additionally, stakeholder responses to existing environmental justice policies and initiatives will also be considered. Furthermore, we will discuss arguments concerning political elites' and interest groups' perceived failures to provide a politically viable vision and remedial strategy to address environmental injustice. Through selected case studies, we will examine a number of topics and questions. Some key topics to be considered include: theories of racism and justice, the conceptual history and definitions of environmental racism, the historical development and goals of the environmental justice movement, the social, political, economic and environmental advantages and drawbacks of current systems of production and consumption, stakeholder responses to environmental inequities, the impact of environmental justice policies on environmental inequities as well as their impact on subsequent political behavior, pollution in developing nations and, indigenous peoples. Additionally, the possible causes for patterns of injustice will be examined. Recent proposals to address the problem of environmental racism and injustice will be discussed and analyzed.
 Swahili Cultures & Stories
20715 004SEM (3 Units)Open 13 / 16Anne RotichMoWeFr 10:00am - 10:50amNew Cabell Hall 485
 Who are the Swahili people? Why is their identity complex? Are they Arabs or Africans? In this course we shall uncover the forgotten story of the Swahili people. You will learn about the rich culture and diversity of issues concerning the Swahili people and the Swahili coast including music, food, clothing, trade, and the social and political issues. This course will also provide you with a captivating tour of the Swahili region through examination of stories, texts, videos, and real-life engaging experiences.
 AAS 3500Intermediate Seminar in African-American & African Studies
 Cultures of African Cinema
 Cultures of African Cinema
20095 003SEM (3 Units)Open 20 / 25Brian SmithsonTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmWilson Hall 214
 What roles does cinema play in the lives of people in Africa and its diasporas? What does film mean to African audiences, and to the producers, funders, and superstar actors who make the movies they watch? How do we define “African cinema,” and what are the political, racial, and cultural ramifications of our definitions? We will consider these questions by watching African movies from different production cultures, including art cinema, the melodramas of Nigeria’s Nollywood, and the big-budget blockbusters of “New Nollywood.” We will place these movies into their cultural context. In the process, we will touch on a broad range of topics, including African filmmakers’ struggles for artistic independence, African movies’ capacity to speak back to power, and the digital era’s Netflix-ization of African film.
 Race & Medicine in Post-19th Century America
 Race and Medicine in America from 1960-present
20096 004SEM (3 Units)Wait List (8 / 199) 18 / 18Liana RichardsonTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amNew Cabell Hall 283
 In this course, we will examine the medical practices involved in the social construction of racial difference and the persistence of racial health inequities in the U.S. during the 20th and 21st centuries. Drawing from relevant scholarship in sociology, anthropology, and history, we will discuss the origins and consequences of medical racism, as well as the continued role of medicine in racial meaning-making. We will also consider why the medicalization of social issues—from collective violence to drug addiction—is often a racialized process, focusing especially on how contrasting schemas of medicalization and criminalization result in the differential labeling and treatment of racial groups as either victims or villains. Case studies and historical accounts about the racialization, medicalization, and/or criminalization of various health and social issues, including obesity, heart disease, drug addiction, and other “problem” behaviors, will be used as illustrative examples. Attention will also be given to the consequences of these phenomena for health equity, social justice, and human/civil rights.
 AAS 7000Introduction to Africana Studies
 The Global Color Line
20104 001SEM (3 Units)Open5 / 20Robert VinsonWe 2:00pm - 4:30pmNew Cabell Hall 407
 African Diaspora Studies has grown exponentially over the past thirty years, expanding geographical & chronological conceptions of the black world beyond nation-state boundaries, and anticipating the interdisciplinary "transnational turn"over the past two decades. Emphasizing the centrality of black peoples in the making of the modern world, this graduate seminar surveys many of the landmark events, classic texts and major historiographical debates that comprise African Diaspora studies.
American Studies
 AMST 2321Latinx Fiction and Film
18695 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (12 / 199) 35 / 35Carmen LamasTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmWilson Hall 238
 If you are waitlisted, please come to the first day of class, Thursday, January 20.
 In this course we will explore the diverse and also converging experiences of different Latinx groups in the US. We will read contemporary novels and poetry by Latinx authors from different Latinx groups (Chicanx, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, Central American and South America). We will discuss the migration history of different groups and explore concepts of the “border.” We will ask ourselves how the experience of immigration impacts individual and group identity in the US and in countries of origin.
 AMST 2422Point of View Journalism
Syllabus  18696 001SEM (3 Units)Closed 38 / 0 (38 / 0)Lisa GoffTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmNew Cabell Hall 309
 No waitlist--email me if you want to join class: lg6t@virginia.edu. Some spaces may open up.
 This course examines the history and practice of “point-of-view” journalism, a controversial but credible alternative to the dominant model of “objectivity” on the part of the news media. Not to be confused with “fake news,” point-of-view journalism has a history as long as the nation’s, from Tom Paine and Benjamin Franklin in the eighteenth century to "muckrakers" like Ida B. Wells Barnett and Ida Tarbell at the end of the nineteenth, and “New Journalism” practitioners like Tom Wolfe, Hunter Thompson, and Barbara Ehrenreich in the twentieth. Twenty-first century point-of-view practitioners include news organizations on the right (Fox News, One America News Network) and left (Vice, Jacobin, MSNBC, Democracy Now), as well as prominent voices like Ta-Nehisi Coates, Rebecca Solnit, Jia Tolentino, and Sarah Smarsh. We will also consider the rise of “fake news.” A term formerly used to indicate the work of entertainers such as Jon Stewart and Steven Colbert, who pilloried the news (and newsmakers) in order to interpret them, “fake news” is now an established practice of the far right, as well as a political slur used to denigrate the work of mainstream (center and left-of-center) news organizations.
 AMST 3222Hands-On Public History: Slavery and Reconstruction, Part II
 Reconstruction, the Black Church, and the Black Press
Website  20115 001SEM (3 Units)Permission 7 / 18Lisa GoffTu 3:30pm - 6:00pmBryan Hall 235
 Request permission to join class on SIS (it's easy!), or email me (Prof. Lisa Goff): lg6t@virginia.edu. Fulfills all 3 AMST area requirements: Historical, Race/Ethnicity, and Transnational/Regional.
 This course investigates how the history of slavery and Reconstruction in central Virginia is presented to the public at historic sites, museums, archives, and on digital platforms. Students will produce digital “story maps” that fill in some of the gaps in the public history of Reconstruction in central Virginia—contributing, in some small way, to a more just and comprehensive public history. In addition to the brutal realities of that historical period we will also focus on three areas of Black achievement and empowerment during that era: politics, religion, and media. We will work with a community partner, One Shared Story (https://onesharedstory.org), contributing specifically to two of their initiatives: geo-referencing and documenting African American cemeteries at Black churches in central Virginia; and assisting community members conducting genealogical research. You will be trained in these skills; no prior experience necessary! You can see the work students have done in previous classes here: https://hoph-2020-f-oss.hub.arcgis.com/
Anthropology
 ANTH 2541Topics in Linguistics
 Language Death and Revitalization
19364 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (7 / 199) 30 / 30Nathan WendteTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amNew Cabell Hall 383
 The United Nations declared 2019 the Year of Indigenous Languages in order to raise awareness of the rapid rate at which the world's linguistic diversity is being depleted. This course examines the causes, effects, and ideologies surrounding language endangerment, documentation, and reclamation. It explores the creative processes by which individuals and communities are resisting the forces of linguistic homogenization and erasure as well as the broader discourses surrounding such phenomena.
 ANTH 2559New Course in Anthropology
 Comparing World Racisms
 Comparing World Racisms
19720 100Lecture (3 Units)Open, WL (2 / 199) 72 / 120Ira BashkowMoWe 3:30pm - 4:20pmWilson Hall 301
 What can we learn about racism by comparing its forms in different parts of the world? In this course we will compare anti-Black, anti-Indigenous, and other racisms in a selection of the following: Germany (during World War Two and at present), South Africa, Rwanda, Israel/Palestine, Japan, Brazil, China, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Canada, and the U.S.
 ANTH 3559New Course in Anthropology
 Anthropological Linguistics
19365 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (5 / 199) 20 / 20Nathan WendteTh 5:00pm - 7:30pmBrooks Hall 103
 The study of human language has often been conducted in isolation from other sciences, especially social ones. This course introduces students to an anthropological approach to linguistics that takes into account the various ways in which sociocultural factors can influence the production, use, and conceptualization of language. We will trace the development of this trend in scholarship from its beginnings to the present day. Students will gain an understanding of both theories and methodologies within anthropological linguistics.
History of Art and Architecture
 ARAH 9545Seminar in 20th/21st Century Art
 Issues in Global Curatorial Theory and Practice
 Curating the World/The World of Curating: Issues in Global Curatorial Theory and Practice
18433 001SEM (3 Units)Open 7 / 12Henry SkerrittWe 4:30pm - 7:00pmFayerweather Hall 208
 Today, it seems, everyone is a curator. In popular discourse, from fine dining to social network influencers, “curatorship” has emerged as a buzzword to replace older notions of connoisseurship, judgement and taste. But what is at stake in the ubiquity of this label? As museum professionals seek to bring curatorship into the academic realm, is it possible to frame curatorship as a discipline with its own modes and methods of critical inquiry? As curatorial discourse expands to every corner of the globe, could this methodology be liberating for voices previously marginalized by the academy, or does it merely represent another sign of the victory of late-capitalism? Using the touring exhibition Madayin: Eight Decades of Aboriginal Australian Bark Painting (currently being developed by the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection) as a test case, students will have the opportunity to explore these issues in context of both theory and practice.
Architecture
 ARCH 5424Direct Cinema Media Fabrics
Website  20238 001WKS (3 Units)Permission9 / 15Earl MarkTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amCampbell Hall 105
 DIRECT CINEMA MEDIA FABRICS is a workshop and seminar. The cinema has expanded to encompass a greater range of media and methods, transcending architecture, sculpture, theater, animation, scientific discovery and environmental art. We will explore methods of capturing moving images, sound and potentially other sensory input through microcontrolled sensors and computervision, discerning key patterns and shapes, and transforming them into creative virtual or physical forms. It is anticipated that an interdisciplinary group of students will enroll in the class, such as from design, studio art, media studies, digital music, and computer science, and that the kinds of final projects will vary accordingly. Architecture students may count the class as a VisualizationElective. The class also counts as an Integrative Elective in Computer Science. It also satisfies the Approved Practice of Media course list in Media Studies. The course engages three phases of a data collection to a creative process. The phases are: 1. moviemaking and videography, 2. computervision and sensing, and 3. media fabrication. For example, a video recording, sound recording or a motion capture body suit may be used to collect initial data. The data is processed to discern patterns, forms or movements. In turn, the movements and other observations are creatively translated into some other media such as a movie, a video installation, or a moving fabric wall. Methods used in each phase are: Phase 1: Direct Cinema: Workshops explore a documentary moviemaking style conducive to spontaneous discovery and observation. Subjects may include people and their environments, phenomenal studies of light, air, and water changing over time, or other elements of story and place. Phase 2: Image Processing & Computervision: Tools are used to accentuate, abstract, analyze and expand upon captured video and data obtained from other sensors and to set the stage for creative interpretation. Phase 3: Media Fabrics: The processed input data is now creatively translated into either physical or virtual media. This may include a physical building element that moves (e.g., a building skin), a virtual form (e.g., a choreographed animated human figure), of some other type of virtual or real three-dimensional composition. Each phase coincides with an exercise that explores technology to be used in a final cumulative project. The final project and type outcome is developed on an individual basis. A significant part of the class will be devoted to learning to program in the processing language initially developed at the MIT Media lab (see processing.org) and learning to build microcontrollers configured with sensors. We filter captured data, and developed its analysis and interpretation. We explore how we harness this process to create new fabrications based upon our own speculative imagination. 
 ARCH 5500Special Topics in Architecture
 Rapid Shelter Displaced People
Website  14460 002Lecture (3 Units)Permission13 / 12 (14 / 14)Earl MarkTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmCampbell Hall 220C
 pid Shelter Displaced People is a small interdiscipinary independent projects seminar that seeks to revisit assumptions for rapidly deployed emergency shelter for forcibly displaced people. The United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) estimates displacement has surpassed 80 million at mid-2020.* These figures are the highest in recorded history. The seminar is open to graduate and undergraduate students from any discipline by request on SIS. Displaced from their familar surroundings, traumatized, separated from family, needing food, protection from the weather, sanitation, and safety, it seems self-evident that rapidly deployed shelter within a secure perimeter is an essential first step to ensuring the survival of people facing physical displacement and upheaval. Yet, temporary settlements of refugees that spring up under urgent conditions may expand and last well beyond expectations. The initial footprint may soon become obsolete with respect to ensuring the health, adjustment, self determination, religious and cultural practices, and sense of hope needed. The current state of the art has a mixed record of success. Religious, cultural, political and social conflicts are difficult to resolve. Limited and uncertain resources are nearly a given. Climate change is increasingly viewed as a challenge. Infectious disease presents its own unique spatial requirements. Predetermined shelters are not always helpful if not developed in close partnership and with agency given to the displaced community. These conditions could potentially benefit from innovations based upon reframing the requirements and looking more completely after the hopes and the experiences that forcibly displaced people have. Greater attention to social, religious, educational, cultural and commerce needs have worked to provide a more effective solution for forcibly displaced people settlements even in unstable circumstances. Smart city concepts and real time probabilistic site impact assessment applied early on may also be helpful. The seminar brings together diverse points of view from accross different fields to examine case studies from a shared spatial and environmental perspective .
 ARCH 8500Special Topics in Architecture
 Rapid Shelter Displaced People
Website  18731 002Lecture (3 Units)Closed1 / 2 (14 / 14)Earl MarkTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmCampbell Hall 220C
 Rapid Shelter Displaced People is a small interdiscipinary independent projects seminar that seeks to revisit assumptions for rapidly deployed emergency shelter for forcibly displaced people. The United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) estimates displacement has surpassed 80 million at mid-2020.* These figures are the highest in recorded history. The seminar is open to graduate and undergraduate students from any discipline by request on SIS. Displaced from their familar surroundings, traumatized, separated from family, needing food, protection from the weather, sanitation, and safety, it seems self-evident that rapidly deployed shelter within a secure perimeter is an essential first step to ensuring the survival of people facing physical displacement and upheaval. Yet, temporary settlements of refugees that spring up under urgent conditions may expand and last well beyond expectations. The initial footprint may soon become obsolete with respect to ensuring the health, adjustment, self determination, religious and cultural practices, and sense of hope needed. The current state of the art has a mixed record of success. Religious, cultural, political and social conflicts are difficult to resolve. Limited and uncertain resources are nearly a given. Climate change is increasingly viewed as a challenge. Infectious disease presents its own unique spatial requirements. Predetermined shelters are not always helpful if not developed in close partnership and with agency given to the displaced community. These conditions could potentially benefit from innovations based upon reframing the requirements and looking more completely after the hopes and the experiences that forcibly displaced people have. Greater attention to social, religious, educational, cultural and commerce needs have worked to provide a more effective solution for forcibly displaced people settlements even in unstable circumstances. Smart city concepts and real time probabilistic site impact assessment applied early on may also be helpful. The seminar brings together diverse points of view from accross different fields to examine case studies from a shared spatial and environmental perspective .
Architectural History
 ARH 4591Undergraduate Seminar in the History of Architecture
 Museum Collecting Strategies
14470 001SEM (3 Units)Permission 8 / 6 (14 / 12)Lisa Reilly+1Tu 1:00pm - 3:30pmCampbell Hall 108
 This course will interrogate the process of museum acquisition and provide real-life experience in the development of a proposal for object acquisition by The Fralin Museum of Art. Recent events have unexpectedly put museum collecting strategies in the news and placed the process under close scrutiny. It will include a visit to New York to examine objects under consideration through visits to leading auction houses, art dealers, and galleries.
History of Art
 ARTH 1500Introductory Seminars in Art History
 Art and Experience
 Art and Experience: How to Connect Them
13351 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (1 / 199) 15 / 15Elizabeth TurnerMoWe 11:00am - 12:15pmFayerweather Hall 215
 "Art and Experience" asks and answers certain basic questions: What is Art? How is Art connected to Life and to You? Where is Art? Why do museums sometime disconnect us from Art and Experience? How can we reconnect them? The seminar test drives philosopher John Dewey’s complaint about museums as disconnectors of experience. It will be an exploratory class with an emphasis upon the verification and validation of first-hand experiences with objects and settings On Grounds and Beyond. This lots of field trips with behind the scenes discussions with museum professionals! It combines weekly lectures, structured readings and discussion about art history, aesthetics, and art appreciation. In so doing we will examine the histories of certain museums and museum spaces designed specifically for the collecting of modern art in America. Students will be required to keep a weekly journal to include responses to weekly readings, and images and site visits. Your collected observations and visual analysis throughout the semester will, in the end, create "an aesthetic autobiography" of sorts. As a further manifestation of aesthetic identity your final project will be to design and install your own imaginary modern gallery space (using ArtSteps) with works you have selected (collected) throughout the semester and arranged according to your research and aesthetic philosophy which you will present to the class.
 ARTH 1503Art and the Premodern World
 Art and Astronomy
18435 100Lecture (3 Units)Open 20 / 60Eric Ramirez-WeaverMoWe 9:00am - 9:50amCampbell Hall 160
 Looking outward and upward at the starry sky, artists, philosophers, and scientists have throughout history consistently sought to situate themselves within the cosmos and to comprehend its heavenly machinery. Creative efforts at understanding or harnessing the significance of the planets and the stars have resulted in architectural wonders such as Stonehenge, zodiacal floor mosaics in late antique synagogues, star pictures in medieval manuscripts, Islamic celestial globes and astrolabes, illustrations for medical treatment, alchemical interventions, observation or imagination of the heavens, and more modern treatments ranging from Joseph Cornell to Star Wars. This course traces the development of scientific, political, spiritual, magical, and intellectual technologies of power that have tied individuals to their views and uses for astronomy. Topics include: stars and rule, astronomy, astrology, Ptolemy’s universe, Christian reinterpretation, Arabic or Islamic contributions, alchemy, magic, medicine, Galileo, science fiction, Chesley Bonestell, Remedios Varo, Kambui Olujimi, androids, Star Trek, and Star Wars.
 ARTH 1507Art and Global Cultures
 Art and the Silk Road
13352 100Lecture (3 Units)Open 37 / 60Dorothy WongMoWe 1:00pm - 1:50pmCampbell Hall 160
 Stretching some 8,000 kilometers, the Silk Road is a network of trade routes that provided a bridge between the east and the west between the first and fourteenth centuries CE. Despite periods of disruptions, the Silk Road flourished as a commercial and at times military highway. But more than that, it was a channel for the transmission of ideas, technologies, and artistic forms and styles, with far-reaching impact beyond China and the Mediterranean world. This course introduces the art forms, trade objects, and religions that flourished along the historical Silk Road.
 ARTH 1559New Course in Art History
 What Art Can Do For You
18439 100Lecture (3 Units)Open 30 / 60Francesca FioraniMoWe 3:30pm - 4:20pmCampbell Hall 160
 An overview of art from the perspective of both its history and the many ways it operates in the world today. Focusing on case studies from different periods and world regions, topics include art in museums, art markets, cultural appropriation and international law, public art, art and social justice, the science of conservation, and methodologies of art history.
 ARTH 2054Roman Art and Archaeology
18440 100Lecture (4 Units)Open 34 / 60Dylan RogersTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmCampbell Hall 160
 “What have the Romans ever done for us??” That iconic question in Monty Python’s Life of Brian will be a major thread in our course this semester. This semester, we will explore the artistic, architectural, and archaeological monuments of ancient Italy and its expansive Roman Empire from the founding of Rome to the end of the Roman Empire. Our journey will start from the origins under Etruscan influence through the periods of the Roman Republic and Principate, using a variety of media, including monumental and domestic architecture, wall paintings, mosaics, sculpture, and coins, as well as ancient written sources. Our goal is to examine Roman art and archaeology within its extended historical and cultural context, from sites throughout the ancient Mediterranean. The monuments of ancient Roman art and archaeology discussed in class are representative of the culture that produced them and reflect of the major historical, social, and philosophical developments of the era that still impact on our lives today, both in a positive and negative light.
 ARTH 2281The Age of Caravaggio, Velázquez, and Bernini
18444 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (4 / 199) 50 / 50Lawrence GoeddeMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmCampbell Hall 160
 A survey of the art of the Baroque in Italy, Spain, and France from roughly 1580 to 1715, focusing on major artists and the historical, cultural, and religious developments that shaped the art and to which the art gave visual expression.
 ARTH 2559New Course in History of Art
 Queer Histories of American Art, 1950s to 1990s
18445 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (6 / 199) 20 / 20David GetsyTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmFayerweather Hall 206
 In the wake of the Second World War, demographic shifts fostered new concentrations of lesbian, gay, and otherwise non-heterosexual people in U.S. cities starting in the 1950s. Visual art that addressed these increasingly visible communities began to flourish in these decades, and this course will track the shifts in the queer production of art during this time. We will examine the transition from highly coded and covert registrations of queer lives in the 1950s to the forthrightness and activism that emerged after the Stonewall uprising in 1969 to the rage of the 1980s spurred by government inaction on the AIDS crisis. The course will be structured around case studies that examine changing attitudes toward the politics of visibility, the question of assimilation, the need for radical refusal, and the disruption of norms and naturalized roles. Throughout, our examinations will be focused on larger questions for the history and historiography of U.S. art, including the erasure of non-white subjects from queer art historical narratives, the relationship of transgender histories to queer art and politics, and the continuing institutional censorship of queer art.
 ARTH 2961Arts of the Islamic World
12636 001Lecture (3 Units)Open, WL (8 / 199) 49 / 50Amanda PhillipsTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmCampbell Hall 160
 Big questions, big issues, new perspectives on art from Indonesia to Iberia.
 What’s Islamic about Islamic art? What makes a mosque in Indonesia different from one in Iberia? Where are all the pictures? And what about that tired old question of iconoclasm – or the destroying of images? Should art historians only talk about the rock crystal and porcelains and silks made for sultans and emperors, or can we also look at ceramics and cottons and other things made for humbler folk? What’s with all that ornament? Do materials matter, and can fine art be mass-produced? To answer some of these questions, we’ll be exploring big themes, such as the requirements of worship and imperial building campaigns, daily life and its objects, conventions of representation (or picture-making), the absolute triumph of calligraphy as an art form, the way Mediterranean and Oceanic trade connected different cultures, and how looting, plunder, and finally colonialism and nationalism also impact on the way we see and understand art and architecture in the twenty-first century.
 ARTH 3559New Course in History of Art
 Abstraction: Theory and Practice
19984 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed20 / 20 (20 / 20)Christa Robbins+1TuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmRuffin Hall 319
 In this jointly taught course, between studio and art history, students will explore a range of theories of abstraction in discourse and practice from the early twentieth century to today. Course work and responses to class material are open, to be negotiated collectively and individually, in order to arouse curiosity and discussion around the potential for abstraction today. Class time will be divided between lecture, discussion, and studio time. We will meet twice a week for lecture/discussion (75 minutes each) and students have additional time to work through exercises that include writing, making, and researching. Students will conclude the course with their own self-guided project.
 Contagion and Culture
 Infectious: Contagion and Culture
21019 002Lecture (3 Units)Open18 / 30 (18 / 30)Paul DobrydenMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 332
 Why is contagion so fascinating? From plagues, vampires, and zombie movies to mobs, laughter, and memes, contagious phenomena can be found in cultural objects of all kinds--indeed, culture itself is often described as infectious, something that reproduces and spreads from person to person. Drawing on texts, images, and films from the late 19th century to the present, this course will use contagion as a lens for examining and troubling fundamental cultural distinctions, such as self/other, mind/body, society/nature, sacred/profane, original/copy, medium/message, and living/dead. We will ask not just how culture has tried to make sense of contagion, but how contagion has been used to make sense of culture as well. Fulfills the Second Writing Requirement.
 ARTH 3591Art History Colloquium
 Medieval Manuscript Illumination
13441 002Lecture (3 Units)Open 11 / 15Eric Ramirez-WeaverTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmFayerweather Hall 215
 This course examines the development of manuscript illumination following the birth of the codex in ca. 300. Each manuscript studied exemplifies aspects of changing period styles, scientific beliefs, and spiritual identities. The myriad ways that books manifest crafted confessions of medieval ideas and reveal a sensual appreciation for beauty and value will be interrogated through a set of case studies ranging roughly 450-1450. Students in this course will learn the fundamental research skills required to undertake original study of medieval manuscripts.
 Race, Ethnicity, & Antiquity
13442 003Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (1 / 199) 15 / 15Dylan RogersMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmFayerweather Hall 206
 This course explores the critical concepts of race and ethnicity in the ancient Mediterranean by examining the art, archaeology, and literature of the Greek and Roman worlds. In understanding how the Greeks and Romans conceptualized their own racial differences—we will make connections with later periods of history, including our own. By the end of the course, we will be able to identify the difference between the way ancient peoples and modern societies think about race and ethnicity, and to demonstrate how contemporary discussions of these topics have been shaped by our relationship with antiquity.
 American Modernisms
 American Modernisms: Prophecy, Protest and Propaganda
Website  13443 004Lecture (3 Units)Open 13 / 15Elizabeth TurnerTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmFayerweather Hall 215
 American Modernisms: Prophecy, Protest and Propaganda Have you ever wondered whether Art can change you or the world? How did American artists become Liberators? Historians? Propagandists? Psychologists? In our American Modernisms class, you will encounter revolutionary artistic movements such as photo secession, futurism, synchromism, precisionism, New York Dada, social realism, the prairie style, regionalism and the New Negro and Pueblo watercolorists and Abstract Expressionists. Among the highlights of this class is the opportunity to curate an exhibition at the Special Collections Library. By identifying and exploring artists, institutions and publications and how they intersect with economies of exhibitions and audiences, you will be able to recognize and explain how and when artistic images change and create new channels of perception and communication over time. We will call out institutionalized power structures as well as acknowledge individual and collective actions of artists and critics who challenge those structures, including peoples of color with agency as well as anti-racists black and white. In so doing we will focus upon the practice and theories of a range of artists from William Merrett Chase and Robert Henri and Edward Hopper, Alfred Stieglitz and Georgia O’Keeffe, Joseph Stella and Katherine Dreier, Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, Jacob Lawrence and Gwendolyn Knight, Stuart Davis and David Smith, Romare Bearden and Norman Lewis, Thomas Hart Benton and Jackson Pollock working and exhibiting in the United States between 1900 and 1950.
 ARTH 4591Undergraduate Seminar in the History of Art
 Recent Debates in Contemporary Art and Performance
12752 002SEM (3 Units)Open 9 / 12David GetsyTh 9:30am - 12:00pmFayerweather Hall 208
 This reading-intensive, discussion-based seminar will respond to current conversations in the scholarship on contemporary art and performance. Sessions will focus on recently published books, exhibition catalogues, and articles as a means to examine the history and future of art historical writing. A central question will be that of methods for research and writing, and we will compare and contextualize authors’ research practices and modes of argumentation. Readings for the seminar may also include discussions of art, performance, and theory from interdisciplinary perspectives (such as performance studies, queer studies, literature, or American studies), and we will evaluate the priorities of these different disciplinary perspectives. The selection of readings varies from year to year and will include important new scholarship in the arts as well as respond to rapidly changing events and debates in the art world.
 Museum Collecting Strategies
18859 004SEM (3 Units)Permission 6 / 6 (14 / 12)Lisa Reilly+1Tu 1:00pm - 3:30pmCampbell Hall 108
 This course will interrogate the process of museum acquisition and provide real-life experience in the development of a proposal for object acquisition by The Fralin Museum of Art. Recent events have unexpectedly put museum collecting strategies in the news and placed the process under close scrutiny. It will include a visit to New York to examine objects under consideration through visits to leading auction houses, art dealers, and galleries.
Studio Art
 ARTS 3559New Course in Studio Art
 Abstraction: Theory and Practice
19986 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed20 / 20 (20 / 20)Christa Robbins+1TuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmRuffin Hall 319
 In this jointly taught course, between studio and art history, students will explore a range of theories of abstraction in discourse and practice from the early twentieth century to today. Course work and responses to class material are open, to be negotiated collectively and individually, in order to arouse curiosity and discussion around the potential for abstraction today. Class time will be divided between lecture, discussion, and studio time. We will meet twice a week for lecture/discussion (75 minutes each) and students have additional time to work through exercises that include writing, making, and researching. Students will conclude the course with their own self-guided project.
Astronomy
 ASTR 8500Current Astronomical Topics
 Professional Development and Proposal Writing
Website  12057 001Lecture (1 Units)Open5 / 24Robert O'ConnellTu 3:30pm - 4:45pmAstronomy Bldg 265
 A topical seminar on professional development for graduate students in astronomy to prepare them for research careers in academia, government, and industry. Topics discussed include navigating the post-PhD job market, writing proposals and curriculum vitae, giving presentations, and ethics in research.
Biology
 BIOL 3090Our World of Infectious Disease
18639 001Lecture (3 Units)Permission 40 / 40Jennifer GulerMoWeFr 11:00am - 11:50amShannon House 107
 For SPR 2022, this course is instructor permission only and diverse majors and years of study are encouraged. Contact the instructor at jlg5fw@virginia.edu if you are interested in taking the course. SPR 2023 will be a larger enrollment course (~100).
 BIOL 4330Wiring the Brain
18719 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (15 / 199) 40 / 40Barry CondronTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amShannon House 107
 SIS Description: This course will cover the current state of knowledge for how neurons form connections in the brain. The course will initially focus on how relatively simple model systems have provided the critical clues as to how specific synaptic connections form. This will be followed by a discussion of how this knowledge can be applied to the understanding and treatment of human neural disorders. About a quarter of the course will be standard lectures and the remainder student-led discussion of primary literature. Prerequisites: BIOL 3000 and BIOL 3010; BIOL 3050 or Psych 2200.
 BIOL 4559New Course in Biology
 Animal Social Networks
20774 001Lecture (2 Units)Open17 / 20Phoebe CookTh 3:30pm - 5:30pmAstronomy Bldg 265
 Cows have best friends, snakes have enemies, and some beetles are party animals while others are loners. All organisms exist in the context of other members of their species, and the patterns of interaction between them can be described as social networks. In this course, we will cover some of the key findings of the emerging, interdisciplinary field of social network analysis: animals from fruit flies to elephants have stable social bonds, consistently occupy the same position in a network, and experience significant consequences of that position. We can use the same tools to examine human social networks. During this course, we will explore how diseases and information move through networks in both animals and humans, using COVID-19 and misinformation as case studies. You will have the chance to engage with this exciting field the way professional scientists do, by reading published papers and testing hypotheses about real datasets using the programming language R. No experience with reading scientific papers or coding is required; we will build these skills over the course of the semester.
Civil Engineering
 CE 6015Project Management
20041 001Lecture (3 Units)Open13 / 20Cody PennettiTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amRice Hall 011
 Based on methods of the Project Management Institute (PMI) PMP and INCOSE SEBoK, students will learn management practices applicable to industry-based projects and research work. The course will equip students with the principles, tools, and the lexicon of project management that can be applied to any project size and type. The material will compliment engineering competency to promote project success and career advancement.
Commerce
 COMM 4559New Course in Commerce
 Finance and Society
20254 002Lecture (3 Units)Open 8 / 25William WilhelmTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmRobertson Hall 221
 The course is open to both Comm and non-Comm students. The only prerequisite for the course is introductory microeconomics. If you have any problems registering for the course or would like a copy of the current syllabus, email at bill.wilhelm@virginia.edu.
 Course Description: Financial markets play a central role in market economies, but they are complex, opaque, and prone to human error and misbehavior. This course addresses these social challenges by developing tools for economic, legal, and moral reasoning. The course is intended for a broad audience. Students who are not considering a career in finance will learn how to engage more effectively with public debate around financial markets. Students considering a career in finance will learn how to identify and more thoughtfully respond to conflicts and temptations endemic in financial markets.
 Doing Business in China
 Navigating the Cross-cultural Challenges
20256 004Lecture (3 Units)Open 18 / 25Mark MetcalfMo 3:30pm - 6:00pmRobertson Hall 260
 Doing Business in China is a seminar that introduces the sociological factors contributing to the PRC’s distinctive business practices. Cultural anthropology factors, such as the role of interpersonal relationships, honesty, indirection, and “face” in business and negotiations are explored. The significance of history, geography, domestic governance, and international relationships, as well as the influence of Confucianism and Daoism, are also discussed. Case studies are used to provide practical examples of Chinese business practices.
Computer Science
 CS 3240Advanced Software Development Techniques
15426 101Laboratory (0 Units)Wait List (163 / 199)220 / 220Paul McBurneyTBATBA
 Course enrollment is restricted by the lab size, not the lecture size. So if the lab section is full, the course is full, regardless if there are lecture seats that appear open. The lab section is not a scheduled lab, and it will have no specific meeting time. It accounts for the time you will spend with your group and TA each week, which you will schedule on your own.
 Course enrollment is restricted by the lab size, not the lecture size. So if the lab section is full, the course is full, regardless if there are lecture seats that appear open. The lab section is not a scheduled lab, and it will have no specific meeting time. It accounts for the time you will spend with your group and TA each week, which you will schedule on your own.
 CS 4501Special Topics in Computer Science
 Introduction to Algorithmic Economics
16028 001Lecture (3 Units)Permission38 / 20Denis Nekipelov+1MoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmOlsson Hall 011
 For computer Science majors, CS 2120 and CS 2150 are prerequisites. For economics majors, ECON 3010 (or 3110) and ECON 3720 (or 4720) are prerequisites.
 We will discuss multiple fundamental concepts that enable development of optimization and learning algorithms as well as the analysis of game-theoretic environments. A list of topics in order is provided below. - Information and competition; Economic behavior with private information; Bayesian updating and Bayesian learning - Introduction to machine learning, and PAC learnability - Complexity and bias in learning problems: Computational complexity of learning - Convex learning problems and computational stability; Regularization and regularized learning; Gradient and Stochastic gradient descent algorithms - Online learning; Distinction between full information problems and bandit problems; The concept of regret; Online classification and online convex optimization - Online learning in multi-arm bandit environments - Stability of environments with online learning agents; Nash equilibrium and Coarse Correlated equilibrium; Learning algorithms and implementation of an equilibrium; - Convergence of learning algorithms to equilibrium - linear programming, duality theory and its connection to zero-sum games and algorithm design (a.k.a., the Yao's principle) - Analysis of outcomes in non-stable environments; Price of anarchy bounds; Smoothness and other approaches for price of anarchy evaluation; From price of Anarchy to empirical price of anarchy; - System with long-run feedback; Dynamic optimization and dynamic Markov games with incomplete information; - Reinforcement learning; Model-based and model-free algorithms for reinforcement learning; Reinforcement learning algorithms as strategies in dynamic Markov games.
 Cybersecurity and Elections
16612 002Lecture (3 Units)Permission60 / 45It will be taught by a group including Jack Davidson+3MoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmThornton Hall E316
 CS 3710 is a prerequisite for this course. ** This course is required for the VA Cyber Navigator Internship Program for Summer 2022. If you are interested in the internship and this course is full - please contact Angela (angelao@virginia.edu) to register. Those pursuing the internship will receive priority. **
 These are some topics that it will be covering: U.S. Election Systems History & Background Voting Systems Security Background & Standards Election Threats, Vulnerabilities, and Attacks Election Architecture and Controls Minimum Security Standards (MSS) Cybersecurity Careers in the Public Sector
 Signal Processing, Machine Learning, and Control
 Signal Processing, Machine Learning, and Control
16816 006Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (8 / 199)30 / 30John StankovicMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmRice Hall 340
 Sensors, signal processing, machine learning, and control are at the heart of cyber physical systems (CPS). CPSs integrate cyber with the physical world, e.g., the Internet of Things. This class covers the principles in the above 4 areas with special emphasis on how those principles are used in practice. The class includes team-based projects using smart watches and machine learning.
 Computational Biology / Biological Computing
 Computational Biology / Biological Computing
Website  19944 009Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (30 / 199)60 / 60David EvansMoWe 12:30pm - 1:45pmOlsson Hall 018
 This course will look at connections between computing and biology, with a focus on DNA. It will include computational methods used in biology focusing on how computing can be used to analyze and design DNA, as well as opportunities to use biological substances and ideas to compute. No previous background in biology is expected (although we do expect all participants to be living biological organisms). Expected computing background is having successfully completed cs2150 and at least one of cs3102 or cs4102.
 Cryptocurrency
Website  20479 010Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (61 / 199)90 / 90Aaron BloomfieldMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmThornton Hall E303
 Will Bitcoin hit $100k? $200k??? We'll find out! CS 3710, Introduction to Cybersecurity, is a strict pre-req for this course.
 This course will cover the technical aspects of how cryptocurrencies and related technologies work. Topics covered will include: legal and ethical concerns, encryption, anonymity, peer-to-peer networking, mining and hashing on both CPUs and GPUs, programming on a blockchain, and cryptocurrency exchanges and mining pools. CS 4710 (Intro to Cybersecurity) is a strict pre-req.
 CS 8501Special Topics in Computer Science
 TBD
 Neural Network Verification
Website  19201 003Lecture (3 Units)Open13 / 20Matthew DwyerFr 1:30pm - 4:15pmRice Hall 340
 We will study emerging research on verification of neural network behavior. We will work through the text by Albargouthi (https://verifieddeeplearning.com/) and the survey paper on the topic (https://arxiv.org/abs/1903.06758) and then identify specific research themes for exploration as part of student projects. The course will involve study of the foundations of these techniques as well as practical issus in implementing scalable solutions. Students will be expected to have a graduate background in machine learning, software testing and analysis, and appropriate mathematical background, i.e., like what might be had from a graduate theoretical computer science course.
Dance
 DANC 3559New Course in Dance
 Movement & Environment(s)
 Movement & Environment(s)
19058 001SEM (1 - 3 Units)Open 10 / 15Kathryn SchetlickTuTh 5:00pm - 6:15pmDrama Education Bldg 115C
 In this practice-based course open to all, we will reexamine the ways we relate to our/the environment(s) and generate strategies for a new environmental ethics that calls a human-centered world into question. Through reading, writing, conversing, and moving we will consider how somatic and artistic practices might shift our ecological understandings. Together we will think/move through concepts of ‘body’ and ‘environment,’ ask questions of and through modes of perception and the sensorial, and experiment with an expanding empathy to enact new relations. In the end, we will create group and personal practices to rehearse these new relational movement values. What new possibilities, lines of thought/movement might an embodied inquiry reveal about humans, earth, ‘nature,’ the climate crisis and their relations? How might we feel into new understandings of complex ecologies? How might the practice of feeling expand our empathic capacities?
Digital Humanities
 DH 8991DH Certificate Core Course: Introduction to Digital Humanities
Website  14015 001SEM (3 Units)Closed5 / 5 (18 / 24)Alison BoothTu 2:00pm - 4:30pmBryan Hall 328
 This seminar is a graduate-level introduction to the history, theory, and methods of the digital humanities. All students enrolled full-time in any graduate program at UVA are eligible, and no prior training is expected. In it, we will cover a range of historical, disciplinary, technical and contemporary issues in digital humanities. It is focused on digital humanities in the context of literature and language, but it also considers more general cultural, epistemological, and methodological issues. Examples include how maps and other spatial and temporal perspectives are enabled by the digital; the conditions of print and archival materials in the age of digital reproduction; emergent/cy concerns about textual analysis, machine learning/AI, privacy, security, surveillance. This course is also designed to introduce students to areas of digital humanities activity at this university. Students should come away from the course with a solid understanding of the origin of digital humanities, the kinds of work done under that label, the opportunities to participate in DH research at UV, the research insights offered by digital humanities methods, and the applicability of those methods to the student’s own research interests. The course is offered each spring semester. It is REQUIRED for all students enrolled in the graduate certificate in digital humanities. Assignments include readings and class presentations; two short autobiographical essays (your narrative about digital humanities, for a possible Certificate portfolio); your contribution of materials or pedagogical ideas for this course (how do we learn DH?); a "project review" evaluation of a digital project; a researched blog post; drafted grant proposal (in collaboration with other student(s); a final outline proposal for a digital project.
Electrical and Computer Engineering
 ECE 1501Special Topics in Electrical & Computer Engineering
 Frontiers in Electrical & Computer Engineering
21015 001Lecture (1 Units)Open 13 / 24Xu YiTh 4:00pm - 4:50pmRice Hall 011
 This is a faculty-led, student-taught course for first-year SEAS students. This course will feature weekly seminars by ECE guest speakers and student-led discussions on cutting-edge electrical and computer engineering research themes, including: IoT; artificial intelligence & machine learning; health & medical applications; modern devices (nanoelectronics, photonics, renewable energy); applications for astronomy; and emerging quantum technology. No prerequisite, no homework, no exam, and students will be evaluated by class participation.
 This is a faculty-led, student-taught course for first-year SEAS students. This course will feature weekly seminars by ECE guest speakers and student-led discussions on cutting-edge electrical and computer engineering research themes, including: IoT; artificial intelligence & machine learning; health & medical applications; modern devices (nanoelectronics, photonics, renewable energy); applications for astronomy; and emerging quantum technology. No prerequisite, no homework, no exam, and students will be evaluated by class participation. Tentative seminar topics: (1) ECE in science (2 weeks): Detecting exoplanets and imaging black holes with ECE technologies. (2) ECE in health applications (3 weeks): surgical robots, understanding the brain, and wearable bioimaging (student speaker). (3) ECE in artificial intelligence, machine learning, cyber security, and the internet of things (3 weeks). (4) Modern ECE devices (3 weeks): devices for renewable energy, nanoelectronics, and integrated photonics. (5) Quantum technology (student speaker, 3 weeks): quantum computing, quantum information, and state-of-the-art quantum systems.
 Rossum's Universal Robots (R.U.R.)
21309 003Lecture (1 Units)Open 1 / 24Keith WilliamsTBATBA
 This course, led by students, will examine Karel Čapek's 1920 science fiction play, "Rossum's Universal Robots" or "R.U.R." This seminal drama, first performed in 1921, gave us the word "robot" …and many related concepts and concerns. Students will revisit early perceptions of robotic technology and refresh the key ideas underlying Čapek's drama, in light of recent developments, e.g. artificial intelligence, machine learning, and autonomy.
 This course, led by students, will examine Karel Čapek's 1920 science fiction play, "Rossum's Universal Robots" or "R.U.R." This seminal drama, first performed in 1921, gave us the word "robot" …and many related concepts and concerns. Students will revisit early perceptions of robotic technology and refresh the key ideas underlying Čapek's drama, in light of recent developments, e.g. artificial intelligence, machine learning, and autonomy.
 ECE 4501Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering
 Optical Quantum Electronics
Website  16654 001Lecture (3 Units)Open8 / 10 (8 / 30)Xu YiMoWe 11:00am - 12:15pmRice Hall 032
 Prerequisites: ECE 3209-Electromagnetic field
 Quantum electronics, the study of light and matter interaction, has become the cornerstone in many areas of optical science and technology. The course will start with reviewing the principle of lasers followed by introducing the generalized nonlinear wave equations. This course will cover typical nonlinear effects and their applications in telecommunication, ultrafast laser, quantum computing/information and chemical/bio spectroscopy.
 Matrix Analysis in Engineering and Science
Syllabus  19672 003Lecture (3 Units)Open6 / 12 (14 / 25)Gang TaoTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmThornton Hall E304
 In this senior-graduate course of Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering, students are provided the opportunities to have an in-depth study and understanding of matrix analysis concepts, algorithms, and applications, including eigenvalues and eigenvectors, linear transformation, similarity transformations, commonly used factorizations, canonical forms, Hermitian and symmetric matrices, and positive definite matrices. In addition, these concepts and theory will be illustrated by some engineering and science applications such as those in learning, control, signal processing, and optimization. This course studies some fundamental and advanced characteristics and transformations of matrices which are the basic elements for system modeling (such as dynamic and evolving models) and algorithm development (such as adaptive and leaning schemes) in engineering and science fields. It is focused on concepts, properties and applications of general and special matrices commonly seen in the engineering and science literature. Its goal is to build solid foundations of matrix analysis for students to pursue advanced study and research in their fields.
 Self Powered Systems Design for the IoT
Website  20959 004Lecture (3 Units)Open7 / 9 (18 / 30)Benton CalhounTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amMechanical Engr Bldg 215
 This course will cover the convergence of a hierarchy of topics related to the emerging field of self-powered, energy harvesting wireless sensing systems. These topics include low power IC design, embedded hardware, embedded software, networks, energy harvesting, security, system modeling and simulation, data, and cyber physical systems (CPS) considerations. The course follows a project-centric format as it explores the emerging area of self-powered, batteryless system design.
 This course will cover the convergence of a hierarchy of topics related to the emerging field of self-powered, energy harvesting wireless sensing systems. These topics include low power IC design, embedded hardware, embedded software, networks, energy harvesting, security, system modeling and simulation, data, and cyber physical systems (CPS) considerations. The course follows a project-centric format as it explores the emerging area of self-powered, batteryless system design.
 ECE 4784Wireless Communications
16289 001Lecture (3 Units)Open5 / 20 (7 / 40)Prof. Cong ShenTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmThornton Hall D223
 Prerequisites: An undergraduate-level understanding of probability (APMA 3100) and linear algebra (APMA 3080) is assumed. Signals and systems, digital communications (ECE 4710), and stochastic process (ECE6711) are preferred but not required. Students are also expected to have working knowledge of at least one of the common programming languages (Matlab, Python, C/C++, etc).
 This is an entry-level course on wireless communications. Primary emphasis will be upon wireless channel propagation and modeling, digital modulation and detection, synchronization, equalization for ISI channels, multi-user access, and wireless standards ranging from WiFi 802.11 series to cellular 5G. The goal is to teach fundamental and core techniques that enable physical layer wireless communications.
 ECE 6501Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering
 Optical Quantum Electronics
Website  16655 001Lecture (3 Units)Open0 / 20 (8 / 30)Xu YiMoWe 11:00am - 12:15pmRice Hall 032
 Quantum electronics, the study of light and matter interaction, has become the cornerstone in many areas of optical science and technology. The course will start with reviewing the principle of lasers followed by introducing the generalized nonlinear wave equations. This course will cover typical nonlinear effects and their applications in telecommunication, ultrafast laser, quantum computing/information, and chemical/bio spectroscopy.
 Matrix Analysis in Engineering and Science
Syllabus  19675 003Lecture (3 Units)Open8 / 12 (14 / 25)Gang TaoTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmThornton Hall E304
 In this senior-graduate course of Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering, students are provided the opportunities to have an in-depth study and understanding of matrix analysis concepts, algorithms, and applications, including eigenvalues and eigenvectors, linear transformation, similarity transformations, commonly used factorizations, canonical forms, Hermitian and symmetric matrices, and positive definite matrices. In addition, these concepts and theory will be illustrated by some engineering and science applications such as those in learning, control, signal processing, and optimization. Some advanced assignments will be given to graduate students. This course studies some fundamental and advanced characteristics and transformations of matrices which are the basic elements for system modeling (such as dynamic and evolving models) and algorithm development (such as adaptive and leaning schemes) in engineering and science fields. It is focused on concepts, properties and applications of general and special matrices commonly seen in the engineering and science literature. Its goal is to build solid foundations of matrix analysis for students to pursue advanced study and research in their fields.
 Self Powered Systems Design for the IoT
Website  20960 004Lecture (3 Units)Open11 / 21 (18 / 30)Benton CalhounTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amMechanical Engr Bldg 215
 This course will cover the convergence of a hierarchy of topics related to the emerging field of self-powered, energy harvesting wireless sensing systems. These topics include low power IC design, embedded hardware, embedded software, networks, energy harvesting, security, system modeling and simulation, data, and cyber physical systems (CPS) considerations. The course follows a project-centric format as it explores the emerging area of self-powered, batteryless system design.
 This course will cover the convergence of a hierarchy of topics related to the emerging field of self-powered, energy harvesting wireless sensing systems. These topics include low power IC design, embedded hardware, embedded software, networks, energy harvesting, security, system modeling and simulation, data, and cyber physical systems (CPS) considerations. The course follows a project-centric format as it explores the emerging area of self-powered, batteryless system design.
 Matrix Analysis in Engineering and Science
Syllabus  20654 602Lecture (3 Units)Open1 / 30Gang TaoTBATBA
 In this senior-graduate course of Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering, students are provided the opportunities to have an in-depth study and understanding of matrix analysis concepts, algorithms, and applications, including eigenvalues and eigenvectors, linear transformation, similarity transformations, commonly used factorizations, canonical forms, Hermitian and symmetric matrices, and positive definite matrices. In addition, these concepts and theory will be illustrated by some engineering and science applications such as those in learning, control, signal processing, and optimization. Some advanced assignments will be given to the group of graduate students. This course studies some fundamental and advanced characteristics and transformations of matrices which are the basic elements for system modeling (such as dynamic and evolving models) and algorithm development (such as adaptive and leaning schemes) in engineering and science fields. It is focused on concepts, properties and applications of general and special matrices commonly seen in the engineering and science literature. Its goal is to build solid foundations of matrix analysis for students to pursue advanced study and research in their fields.
Economics
 ECON 1559New Course in Economics
 Seminar in Behavioral Economics
 Economic Insights: A Behavioral Primer
20642 001Lecture (1 Units)Permission 15 / 20Charles Holt+1Th 7:00pm - 7:50pmMonroe Hall 114
 The course will use classroom simulations and lab reports to help students discover key insights about economic behavior and policies.
Education-Curriculum, Instruction, & Special Ed
 EDIS 2200Designing Art, Music, and Games
Website  21267 1PRA (3 Units)Open3 / 15Glen BullMoWe 12:00pm - 12:50pmRidley Hall 125
 EDIS 2200 Designing Digital Art, Animations, and Music provides an introduction to design and creativity through use of computers to create art and music. There are no prerequisites – any undergraduate student with an interest in digital arts is eligible to enroll in the course.
Creative Writing
 ENCW 3310Intermediate Poetry Writing I
11670 001WKS (3 Units)Permission 8 / 12Debra NystromWe 2:00pm - 4:30pmWeb-Based Course
 The course will meet outdoors on grounds when weather permits. This is a weekly 2.5-hour once-weekly class for students advanced beyond the level of ENCW 2300. Emphasis is on workshop of students' own poems, with focused writing exercises and written responses to relevant outside reading, as well as class discussions on issues of contemporary poetry. Final poetry portfolio required. INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION IS REQUIRED FOR ENROLLMENT. Please request instructor permission through SIS and apply through email. APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: writing sample of 4-5 poems IN A SINGLE WORD DOCUMENT with a cover sheet including name, year, email address, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting. Submit application to Prof. Nystrom at dln8u@virginia.edu . Applications will be considered on a rolling basis as soon as registration opens. For full consideration, email your application as soon as possible. The final deadline will be December 15th. Classes do sometimes fill before the final submission deadline, but an effort will be made to hold a few seats open until after the deadline.
 A weekly 2.5-hour once-weekly class for students advanced beyond the level of ENCW 2300. Emphasis is on workshop of students' own poems, with focused writing exercises and written responses to relevant outside reading, as well as class discussions on issues of contemporary poetry. Final poetry portfolio required.
 REVOLUTIONARY LETTERS
19192 002WKS (3 Units)Permission 9 / 12Brian TeareMo 2:00pm - 4:30pmBrooks Hall 103
 Instructor Permission is required for enrollment. Please request instructor permission through SIS and apply through email. APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: writing sample of 4-5 poems with a cover sheet including name, year, email address, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting. Submit application in a single document to Prof. Teare at bt5ps@virginia.edu. Applications will be considered on a rolling basis as soon as registration opens. For full consideration, email your application as soon as possible. The final deadline will be December 15th. Classes do sometimes fill before the final submission deadline, but an effort will be made to hold a few seats open until after the deadline.
 Powered by the urgent sense that “I have just realized that the stakes are myself/I have no other/ransom money, nothing to break or barter but my life” Diane Di Prima read her Revolutionary Letters on street corners, at love-ins, and at protests. After several years of writing and performing her counter-cultural poems and publishing them in small mimeographed chapbooks she gave away for free, Di Prima published the first full-length version of Revolutionary Letters with City Lights Books in 1971. Its fiftieth anniversary edition joins other recently reissued revolutionary titles spanning the 1970s, including June Jordan’s Passion and N.H. Pritchard’s The Matrix, whose respective feminist and avant-garde reinventions of the Black Arts continue to challenge and change the conventions of poetry. The reading component of this course will begin with Di Prima, Jordan, and Pritchard in the semester’s first half, and in its second half proceed to contemporary inheritors of their revolutionary work, T’ai Freedom Ford, Juliana Spahr, Douglas Kearney, Joshua Escobar, and Vanessa Jimenez Gabb. The workshop component of this course will begin with short poems written in response to prompts derived from our reading of Di Prima, Jordan, and Pritchard. These prompts will be designed to help us think about the flexible, powerful relationship between cultural critique and poetic form, between revolution and the literal letter. The long workshop portion of the course will offer each of us the chance to expand upon those poems in longer manuscripts. Throughout the semester, in both critical discussions and workshops, we’ll discuss the conceptual, political, and poetic aspirations of the work we read, and explore the possibilities of coming together as poets during a time of great cultural change.
 ENCW 3610Intermediate Fiction Writing
 Making and Uncovering: Adventures in Writing Fiction
11673 002WKS (3 Units)Permission 0 / 12Anna Martin-BeecherTuTh 5:00pm - 6:15pmBryan Hall 203
 Instructor Permission required. To apply: 1. Request instructor permission in SIS. 2. Email am2aw@virginia.edu with a 3-5 page fiction sample. 3. In the body of your email, detail your reasons for wanting to take the course, your experience of writing workshops and details of any other creative writing classes you're applying to. For full consideration, please apply by December 15th.  
 Intermediate Fiction Writing is a class for students who have advanced beyond the level of ENCW 2600 and would like to take their writing further. This workshop-based course will involve creating new work and developing it through feedback, honing your editorial skills through responding to the work of your peers, and reading widely. To apply: 1. Request instructor permission in SIS. 2. Email am2aw@virginia.edu with a 3-5 page fiction sample. 3. In the body of your email, detail your reasons for wanting to take the course, your experience of writing workshops and details of any other creative writing classes you're applying to. For full consideration, please apply by December 15th.  
 Reading & Writing Short Fiction
19203 003WKS (3 Units)Permission 9 / 12Elizabeth DentonWe 5:00pm - 7:30pmDawson's Row 1
 Instructor Permission is required for enrollment. Please request instructor permission through SIS and apply through email. APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: a writing sample with a cover sheet including name, year, email address, major, prior workshop experience, other workshops to which you are applying. Submit application in a single document to ed3m@virginia.edu. For full consideration, email your application by December 15th. Admission is rolling.
 Read short stories to inhale the many shapes the form can take, the sharp complexities that exist below the surface. Creative responses to weekly reading assignments encourage students to focus on the most basic building block of the short story: scene making. In addition to six 3-5 page response exercises, students will write a long story and revise it. Active classroom participation and love of reading and writing are essential.
 ENCW 4820Poetry Program Poetics
 Return to Grounds
13003 001SEM (3 Units)Permission10 / 12Kiki PetrosinoWe 2:00pm - 4:30pmBryan Hall 233
 In this seminar, we will focus on renewing our artistic connections to UVA now that we’re back in community together. We’ll read published works of poetry by writers with ties to the University, Charlottesville, & the region. We’ll also think about & explore the physical space of Grounds as a site for reading, writing, researching, & sharing poems. Please note: this course is designed for students in the Area Program in Poetry Writing, but open to other students on a space-available basis & after consultation with the Instructor.
 In this seminar, we will focus on renewing our artistic connections to UVA now that we’re back in community together. We’ll read published works of poetry by writers with ties to the University, Charlottesville, & the region. We’ll also think about & explore the physical space of Grounds as a site for reading, writing, researching, & sharing poems. This course will be structured as a small, discussion-based seminar & you’ll have a choice of creative or critical writing projects. Please note: this course is designed for students in the Area Program in Poetry Writing, but open to other students on a space-available basis & after consultation with the Instructor.
 ENCW 4920Poetry Program Capstone
 POETRY PROGRAM CAPSTONE COURSE
13004 001SEM (3 Units)Permission9 / 10Lisa SpaarTBATBA
 ENCW 4920. POETRY PROGRAM CAPSTONE The Capstone seminar is a semester-long investigation of faculty and student-directed, shared texts that allows advanced poetry writing students in the Area Program in Poetry Writing to begin to think beyond the single poem and into ways poetry manuscripts can be organized, to become more deeply aware of their own patterns and evolving aesthetic, and to create new work. The course involves a combination of weekly discussion of individual student manuscripts and one-on-one conferring with the instructor. After mid-term, students are assigned a graduate student mentor, who also offers the poetry manuscript a close reading. The course culminates in the production by each student of a manuscript of original poetry. This is course is open only to fourth-year students in the Area Program in Poetry Writing, who must apply for permission to enroll through SIS. Day and time of the course will be determined once all participants’ schedules are taken into account.
 ENCW 5310Advanced Poetry Writing II
 Advanced Poetry Writing (for graduate or undergraduate credit)
19129 001WKS (3 Units)Permission11 / 12Debra NystromTh 2:00pm - 4:30pmWeb-Based Course
 The course will meet outdoors on grounds when weather permits. This workshop is for students with prior experience in writing and revising poetry, and it welcomes students working in the poetry/prose hybrid space as well. It is open to advanced undergraduate students, MFA fiction students, and graduate English students. The class will involve discussion of student poems and of assigned reading, with particular attention to issues of craft. Students will be expected to write and revise six to eight poems, to participate in class discussion and offer detailed notes in response to other students’ work, to keep a poetry journal, to attend several poetry readings, to turn in close-reading responses to three assigned readings, and to participate in a group presentation. INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION IS REQUIRED FOR ENROLLMENT. Please request instructor permission through SIS and apply through email. APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: writing sample of 4-5 poems IN A SINGLE WORD DOCUMENT with a cover sheet including name, year, email address, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting. Submit application to Prof. Nystrom at dln8u@virginia.edu . Applications will be considered on a rolling basis as soon as registration opens. For full consideration, email your application as soon as possible. The final deadline will be December 15th. Classes do sometimes fill before the final submission deadline, but an effort will be made to hold a few seats open until after the deadline.
 This workshop is for students with prior experience in writing and revising poetry, and it welcomes students working in the poetry/prose hybrid space as well. It is open to advanced undergraduate students, MFA fiction students, and graduate English students. The class will involve discussion of student poems and of assigned reading, with particular attention to issues of craft. Students will be expected to write and revise six to eight poems, to participate in class discussion and offer detailed notes in response to other students’ work, to keep a poetry journal, to attend several poetry readings, to turn in close-reading responses to three assigned readings, and to participate in a group presentation.
English-Literature
 ENGL 2500Introduction to Literary Studies
 Literature and Sexuality
19285 003SEM (3 Units)Wait List (12 / 199) 20 / 20John ModicaTuTh 5:00pm - 6:15pmNew Cabell Hall 411
 This introductory-level course takes a critical look at the two course topics: 1. the study of literature and 2. the role of sexuality in our everyday lives. We will read a mix of modern and contemporary fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, criticism, and theory. In our engagement with these readings, we will examine our experiences with art and literature and their relationship to sexuality in its broadest sense: how we think, act, and feel with others. How do formal experiments with language shape the ways we understand sexuality? And how does sexuality shape the form of literature? We will pay attention to these questions with works by Audre Lorde, Essex Hemphill, Walt Whitman, Qwo-Li Driskill, Andrea Long Chu, Langston Hughes, Adrienne Rich, Rabih Alameddine, Ching-In Chen, Susan Stryker, Andrea Abi-Karam and Kay Gabriel, and Saidiya Hartman. This course fulfills the Second Writing Requirement and Humanities Area Requirement and counts toward elective requirements for majors/minors in English and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. You will produce a portfolio of writing tailored to your personal and professional goals: assignments include two essays and six reflection exercises completed over the course of the semester. No prior experience with literature or gender and sexuality studies at the college level is necessary. All course texts will be available for free as PDFs and open-access resources.
 ENGL 2502Masterpieces of English Literature
 Locating Jane. Or, Putting Austen in her Place
19112 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (3 / 199) 20 / 20Alison HurleyMoWeFr 9:00am - 9:50amAstronomy Bldg 265
 Jane Austen is everywhere – at movie theaters, on coffee mugs, in myriad sequels, parodies, and re-imaginings of her novels. How is it that an author whose works are so deeply embedded in her own time remains a contemporary phenomenon? How is it that novels depicting a remarkably thin slice of a defunct society enjoy such broad appeal? In this course we will try to answer these questions by “putting Austen in her place.” We will carefully situate Austen’s novels within a number of specific but overlapping interpretive terrains – literary, political, intellectual, and gendered. By deeply contextualizing Austen, I believe we will be in a better position to assess her significance in both her world and in our own. In order to perform this work we will need to develop the skills necessary for reading and writing effectively about texts. Specifically, we will aspire to read closely, write precisely, argue persuasively, ask good questions, employ strong evidence, and take interpretive risks. Our readings will most likely include: Sense and Sensibility, Emma, Mansfield Park and Persuasion. Sorry, no P&P!
 ENGL 2506Studies in Poetry
 The Poetics of Love and Exile
 To read the description for this course, click on section number link on the left!
20640 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (7 / 199) 20 / 20Michelle GottschlichMoWeFr 1:00pm - 1:50pmShannon House 109
 What does it mean to live in exile? A terrible-break up, marginalization, a pandemic – can these be considered experiences of exile? How does one reimagine love and hope under these circumstances? How can writing help us to survive? In this course, we will ponder these questions while studying the works of poets who wrote in and through political, social, and personal exiles. We will explore how writing connects us to who we love, what we've lost, and the possible futures that can – in the radical space of a poem – be imagined into life. Please take into consideration that some assigned texts contain sexually explicit content as well as violent experiences related to queerphobia, racism, and colonialism in America. This is a LGBTQ+ positive class.
 Introduction to Poetry
21111 002SEM (3 Units)Open 6 / 18Walter JostTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmBryan Hall 203
 How does a written poem on a page—its lines now taken out of their historical contexts, its author no longer around to ask, its time past—manage to mean anything at all when spoken aloud? How do words work, anyway (because, after all, they do work)? This course centers on patient close reading of poems of the twentieth century, and what’s in them for us in the twenty-first century, by Robert Frost, Elizabeth Bishop, Wallace Stevens and others. This course satisfies the second writing requirement.
 ENGL 2508Studies in Fiction
 Virginia Woolf
 Virginia Woolf
19120 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (7 / 199) 20 / 20Stephen ArataMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmShannon House 111
  The broad purposes of this course are to introduce you to ways of understanding texts within the discipline of literary studies and to improve your skills in critical thinking and writing. In addition to fulfilling the Second Writing Requirement, the course can be used complete the prerequisite to the English major. We will spend the semester reading widely in the work of Virginia Woolf, one of the greatest writers in the English language. In addition to three of her novels (Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, and Orlando), our reading list will include short fiction and essays as well as excerpts from her letters and journals. In addition to regular brief writing assignments, requirements will include three 5-6 page essays. The course is designed both for those who have read Woolf before and those who will be reading her for the first time.
 Displacement and Migration
19132 002SEM (3 Units)Wait List (5 / 199) 20 / 20David CoyocaTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmShannon House 111
 In this course we will analyze Asian-American, African-American, and Indigenous stories of displacement, (im)migration, and settlement. Through comparative analysis, we will discuss the various intersections between and divergences among these texts, paying particular attention to the shared histories the texts evidence. Our goal is to form interpretive arguments that address the ways in which the texts negotiate ideas about the nation, nation building, and national belonging.
 Novels Then And Now
19286 003SEM (3 Units)Wait List (3 / 199) 20 / 20Jessica SwobodaTuTh 5:00pm - 6:15pmNew Cabell Hall 191
 What links novels? How do characters, ideas, themes, and preoccupations resonate across time? Rather than studying influence, this course examines how novels of different historical moments speak to and with one another. We'll focus specifically on (messy) relationships, belonging, identity, and narration in 6 modern and contemporary novels (all subject to change): Nella Larsen's Passing (1929) and Brit Bennett's Vanishing Half (2020), Tove Jansson's True Deceivers (1988) and Teju Cole's Open City (2011), and Edith Wharton's The Age of Innocence (1920) and Sally Rooney's Normal People (2018). This course fulfills the second writing requirement as well as the 2500-level course requirement for the English major.
 Dream Schools: Fictions of the College Campus
19711 004SEM (3 Units)Wait List (22 / 199) 20 / 20Piers GellyMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmShannon House 109
 This course will focus on the literary genre of “campus novels,” meaning works of fiction set on and around college campuses (plus some high schools). We will consider why writers might choose campuses as a setting or subject for fiction, and what choices they make in creating these fictive or fictionalized schools on the page. Texts might include THE ART OF FIELDING, by Chad Harbach; THE IDIOT, by Elif Batuman; THE SECRET HISTORY, by Donna Tartt; THESE VIOLENT DELIGHTS, by Micah Nemerever; AS LIE IS TO GRIN, by Simeon Marsalis; REAL LIFE, by Brandon Taylor; LONER, by Teddy Wayne; PREP, by Curtis Sittenfeld; TRUST EXERCISE, by Susan Choi; HARRY POTTER AND THE SORCERER’S STONE, by J.K. Rowling; the TV shows THE CHAIR and DEAR WHITE PEOPLE; and short fiction by Donald Barthelme, Danielle Evans, and others.
 The Novel in US Literary History
19925 005SEM (3 Units)Wait List (7 / 199) 20 / 20Victoria OlwellMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmMaury Hall 110
 This course investigates the novel in US literary history. Beginning with works from the early republic and concluding with very recent novels, the syllabus set us up to explore a variety of ways that novels have been written, consumed, and understood to function in public life. So that we can study a wide array of styles and historical moments, the novels typically will be on the short side. Authors will likely include Hannah Webster Foster, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Rebecca Harding Davis, Stephen Crane, Nella Larsen, Katherine Anne Porter, James Baldwin, Louise Erdrich, Toni Morrison, Tommy Orange, and Ocean Vuong. Assignments will include biweekly short essays, along with two formal essays of 5-7 pages. This is a discussion-based course, so your class participation will be vital.
 ENGL 2527Shakespeare
 Shakespeare and Tragedy
19099 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (7 / 199) 20 / 20Clare KinneyTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmNew Cabell Hall 415
 Click on the blue number to the left to see full description of the course.
 This course will explore 4 major tragedies: Hamlet, Othello, King Lear and Macbeth. We’ll contextualize our readings by looking at theories of tragedy ranging across several centuries as we explore the particular kinds of action and transgression that are labeled “tragic,” discuss “tragic knowledge,” and consider the role of gender and (in the case of Othello) race in shaping the dynamics of tragedy. We’ll also give some thought to the interpretation of tragedy in performance. The course will probably conclude with a reading of The Winter’s Tale, a play which invites us to consider what it means to write beyond tragedy. Requirements: regular attendance and lively participation in discussion, three 5-7 page papers, occasional e-mail postings, and a final examination.
 ENGL 2559New Course in Introduction to English Literature
 Intro to Environmental Thought and Practice
 Intro to Environmental Thought and Practice
20390 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed60 / 0 (60 / 0)Deborah Lawrence is do-teaching this class with Steve Cushman and Paul FreedmanMoWeFr 1:00pm - 1:50pmMonroe Hall 134
 You may sign up for ETP 2030, PLAP 2030 or ENGL 2559 and get credit for the ETP major. Note: This course cannot be used by FWR+ students to fulfill the first writing requirement.
 What is our relationship to the environment? Physical, chemical, or biological phenomena can be described by environmental scientists, but "problems" are defined by our response to them, contingent on culture, history, and values more than measurem​ents. Solving environmental problems lies in the political sphere, but our debates draw on discourses from literature, philosophy, economics, and ethics. Explore the basis for environmental thought and practice. Crosslisted with ETP 2030 and PLAP 2030.
 ENGL 2599Special Topics
 Revenge!
 Revenge!
18885 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (11 / 199) 20 / 20Emelye KeyserTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amShannon House 109
 Shakespeare’s Macduff hopes revenge will be a “medicine” for his “grief”; the scientist Francis Bacon calls it “wild justice”; but in practical terms what a revenge story often translates to is a big old pile of bodies on the stage or the page. In this course we’ll read five plays from the height of the revenge tale’s popularity (ca. 1600), including two by Shakespeare. We’ll also look at some Greek and Roman antecedents, and we’ll follow the theme into 19th- and 20th-century short stories and 21st-century film. Expect ghosts, guts, blinding, bludgeoning, incest, cannibalism, tragedy, tyranny, and some great death speeches. This course is for English majors and non-majors alike--no experience with Shakespearen language, the Renaissance, drama or literary criticism required.
 The World Wars in European Literature
19113 002SEM (3 Units)Wait List (7 / 199) 20 / 20Sarah ColeMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmMonroe Hall 114
 The First and Second World Wars transformed European culture and challenged poets, novelists, and filmmakers. Why create art in a time a mass violence and upheaval? How could a poem, film, or literary narrative do justice to the raw experience of war? In this course, we will explore a diverse group of responses from authors in Britain, France, and Germany, ranging from the gritty realism of Remarque’s All Quiet on the Western Front to the elegant modernism of Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway. We will pay equal attention to literary techniques and social identities, examining questions of gender, class, ethnicity, and disability in war literature. The seminar will emphasize close reading, active participation, and analytical writing. Requirements include three essays, an in-class presentation, and weekly discussion questions. Among our main texts will be poems by Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon, and Paul Celan; novels by Virginia Woolf, Erich Maria Remarque, and Irene Nemirovsky; memoirs by Vera Brittain and Elie Wiesel; and films by Jean Renoir and Louis Malle.
 Self Portrayal in Poetry and Visual Art
 Self-Portraiture in Visual Art & Poetry
19221 003SEM (3 Units)Wait List (8 / 199) 20 / 20Lisa SpaarMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmShannon House 109
 ENGL 2599 Self-Portraiture in Visual Art & Poetry We live in an age of easy and ubiquitous self-portrayal. Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Skype, YouTube, Zoom, and other digital and cellular “galleries” allow a protean array of venues in which to post, curate, manipulate, and efface visual images and verbal profiles of “the self” with what seems like a faster than real-time alacrity. This proliferation of self-portraiture is so rampant that it’s possible for viewers and readers to become inured to its magic, craft, and power. Since antiquity, literary and visual artists have depicted themselves in their productions, a fascination that has continued unabated into the twenty-first century, spurred by advances in photography, imaging, digitalization, communication, information systems, and the widespread availability of the Internet. In this course we will look at the “selfie” from antiquity to the present, in poetry (from Sappho to Charles Wright and Kendrik Lamar) and visual art (from early Egyptian art through Rembrandt, Dűrer, Vigée-Lebrun, Kahlo, Van Gogh, Picasso, Abbassy, Sherman, Basquiat, Morimura, and others). We will visit the Fralin Museum of Art, make forays into the Studio Art and Drama departments, be visited by poets, artists and others, and in general explore what we can learn from our human fascination with self-portrayal and our compulsion to turn it into art.
 Reimagining the Bible in English Literature
19278 010SEM (3 Units)Wait List (0 / 199) 18 / 18DeVan ArdMoWeFr 11:00am - 11:50amNew Cabell Hall 338
 No single work has had a greater influence on English literature than the Bible. This course explores the varieties of biblical appropriation in English — from drama and lyric poetry to novel and film — as well as the range of attitudes toward biblical revelation, from ardent belief to skepticism and doubt, that shaped these works. We will learn to read literature in its historical context while thinking carefully about formal and literary innovation across periods. Along the way we will ponder the limits of adaptation and revision; the relation between scripture and politics; and representations of exile and otherness. No prior knowledge of the Bible or English literature is necessary. We will start at the beginning, with the creation myth in Genesis, and work our way out of Eden. Other texts may include: - medieval plays about Mary - Mary Sidney’s translations of the psalms - William Shakespeare, THE WINTER'S TALE - John Milton, PARADISE LOST - John Dryden, ABSALOM AND ACHITOPHEL, one of the greatest satires in English - prose and poetry by Christina Rosetti - Hannah Crafts, THE BONDWOMAN'S NARRATIVE
 How to be Ethical?
19281 011SEM (3 Units)Open 6 / 20Nasrin OllaTuTh 8:00am - 9:15amWilson Hall 244
 How do novels, poetry, and philosophical texts teach us to relate ethically toward the stranger, the foreigner, or the other? How do we understand different cultures and peoples without reducing them to our already established frames of reference? How do we imagine otherness? This course approaches these big questions by exploring representations of the stranger and the foreigner in African and African diasporic literature. We will look at texts such as Édouard Glissant’s Faulkner, Mississippi, Camara Laye’s The Radiance of the King, Frantz Fanon’s Black Skin, White Masks, and Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart alongside reflections on the relation between ‘ethics and aesthetics’ by Immanuel Kant, Martha Nussbaum, Elaine Scarry, and Giorgio Agamben.
 The Way We Work: 19th Century Life and Labor
19282 012SEM (3 Units)Open 17 / 20Shalmi BarmanMoWe 5:00pm - 6:15pmNew Cabell Hall 107
 ENGL2599 The Way We Work Now: 19th Century Life and Labor What does the way we work say about who we are? How does human labor transform both the external world and the human subject? How does work feel — alienating, liberating, both? The writers and artists of the long nineteenth century following the Industrial Revolution confronted these questions at a time of rapid technological, economic, and political change. In this course we will read widely across the literature of the period to recover these historical perspectives and evaluate them through the lens of our present moment. This course fulfills the second writing requirement as well as the 2500-level course requirement for the major. Assigned reading will include poetry (Blake, Wordsworth, the Brownings, Whitman), prose (Dickens, Hardy, Melville, Morris), selected non-fiction, and one dramatic text. You will not need to purchase any texts. Course requirements include two essays, short reading responses, one in-class group presentation, and lively participation.
 The Victorians: Fellow Moderns
 Precarious Victorians
19283 013SEM (3 Units)Open 16 / 20Alex BuckleyMoWeFr 1:00pm - 1:50pmNew Cabell Hall 107
 The Victorians are often thought to be traditional to a fault: backward-looking, repressed, and in denial of change. Upon closer examination, however, we might discover a more complex reality. The Victorians are frequently concerned observers of seismic societal upheaval—of globalization and empire, of race, gender, and class, of urban-industrial development and rural decline. In this course, we will study three works of literature to see how Victorian writers register a changing world's shocks, anxieties, and opportunities, and to weigh their relevance to our present. The writers considered might include Charles Dickens, Charlotte Brontë, Wilkie Collins, and/or George Eliot. This course fulfills the second writing requirement. It can also fulfill the 2500-level course requirement for the major. Its assignments will include formal papers, 5 to 6 pages in length, as well as shorter, more informal writing interspersed throughout the semester.
 Literary Form and Western Philosophy
19284 014SEM (3 Units)Open 4 / 20Justin StecTuTh 8:00am - 9:15amShannon House 107
 Literary Form and the Philosophical Imagination
 Good philosophy often reads like an immersive work of imaginative literature. This course welcomes anyone willing to think critically and collaboratively about the role imagination has played, and continues to play, in shaping the West’s most pressing philosophical concerns. Together, we will read works of philosophical literature and literary philosophy which will push back against the vision of philosophy as a stuffy academic affair. The reading load will be significant (on average about 75 pages per week) and there will be a strong focus on analytical writing in the service of vigorous classroom discussion. Expect to encounter a mix of philosophers, novelists, poets, and playwrights—Plato, Simone de Beauvoir, Cornell West, T.S Eliot, H.D, Albert Camus, and Jacques Derrida all included. Come to class ready to discuss, argue, and collaborate! Assignments comprise one short (5 pages) close-reading paper, one long (10-12 pages) final paper, the chance to facilitate a seminar discussion, and an in-class final exam. Peer-review writing workshops and one-on-one conferences with the instructor are built into the course schedule.
 ENGL 2910Point of View Journalism
Syllabus  18884 001SEM (3 Units)Closed 38 / 0 (38 / 0)Lisa GoffTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmNew Cabell Hall 309
 No waitlist--email me if you want to join class: lg6t@virginia.edu. Some spaces may open up.
 This course examines the history and practice of “point-of-view” journalism, a controversial but credible alternative to the dominant model of “objectivity” on the part of the news media. Not to be confused with “fake news,” point-of-view journalism has a history as long as the nation’s, from Tom Paine and Benjamin Franklin in the eighteenth century to "muckrakers" like Ida B. Wells Barnett and Ida Tarbell at the end of the nineteenth, and “New Journalism” practitioners like Tom Wolfe, Hunter Thompson, and Barbara Ehrenreich in the twentieth. Twenty-first century point-of-view practitioners include news organizations on the right (Fox News, One America News Network) and left (Vice, Jacobin, MSNBC, Democracy Now), as well as prominent voices like Ta-Nehisi Coates, Rebecca Solnit, Jia Tolentino, and Sarah Smarsh. We will also consider the rise of “fake news.” A term formerly used to indicate the work of entertainers such as Jon Stewart and Steven Colbert, who pilloried the news (and newsmakers) in order to interpret them, “fake news” is now an established practice of the far right, as well as a political slur used to denigrate the work of mainstream (center and left-of-center) news organizations.
 ENGL 3002History of Literatures in English II
10124 100Lecture (3 Units)Open, WL (1 / 199) 173 / 240John O'Brien+1MoWe 12:00pm - 12:50pmWilson Hall 402
 William Wordsworth, Toni Morrison, Charles Dickens, Edgar Allan Poe, Virginia Woolf, Oscar Wilde, Emily Dickinson, T. S. Eliot, Phillis Wheatley, Zora Neale Hurston, W. B. Yeats: these are some—but not all— of the authors we will be reading and studying together. This class will survey literature in English from around 1800 to the present moment. We will start with the emergence of Romanticism at the beginning of the nineteenth century and trace the emergence of English as a global language and literature in our post-colonial world. Our itinerary will include stops in Britain, the United States, Africa, the Caribbean, and India. This course is part of the two-semester sequence of the history of literature in English (along with ENGL 3001) that is required of English majors, but is open to anyone interested in exploring some of the most significant works of literature of the last two-plus centuries. You do not need to have taken ENGL 3001 first; the courses can be completed in any order that works best for you.
 ENGL 3161Chaucer I
19210 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 21 / 30Rebecca RushTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmBryan Hall 235
 In this survey of The Canterbury Tales, we will dig into two central Chaucerian concerns: desire and character. As we read Chaucer’s sketches of the “sondry folk” pilgrimaging to Canterbury and their variously merry and grave tales, we will consider how he portrays in the pilgrims an array of longings and habits. We will debate about when he depicts longing as vivacious, natural, and fundamental—the very “roote” of life—and when he represents it as ridiculous, tragic, or cruel. Examining the portraits of human desire presented by Chaucer will require us to reckon with the shocking, the controversial, and the brutal aspects of his art. Chaucer’s portraits will also push us to think deeply about how he imagines character: How does he paint a picture of the Pardoner or the Wife of Bath? What does he think we need to see and hear in order to come to know them? We will approach Chaucer’s art with seriousness and his language with rigor, but we will also enjoy the unique pleasures of his storytelling and his ability to craft yarns that feature a husband sleeping in a barrel, a knight charged with moving all the rocks in Brittany, a tryst in a pear tree, and several well placed farts.
 ENGL 3260Milton
19262 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 24 / 30James KinneyTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmNew Cabell Hall 058
 In this course we will study the the interconnections between Milton's literary career and the general political and cultural ferment of Civil War England. We will sample the dizzying range of generic innovations and experiments that inform Milton's work from short early lyrics and prose pamphlets through Paradise Lost. Class requirements, lively participation, one short and one longer paper, and a final exam.
 ENGL 3380The English Novel I
 Run Runaway!
19205 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (5 / 199) 30 / 30Cynthia WallMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmGibson Hall 242
 In 1775, the German physicist and satirist Georg Christoph Lichtenberg declared that England had the best novels because England had the best roads. Daughters could escape from their fathers; sons could strike out on adventures; young ladies could make Entrances into the World; criminals could flee their crimes; highwaymen could make their fortunes. This course will explore the ways that eighteenth-century British novels themselves explored time and space, country and city, roads and inns, carriages and ships, in the fiction of Jane Austen, John Bunyan, Frances Burney, Francis Coventry, Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, Eliza Haywood, Samuel Richardson, and Tobias Smollett.
 ENGL 3482The Fiction of Empire
19122 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (0 / 199) 30 / 30Paul CantorMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmMaury Hall 110
  This course deals with the interplay between literature and British imperialism in the late nineteenth century. Topics covered include orientalism and the representation of the foreign, the ideology of imperialism, literary critiques of imperialism, the impact of imperialism on domestic life in Britain, the problem of heroism on the imperial frontier, the intersection between fiction of empire and other genres (such as science fiction, horror stories, and detective fiction), as well as the relationship between late Victorian popular culture and serious fiction, especially the emergence of literary modernism out of fiction of empire. Authors studied include Rider Haggard, Rudyard Kipling, Jules Verne, Mark Twain, Robert Louis Stevenson, H. G. Wells, and Arthur Conan Doyle. Course requirements include two short papers and a final examination.
 ENGL 3540Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature
 Global Nineteenth Century Fiction
 Global Nineteenth-Century Fiction
20186 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (2 / 199)30 / 30Stephen ArataMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmBryan Hall 235
 In this course we will read novels (all superb examples of narrative art) drawn from a wide range of cultures and countries. The overarching goal is to engage with these works not from the perspective of their separate national traditions but with an awareness of the novel as a thoroughly transnational literary form, bound up in networks of authors and readers stretching around the globe. Likely candidates for the syllabus include Jane Austen and Charlotte Bronte (England), Walter Scott (Scotland), George Sand and Gustave Flaubert (France), Mikhail Lermentov (Russia), Multatuli (Denmark), Benito Pérez Galdós (Spain), Machado de Assiz (Brazil), Bankim Chandra Chatterjee (India), and Mary Prince (Bermuda). Course requirements will include two 5-6 page essays, a final exam, and a handful of shorter writing assignments. All the readings will be in English.
 ENGL 3560Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature
 Modern American Poetry
19200 002Lecture (3 Units)Open27 / 30Kevin HartTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmNew Cabell Hall 032
 This seminar introduces students to a range of American poets living and working, for the most part, in the first half of the twentieth century. We shall read Robert Frost, Wallace Stevens, Marianne Moore, William Carlos Williams, and Elizabeth Bishop. Of particular interest are the ways in which these poets respond to the challenges of modernism in its various inflections — especially high modernism and low modernism — and their relationships, real or imagined, with Romanticism in its several modes. In addition to poems by the authors, we shall also read some of their prose and letters to see what light is cast on their writing and its contexts.
 Modern and Contemporary Poetry
20764 003Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (6 / 199)30 / 30Mark EdmundsonTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmBryan Hall 328
 The mid-twentieth century in America sees and explosion of excellent poetry. More different kinds of consequential poets, more different sorts of poems than the nation had seen before. We’ll start with the understated genius, Elizabeth Bishop, and move on to Robert Lowell, inspired early prophet of the sorrows of American empire. Then on to others: the daring, ever fertile Sylvia Plath; superb political and erotic poet, Adrienne Rich; Robert Hayden, poet of African American grief and hopes; Allen Ginsberg, author of the culture-shaking Howl. There will be encounters too with the hyper-perceptive Gwendolyn Brooks; visionary Amy Clampitt; Southern sage James Dickey; James Merrill, perhaps America’s most sophisticated poet; and gritty, tender James Wright. A mid-term quiz, a final quiz, and a paper at the end on the poet you care about most.
 ENGL 3960The Lyric
19265 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 17 / 20John ParkerTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmBrooks Hall 103
 ENGL 3960: Lyric Working more or less chronologically we'll cover some of the major lyric poems in English from the sixteenth to the twentieth century. Our central goals: to learn to read poetry as carefully as possible; to gain a sense of "period" or "movement" where something of that sort may be discerned; to develop an analytic prose style adequate to the challenges of complicated literature.
 ENGL 4500Seminar in English Literature
 Sally Hemings University
 Sally Hemings University: Connecting Threads
19107 001SEM (3 Units)Permission 5 / 12Lisa WoolforkWe 5:30pm - 8:00pmBryan Hall 203
 Sally Hemings University: Connecting Threads is a community-engaged course that considers what it means to stitch a new story, one that centers those who’ve been marginalized and remembers those who’ve been erased.
 This new community-engaged course uses a Black feminist liberation model to pull on the threads between past and present, literature and craft, culture and community using the lens of sustained attention and study. Students will engage with a variety of creative assignments that involve reading, studying, writing and making.In addition to careful consideration of literary, cultural, art, scholarly, and media studies, participants have the opportunity to create micromonuments: these assignments might take the form of digital, sonic, needle art, painting, NFTs, fiber art, writing and more.
 Gothic Forms
19206 002SEM (3 Units)Wait List (9 / 199) 18 / 18Cynthia WallMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 209
 Gothic literature burst onto the scene in the eighteenth century with ruined castles, ethereal music, brooding villains and surprisingly sturdy heroines, all performing as metaphors of our deepest fears and fiercest resistances. Throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries the gothic continued as a genre of cultural anxiety. This seminar will survey gothic literature through both history and genre: the classic novels, Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto (1764), Matthew Lewis’s The Monk (1797), Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818), Robert Louis Stevenson’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886), Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House (1959), and Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey (1818); 18thC German vampire poetry and poems by John Keats, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Robert Browning, Christina Rossetti, and Sylvia Plath; the plays of Matthew Lewis and Richard Brinsley Peake; and the short stories of Edgar Allan Poe, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, W. W. Jacobs, Richard Matheson, and Stephen King. And we will ask ourselves: What are we afraid of?
 Milton and Whitman: "Paradise Lost" and "Song of Myself"
20981 003SEM (3 Units)Wait List (1 / 199) 18 / 18Mark EdmundsonTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmShannon House 108
 Open to all undergraduate students
 Milton and Whitman ENGL 4500 – We’ll read with care and imagination what are perhaps the two greatest long poems in the English language, John Milton’s Paradise Lost and Walt Whitman’s Song of Myself. Both are works of palpable genius, but of very different kinds. Milton’s poem is committed to hierarchy, order and degree. In his cosmos, justified subordination and command are the highest ideals. His world at its best is firmly and yet in its way flexibly ordered. He is a brilliant exemplar of true conservatism. Whitman is much different. “Unscrew the locks from the doors / Unscrew the doors themselves from their jams,” Walt chants. Whitman wants to dissolve all needless boundaries in the interest of perfect democratic equality. He wants to undo the barriers between old and young, rich and poor, women and men. And he does so, at least imaginatively, in Song. We’ll read the poems for what they are in themselves. But we’ll also consider them as brilliant exemplars of the progressive mind and its conservative counterpart. Students may be surprised as to where they fall in this mapping. With any luck, we’ll find ourselves, in the words of the Whitmanian, Wallace Stevens, “more truly and more strange.” A mid-term paper, a final essay, and some short writing assignments.
 ENGL 4520Seminar in Renaissance Literature
 Reinventing Hamlet
19100 001SEM (3 Units)Permission18 / 18Clare KinneyTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 068
 Click on course number to the left to see full description of the course.
 Hamlet is the most celebrated Shakespearean play; it is also perhaps the most mysterious and elusive. It has a huge afterlife in both elite and popular culture; it has been reinterpreted, appropriated and adapted by commentators and creative artists to serve very different agendas at various historical moments. In this seminar we will first (re)read the play very carefully before exploring the resonance of its reshaping in a variety of media. We’ll look at dramatic reinventions (e.g. Tom Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead); novelistic reinventions (e.g. John Updike’s Gertrude and Claudius), cinematic reinventions (e.g. the Hamlet movies of Almereyda and Olivier); we’ll also pay attention to global Hamlet and to the critical reception of the play. Why does this particular play provoke so many creative reinventions? And what do its more subversive rewritings suggest about the cultural forces underlying the apparently unceasing need to revisit and/or “correct” and/or supplement Shakespeare’s project? Course requirements: regular attendance and lively participation in discussion, an oral presentation, one very short and one long paper, a portfolio of e-mail responses.
 ENGL 4540Seminar in Nineteenth-Century Literature
 Literature and Science
19123 001SEM (3 Units)Closed15 / 15 (15 / 15)Paul CantorTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmMaury Hall 113
 This course will study the impact of science on nineteenth-century literature and in particular the development of science fiction as a genre, with emphasis on the epoch-making works of H. G. Wells. We will examine the ways in which science posed a challenge to literature and called into question the very notion of artistic truth. But we will also consider the ways in which science served as a new form of inspiration for fiction writers, beginning with Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. One of the main subjects of the course will be the impact of Darwin and Darwinism. We will discuss the relation of science to the Victorian crisis of faith and also explore the interrelation of science and the British Empire. Writers studied will include Jules Verne, Robert Louis Stevenson, Edwin Abbott, and Arthur Conan Doyle. One class presentation, one long paper, and class participation.
 ENGL 4559New Course in English Literature
 The Bible Part 2: The New Testament
20245 001Lecture (3 Units)Open9 / 18John ParkerTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 132
 The stories, rhythms, and rhetoric of the Bible have been imprinting readers and writers of English since the seventh century. Moving through much of the New Testament, from the Gospels to Revelation, this course focuses on deepening biblical literacy and sharpening awareness of biblical connections to whatever members of the class are reading in other contexts. Along the way we will discuss English translations of the New Testament; the process of canonization; textual history; and the long trail of interpretive approaches, ancient to contemporary. Our text will be the New Oxford Annotated Bible, 5th ed. All are welcome. No previous knowledge of the Bible is needed or assumed. It can be taken before or after the Bible Part 2: The Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, taught by Professor Stephen Cushman.
 ENGL 4560Seminar in Modern and Contemporary Literature
 Global Speculative Fiction
 Global Speculative Fiction
Website  19092 001SEM (3 Units)Open17 / 18Debjani GangulyTu 3:30pm - 6:00pmNew Cabell Hall 056
 Assessments include weekly one-page Collab postings, 2 research essays, and one in-class oral presentation
 The course will explore the emergence of speculative fiction as a global literary form in our contemporary age. Broadly encompassing the genres of fantasy, science fiction, horror and alternative history, speculative fiction is any kind of fiction that creates a narrative world which may or may not resemble the world we live in. This kind of fiction embodies alternative ideas of reality including magic, space or time travel, alternative realities, or alternative histories. In recent years, there has been a proliferation of speculative fiction from Africa, Latin America, and the Asia Pacific that figure alternative futures for peoples oppressed by centuries-long colonialism. The rapid proliferation of digital technology and the accelerating effects of anthropogenic climate change have given a new edge to this body of fiction. We will study the emergence of counter-factual utopian and dystopian narratives, Afrofuturism and animism, the specter of fossil futures, and apocalyptic fiction on environmental collapse through a range of exciting works. The goal of this course is to understand the rise of speculative fiction as a literary form and a mode of world-making that captures cataclysmic shifts in human and non-human worlds that can no longer be comprehended by social, political, and moral frameworks of our recent past and present.
 The Modern Memoir
 The Modern Memoir
19241 002SEM (3 Units)Open, WL (1 / 199)14 / 16James SeitzWe 3:30pm - 6:00pmShannon House 111
 Click on course number to the left to see full description of the course.
 This course will explore the evolution of memoir since the mid-twentieth century. In addition to reading several remarkable memoirs, we’ll examine various theories of autobiographical writing and criticism of the memoir as a genre. Students should also expect that, along with writing about what they read, they’ll have the option of writing about their own lives for at least one assignment, in order to learn about the creation as well as the interpretation of memoir.
 ENGL 4561Seminar in Modern Literature and Culture
 Poetry in a Global Age
19096 001SEM (3 Units)Open15 / 18Jahan RamazaniMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmMaury Hall 113
 How does poetry articulate and respond to the globalizing processes that accelerate in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries? In this seminar on modern and contemporary global poetry in English, we will explore the world in poetry and poetry in the world. The writers we will read range from modernists like Eliot, Yeats, Stevens, and McKay to postcolonial poets of Ireland, India, Africa, Britain, and the Caribbean, such as Walcott, Heaney, Goodison, Philip, Kolatkar, Okot p’Bitek, Okigbo, Daljit Nagra, and Kei Miller. Among requirements are active participation; reading quizzes; co-leading of discussion; and two substantial papers involving research and close reading. Our texts will be from volumes 1 and 2 of The Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry, third edition, as supplemented by other poems and critical texts, as well as a volume of poetry by Kei Miller.
 ENGL 4590Seminar in Literary Genres
 Poetry and Theology
19197 001SEM (3 Units)Open8 / 18 (18 / 25)Kevin HartTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amAstronomy Bldg 265
 This seminar focuses on the writings of two important modern poets, Gerard Manley Hopkins and Geoffrey Hill. The one is Catholic, and the other questions religion at every level while also remaining open to the possibility of faith. Each poet raises major theological issues: belief, doubt, ecstasy, martyrdom, revelation, transcendence, and theodicy, among them. We will read, as closely as possible, some poems and prose writings by each poet, consider their theological contexts, and examine the ways in which theological issues are folded in their poems. Students will write two essays, one on each poet.
 ENGL 5559New Course in English Literature
 Renaissance Poetry and Poetics
 Open to undergraduate and graduate students
19211 002SEM (3 Units)Wait List (4 / 199)15 / 15Rebecca RushTuTh 12:35pm - 1:50pmBryan Hall 233
 What is poetry? What sets it apart from other modes of writing, thinking, imagining, feeling, being? What are the distinctive tools at the poet’s disposal? How do these tools work, and how can we describe their workings? Should poetry be plain or intricate, delightful or didactic, passionate or rational, heavenly or human? In this course, we will explore the many Renaissance responses to these questions by reading sixteenth- and seventeenth-century verse alongside early modern poetic manuals. We will inspect a range of poetic styles and genres, beginning with a deep dive into Shakespeare’s sonnets. Other readings will include sonnets by Petrarch, Philip Sidney, and Mary Wroth; epyllia by William Shakespeare and Christopher Marlowe; country house poems by Aemilia Lanyer, Ben Jonson, and Andrew Marvell; odes by Ben Jonson, John Milton, Abraham Cowley, and Andrew Marvell; and poems about ecstatic love by John Donne and Katherine Philips. This course is open to undergraduate and graduate students.
 What is Postcolonial Critique?
 What is Postcolonial Critique?
19287 003SEM (3 Units)Open11 / 15Nasrin OllaTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmShannon House 109
 What is postcolonial critique? Is it a way of reading a text? Does it refer to the processes of historical decolonization in places like Africa, India, and the Caribbean? Or is it a practice of critical thought that can be used to think across multiple spaces and times? In this course, we will approach these questions by reading a wide range of writers including Gayatri Spivak, Dipesh Chakrabarty, Édouard Glissant, Achille Mbembe, Susan Buck-Morss, and C. L. R. James. The final project invites students to reflect upon the themes of revolutionary thinking, the global and universal, and questions of ethics.
 ENGL 5830Introduction to World Religions, World Literatures
 THE BIBLE
19090 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (3 / 199)15 / 15Stephen CushmanWe 10:00am - 12:30pmDawson's Row 1
 The stories, rhythms, and rhetoric of the Bible have been imprinting readers and writers of English since the seventh century. Moving through selections from the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament, from Genesis to Revelation, this course focuses on deepening biblical literacy and sharpening awareness of biblical connections to whatever members of the class are reading in other contexts. Along the way we will discuss English translations of the Bible; the process of canonization; textual history; and the long trail of interpretive approaches, ancient to contemporary. Our text will be the New Oxford Annotated Bible, 5th ed. All are welcome. No previous knowledge of the Bible needed or assumed.
20145 002SEM (3 Units)Open1 / 18 (18 / 25)Kevin HartTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amAstronomy Bldg 265
 This seminar focuses on the writings of two important modern poets, Gerard Manley Hopkins and Geoffrey Hill. The one is Catholic, and the other questions religion at every level while also remaining open to the possibility of faith. Each poet raises major theological issues: belief, doubt, ecstasy, martyrdom, revelation, transcendence, and theodicy, among them. We will read, as closely as possible, some poems and prose writings by each poet, consider their theological contexts, and examine the ways in which theological issues are folded in their poems. Students will write two essays, one on each poet.
 ENGL 8500Studies in English Literature
 Black Women's Rhetorics
 Black Women's Rhetorics
19245 002SEM (3 Units)Open9 / 15Tamika CareyTh 2:00pm - 4:30pmBryan Hall 233
 This seminar explores Black women’s rhetorical practices as a critical tradition. Through an interdisciplinary lens grounded in Rhetoric, Composition, and Literacy Studies scholarship and informed by work in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, and literary criticism, we will work to identify the techne, the praxis, and the implications of Black women’s choice to use written, visual, and aural strategies to shape and reshape themselves and their worlds. By necessity, we will consider questions such as: how do Black women define and name conditions of their subjectivity and the constraints to their public participation and livelihood? What is the connection between Black feminist thought and Black women’s literacies? Which genres, arguments, and strategies do they rely upon to address personal or sociopolitical concerns? And what might Black feminist/womanist rhetorical criticism or pedagogy involve? Ideally, this work will enable us to outline how Black women’s rhetorics operate as interpretive, interventionist, and instructional resources. Our readings will involve a combination of primary texts and critical writings. The scholars and public intellectuals we are likely to engage include: Jacqueline Jones Royster, Marcyliena Morgan, Elaine Richardson, Gwendolyn Pough, Carmen Kynard, Patricia Hill Collins, Kimberlé Crenshaw, Beverly Guy Sheftall, Audre Lorde, Brittney Cooper, and Moya Bailey. Assignments may include: a discussion leading and course presentation activity, short weekly writing assignments, a brief annotated bibliography, and a seminar-length essay.
 ENGL 8540Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature
 Literature and Science
19124 002SEM (3 Units)Closed15 / 15 (15 / 15)Paul CantorTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmMaury Hall 113
 This course will study the impact of science on nineteenth-century literature and in particular the development of science fiction as a genre, with emphasis on the epoch-making works of H. G. Wells. We will examine the ways in which science posed a challenge to literature and called into question the very notion of artistic truth. But we will also consider the ways in which science served as a new form of inspiration for fiction writers, beginning with Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. One of the main subjects of the course will be the impact of Darwin and Darwinism. We will discuss the relation of science to the Victorian crisis of faith and also explore the interrelation of science and the British Empire. Writers studied will include Jules Verne, Robert Louis Stevenson, Edwin Abbott, and Arthur Conan Doyle. One class presentation, one long paper, and class participation.
 ENGL 8560Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature
 Caribbean SF and Fantasy
 Caribbean SF and Fantasy
19209 001SEM (3 Units)Open11 / 15Njelle HamiltonMo 3:30pm - 6:00pmNew Cabell Hall 066
 Seminar focused on Caribbean writers working at the cutting edge of SF/F, and novels, stories, film and artwork that center Caribbean settings, peoples, and culture, even as they expand the definition of genre. Authors and auteurs from the English-, Spanish- and French-speaking Caribbean might include: Nalo Hopkinson, Tobias Buckell, Karen Lord, Patrick Chamoiseau, Junot Díaz, Rita Indiana, Marcia Douglas, Leone Ross, Ernest Pepin, René Depestre, Agustín de Rojas and Yoss.
 ENGL 8570Studies in American Literature
 "Approaches to American Culture"
20246 003SEM (3 Units)Permission9 / 15 (9 / 15)Sandhya ShuklaTu 3:30pm - 6:00pmNew Cabell Hall 066
 This course explores the theory and practice of American cultural studies, a set of intellectual formations that contemplates the contours of interdisciplinarity. It conceives of culture in the broadest way, capturing a more anthropological understanding of the quotidian (rituals, customs, conversations, worldviews), as well as more aesthetic projects of a creative imagination (literature, film, music). Culture’s deep stratification by class, race, gender and sexuality is a special focus as we consider seemingly coherent expressions of the United States. Any number of materials could be considered under the expansive rubric of American cultural studies, but this particular inquiry begins in the twentieth century to develop a conversation about how the nation has been imagined as bounded within but also overlapping with global modernity. Here we necessarily cast “America” as provisional, contingent, and potentially opening of continental and hemispheric horizons. We will pay attention to how academic fields (Americanist and other) have formed in relation to questions about spatiality, politics, language, canons, social movements, and more. Above all this class seeks to inspire an interpretive practice that can be mobilized for a range of inter/disciplinary projects across the humanities and social sciences. If we consider the meaning of a text to be derived from relationships among production, consumption and circulation, we must closely read historical, social, aesthetic and formalistic aspects together. In so doing, we hope to develop new ways to organize knowledge and get closer to how people live in and express the world. Readings for the class will range from primary works by W.E.B. DuBois, James Agee and Walker Evans, Jose Martí, and Randolph Bourne, to critical-theoretical texts by Paul Gilroy, Joseph Roach, Kathleen Stewart, Lisa Lowe, George Lipsitz, and others. Students will be required to workshop and complete a 15-20 page paper.
 ENGL 8596Form and Theory of Poetry
 Embodied Ecologies: Ecofeminist Poetry & Poetics
 EMBODIED ECOLOGIES :: ECOFEMINIST POETRY & POETICS
19204 001SEM (3 Units)Permission15 / 15Brian TeareTu 2:00pm - 4:30pmShannon House 109
 “How can we listen across species,” asks Alexis Pauline Gumbs in _Undrowned: Black Feminist Lessons from Marine Mammals_, “across extinction, across harm?” And how can the practice of poetry extend the senses, aid us in listening and speaking to, touching, and moving in ethical relation to the imperiled more-than-human world? In books like Wendy Burk’s _Tree Talks_, Bhanu Kapil’s _Humanimal_, and Zaina Alsous’ _A Theory of Birds_, poets intend themselves toward vegetal, mammalian, and avian lives in order to examine not only what is knowable of other species, but also to investigate the effects and affects of western culture’s conflation of women and animals. Much contemporary ecofeminist poetry focuses not just on ethical relation to the more-than-human world, but also to registering the impacts of settler colonialism, enslavement, war, and imperialism on the intrinsic interconnectedness between species, ecosystems, humans, and human systems. This interdisciplinary course will introduce us to ten contemporary ecofeminist poets as well as to the ecocritical discourses that inform the work they’re doing. We’ll explore their poetry and relevant ecocritical thought through five topoi – Black Anthropocenes, Listening, Indigenous Tongues, Touching, and Humanimals. Trees, birds, wolves, and insects will accompany us through the semester as we too attempt to listen across species, “to see what happens,” writes Gumbs, when we “rethink and re-feel” our own “relations, possibilities, and practices” in conversation with more-than-human beings. Assignments will range from the creative to the critical, with an emphasis on process-led research. Poets, artists, and scholars of all disciplines welcome.
 ENGL 8598Form and Theory of Fiction
 Sensoria
 SENSORIA
19238 001SEM (3 Units)Permission14 / 15Jane AlisonWe 2:00pm - 4:30pmBrooks Hall 103
 This course is designed for MFA students in Creative Writing, but I welcome others, too: please send a note about yourself and your interests to jas2ad@virginia edu.
 A studio-seminar for graduate students who want to examine their own senses and focus them consciously upon the world outside, exploring how minute, expansive, and complex sensory perceptions can be. We’ll read theoretical texts about the (more than five!) senses and their intersections with language and will examine how other writers (in a range of literary modes) have immersed themselves in capturing the sensory porosity that is the body. You’ll cycle through a series of studies of single subjects—a color or light effect, a smell, a tactile sensation, a sound, the passage of time—drawing upon close perception and your most associative mind to transform what you perceive into art. Working from these studies, you’ll develop two longer pieces that will be literary sites of artful exploration.
 ENGL 8900Pedagogy Seminar
13068 001SEM (1 - 3 Units)Permission11 / 15Stephanie CerasoWe 10:00am - 12:30pmBryan Hall 233
 This course (along with Prof. Curley's section) will be set up as instructor permission only and you’ll need to apply to enroll. You can choose whichever one fits your schedule better (both courses will have a mix of PhD, MA in Pedagogy, and second-year MFA students). When requesting permission, please note in the comments box if you have an insuperable conflict with the other section. Prof. Ceraso and Prof. Curley will balance enrollments between the two sections, accommodating people’s preferences as much as possible. In the event that your permission request is denied on SIS, that simply means that you are being asked to enroll in your second-choice section. Return to SIS and request permission to enroll in your second-choice section, and your request will be granted.
 This seminar is designed to help you navigate your first semester of teaching ENWR 1510. We will explore a range of pedagogical theories and practices—specifically in relation to teaching writing—and you will have the opportunity to develop and workshop your own materials for ENWR 1510. In addition to gaining practical knowledge about designing courses, responding to and assessing student work, etc., you will be asked to think through and begin to answer questions that will hopefully guide you throughout your teaching career: What kind of teacher do I aspire to be? What pedagogical values should inform my teaching and why? How can I make my classroom as stimulating and inclusive as possible? It is impossible to learn everything there is to know about teaching in one semester, or even in a lifetime (that is what makes teaching so interesting and exciting!). However, this class will provide you with a strong foundation for teaching at UVA—with concepts and practices you can continue to build upon, experiment with, and reimagine in your future classrooms.
 ENGL 9560Advanced Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature
 Poetry in a Global Age
 Poetry in a Global Age
19097 001SEM (3 Units)Open7 / 15Jahan RamazaniMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmMaury Hall 113
 How does poetry articulate and respond to the globalizing processes that accelerate in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries? In this seminar, we will consider modern and contemporary poetry in English in relation to transnational, global, world literary, and postcolonial theory and history. Above all our focus will be on the poetry. The writers we will read range from modernists like Eliot, Yeats, Stevens, and McKay to postcolonial poets of Ireland, India, Africa, Britain, and the Caribbean, such as Walcott, Heaney, Goodison, Philip, Kolatkar, Okot p’Bitek, Okigbo, Daljit Nagra, and Kei Miller. Requirements include active participation; co-leading of discussion; and two conference-length papers (8-10 pages). Our texts will be from volumes 1 and 2 of The Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry, third edition, as supplemented by other poems and critical and theoretical texts, and a collection of Kei Miller's.
Writing and Rhetoric
 ENWR 1510Writing and Critical Inquiry
 Writing about Culture/Society
 Writing Utopia
10597 002SEM (3 Units)Wait List (1 / 6) 18 / 18Emelye KeyserTuTh 8:00am - 9:15amShannon House 109
 For hundreds of years, people have been writing utopias to imagine worlds that prioritize different ideologies: from communism to feminism, environmentalism, equality, equity, and Christianity. This course will be dedicated to exploring some questions that arise in reading utopias. Has anyone ever imagined a utopia that works for everyone? What place is there for progress in a utopia? How does utopian thinking affect how we as political people operate in this imperfect world? This course will have you reading texts from the 16th century through to just a few years go. We'll mainly practice academic writing, but we'll also get creative with genre and audience as we think about what it would take to write our own utopias.
 Writing about the Arts
 Writing About Dreams
10599 007SEM (3 Units)Open 10 / 18Austin BensonMoWeFr 9:00am - 9:50amBryan Hall 310
 Everyone dreams. We spend almost a third of our lives dreaming, even if we don’t always necessarily remember it. Dreams help us contextualize our past, process our day-to-day lives, and visualize our future. They allow us to rationalize our hopes, desires, anxieties, and fears. They are shocking, surreal, and often strange. Nightmares, fantasies, or a combination of the two, dreams are essential to the human experience. The universality of dreams has one main benefit to us in this class: there is no shortage of material on them. We see dreams described, rationalized, and theorized about across history, from the dawn of writing to the dream journals we kept in middle school. We see them visualized in medieval art, surrealist paintings, and the ninth season of the hit television show Dallas. In this seminar, we will develop our abilities as thoughtful, critical writers while engaging with the broad and surreal world of dreams in the literary and visual arts. Our exploration of the dream-world will be a jumping-off point for a variety of writing exercises that will build up the requisite knowledge, skills, and attitudes to become insightful, precise, and nuanced writers. Our writing will range from the personal, describing and rationalizing some of our own dreams, to the analytical, responding to works critically while wrestling with a litany of questions: What do our dreams reveal about ourselves and how we process sensory experience? Are dreams merely tools for introspection, or something more? Where does a dream end and reality begin? And, most importantly—do dreams really come true? In pursuing these lines of inquiry, we will better understand ourselves and how we relate to the world around us.
 Writing and Community Engagement
 "D.I.Y. Writing, Art, and Community." Click on section number link on the left to read more!
10600 008SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Michelle GottschlichMoWeFr 11:00am - 11:50amBryan Hall 310
 D.I.Y. (or “Do It Yourself”) as it's known today, has existed for nearly a century. Taking hold in the post-war American suburbs, it has shifted dramatically through time—entering the iconoclastic punk era, Etsy mood boards, Soundcloud rap, Tik Tok videos, and more. What do these materials, scenes, makers, and movements have in common? Rhetorically rich and culturally fraught, studying D.I.Y. will get us thinking about how identities & ideas are baked into the “language” of things. Through reading, writing, analysis, and discussion, we will carefully reverse-bake these out to see what we really make of them. We’ll also practice what we study as artists and writers, and chat with visiting artists and writers about their craft. But perhaps most importantly, we’ll learn from D.I.Y. communities how to build supportive, inclusive, and non-judgmental creative spaces in which we can share our work (and ourselves) with one another. Throughout the semester, we may ponder these questions: How do we express ourselves and our ideas through the things we make in writing, art, music, design, media, fashion, movement...? How do we communicate and connect with one another? What role does writing and publishing play in this? How did they make that? Can I make that?
 Writing and Community Engagement
 "D.I.Y. Writing, Art, and Community." Click on section number link on the left to read more!
10610 019SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Michelle GottschlichMoWeFr 10:00am - 10:50amBryan Hall 310
 D.I.Y. (or “Do It Yourself”) as it's known today, has existed for nearly a century. Taking hold in the post-war American suburbs, it has shifted dramatically through time—entering the iconoclastic punk era, Etsy mood boards, Soundcloud rap, Tik Tok videos, and more. What do these materials, scenes, makers, and movements have in common? Rhetorically rich and culturally fraught, studying D.I.Y. will get us thinking about how identities & ideas are baked into the “language” of things. Through reading, writing, analysis, and discussion, we will carefully reverse-bake these out to see what we really make of them. We’ll also practice what we study as artists and writers, and chat with visiting artists and writers about their craft. But perhaps most importantly, we’ll learn from D.I.Y. communities how to build supportive, inclusive, and non-judgmental creative spaces in which we can share our work (and ourselves) with one another. Throughout the semester, we may ponder these questions: How do we express ourselves and our ideas through the things we make in writing, art, music, design, media, fashion, movement...? How do we communicate and connect with one another? What role does writing and publishing play in this? How did they make that? Can I make that?
 Writing about the Arts
 Writing about Television
12010 026SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Cristina GriffinTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmBryan Hall 310
 In this class, we will practice critical inquiry and hone our writing skills by engaging with one of the most familiar aesthetic forms of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries: the television show. As we read, watch, discuss, and write about television together, our goal will be to approach this familiar form with a fresh perspective, not taking anything about television for granted. How do the formal elements of television shows—their genres, storytelling capacities, narrative features, and serial formats—build compelling worlds? How can we approach these tv worlds analytically while also valuing the emotional impact of television? How do television shows critique and generate culture? How do shows build arguments about experiences of race, gender, sexuality, and class? Over the course of the semester, we will read scripts that turned into episodes, read critical writing about television, and of course we will also watch a variety of tv episodes. But more than anything, we will write about television: we will build up our capacity to analyze television and then turn that inquiring perspective onto our own writing. If television shows build worlds out of words — and if those worlds can and do have a giant impact, for better or worse, on the world we live in — then we will take seriously how we can develop our own writing and re-approach our practices of world-building and meaning-making through our words.
 Writing about the Arts
 Writing about Film
11740 030SEM (3 Units)Wait List (4 / 6) 18 / 18Marissa KessenichMoWeFr 11:00am - 11:50amNew Cabell Hall 415
 ENWR 1510 approaches writing as a way of generating, representing, and reflecting on critical inquiry. Students contribute to an academic conversation about a specific subject and learn to position their ideas and research in relation to the ideas and research of others. Student writing is at the center of the course, encouraging students to think on the page and preparing them to reflect on contemporary forms of expression. Students read and respond to each other’s writing in class regularly, and they engage in thoughtful reflection on their own rhetorical choices as well as those of peers and published writers. In this particular ENWR 1510 course, we will be writing about film and its influence on our everyday lives. We will watch several movies and read articles that critique and analyze film using different approaches. You will be asked to respond to these readings as well as write papers that demonstrate your own film analyses. This class asks students to think critically about film, considering questions like: How do movies shape our lives and influence our perception of the world and our place in it? How do our own experiences and identities inform our taste? What makes “good” film, and who gets to say so? Why does the film industry continue to be so influential? This class does not require extensive movie knowledge.
 Writing about Culture/Society
 The Almighty Dollar: Writing about Money, Mobility & the American Dream
11739 036SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Jessica WalkerTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmBryan Hall 334
 In this section of ENWR-1510, we will be writing about money, mobility and the American Dream. This is not a finance or economics course. You need no knowledge of supply and demand, commodities, derivatives or interest rates. Instead, you will be expected to examine and analyze the way money intersects with society, culture and the human condition. Each week we will engage with writing and materials that reflect how money influences the world we live in. You will be expected to generate responses to the assigned topics, engage in discussion with your peers, then use this process to better your writing. We will collectively take up questions such as--What is the role of money in American culture? Does material wealth make us happier? Is financial gain a necessary part of the American Dream? What does it mean to be a sell out? What happens when creativity and money collide? What do popular narratives--such as the films The Wolf of Wall Street, Wall Street and The Pursuit of Happyness--say about the culture of making money in America? About wealth, inequity and upward mobility? What financial and monetary trends can we identify as unique to Gen Z? How do social media trends--such as influencers, finfluencers and TikTok's creator fund--reflect attitudes about money in contemporary culture? We will examine money’s moral, cultural and social complexity in order to better understand the power of the Almighty Dollar.
 Writing about the Arts
12246 041SEM (3 Units)Wait List (1 / 6) 18 / 18Matthew DavisTuTh 8:00am - 9:15amBryan Hall 332
 (Click on the section number "12246" on the left for a description of this section.)
 ENWR 1510: Writing and Critical Inquiry Points of View Mr. Matthew Davis Spring 2022 This course is intended to help you develop writing skills that will help you succeed while you are at UVA and also after you graduate. The theme for this section will be “points of view” in fiction. We will read and write about short stories, with a focus on different ways of telling a story. Most of the readings will be taken from an unusual anthology, Points of View, ed. Moffett and McElhaney, in which the stories are classified according to the mode of narration used in the story. One section of the anthology contains “interior monologues,” in which we seem to be inside the main character’s head, overhearing his or her thoughts; another section contains “dramatic monologues,” in which we overhear the narrator speaking aloud to another character; a third, letters written by the characters; a fourth, diary entries; and so on. We will look at eleven modes of narration and study two examples of most modes, reading about twenty stories in all. Your main task for the semester will be to write three essays in which you make a claim about one of the stories we have read and support that claim with evidence. Each essay will be drafted, workshopped, and revised. The target length for the revisions of these essays is 1000 to 1200 words, but quality of writing, thinking, and argumentation will count more than length. I will also ask you to write two short narratives (target length: 700-900 words) in which you “try out” one of the modes of narration we have studied. These narratives will be written once, without opportunity for revision. You will not be required to invent a new plot; you can re-tell a story or fairy tale or TV episode using one of the modes of narration. In addition, you will learn some principles of composition and complete a library assignment.
 Writing about Identities
 Music, Writing, Identity
12250 045SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Stephanie CerasoMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmBryan Hall 332
 Everyone’s life has a soundtrack. We make playlists for different moods, activities, and events. We associate particular songs with moments in our personal and cultural histories. We memorize lyrics and repeat them like mantras. We sing loudly (usually off key) in our showers and cars. We love songs. We hate songs. We love to hate songs. Music is a powerful force in our everyday lives. This writing-intensive seminar will focus on the connection between music and identity. We will explore a wide range of music and writing about music, examining questions such as: How does music influence the ways we make sense of our lives? In what ways do our identities (race, gender, class, ethnicity, sexuality, etc.) inform our musical tastes and distastes? What is the relationship between music and writing? Why does music matter? In addition to reading and writing about music, students in this class will learn to write with music. In other words, you will be incorporating music into some of the course projects, such as an autobiographical playlist and a podcast about the development of musical tastes. No previous experience with digital audio editing is necessary.
 Writing about Culture/Society
 The Almighty Dollar: Writing about Money, Mobility & the American Dream
12253 048SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Jessica WalkerTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmBryan Hall 334
 In this section of ENWR-1510, we will be writing about money, mobility and the American Dream. This is not a finance or economics course. You need no knowledge of supply and demand, commodities, derivatives or interest rates. Instead, you will be expected to examine and analyze the way money intersects with society, culture and the human condition. Each week we will engage with writing and materials that reflect how money influences the world we live in. You will be expected to generate responses to the assigned topics, engage in discussion with your peers, then use this process to better your writing. We will collectively take up questions such as--What is the role of money in American culture? Does material wealth make us happier? Is financial gain a necessary part of the American Dream? What does it mean to be a sell out? What happens when creativity and money collide? What do popular narratives--such as the films The Wolf of Wall Street, Wall Street and The Pursuit of Happyness--say about the culture of making money in America? About wealth, inequity and upward mobility? What financial and monetary trends can we identify as unique to Gen Z? How do social media trends--such as influencers, finfluencers and TikTok's creator fund--reflect attitudes about money in contemporary culture? We will examine money’s moral, cultural and social complexity in order to better understand the power of the Almighty Dollar.
 Writing about Culture/Society
 The Almighty Dollar: Writing about Money, Mobility & the American Dream
12562 058SEM (3 Units)Wait List (3 / 6) 18 / 18Jessica WalkerTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amBryan Hall 334
 In this section of ENWR-1510, we will be writing about money, mobility and the American Dream. This is not a finance or economics course. You need no knowledge of supply and demand, commodities, derivatives or interest rates. Instead, you will be expected to examine and analyze the way money intersects with society, culture and the human condition. Each week we will engage with writing and materials that reflect how money influences the world we live in. You will be expected to generate responses to the assigned topics, engage in discussion with your peers, then use this process to better your writing. We will collectively take up questions such as--What is the role of money in American culture? Does material wealth make us happier? Is financial gain a necessary part of the American Dream? What does it mean to be a sell out? What happens when creativity and money collide? What do popular narratives--such as the films The Wolf of Wall Street, Wall Street and The Pursuit of Happyness--say about the culture of making money in America? About wealth, inequity and upward mobility? What financial and monetary trends can we identify as unique to Gen Z? How do social media trends--such as influencers, finfluencers and TikTok's creator fund--reflect attitudes about money in contemporary culture? We will examine money’s moral, cultural and social complexity in order to better understand the power of the Almighty Dollar.
 Writing about Culture/Society
 Writing Utopia
13092 066SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Emelye KeyserTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 044
 For hundreds of years, people have been writing utopias to imagine worlds that prioritize different ideologies: from communism to feminism, environmentalism, equality, equity, and Christianity. This course will be dedicated to exploring some questions that arise in reading utopias. Has anyone ever imagined a utopia that works for everyone? What place is there for progress in a utopia? How does utopian thinking affect how we as political people operate in this imperfect world? This course will have you reading texts from the 16th century through to just a few years go. We'll mainly practice academic writing, but we'll also get creative with genre and audience as we think about what it would take to write our own utopias.
 Writing about Identities
 History and the Self
20156 071SEM (3 Units)Closed 15 / 15Jeddie SophroniusMoWe 5:00pm - 6:15pmNew Cabell Hall 068
 In an ever-changing time, how does history influence our identity? How does our identity change or remain the same? We function in what is called the “composite self.” The language and body language we use when we’re in public are different than the ones we use when we’re with our family and close friends. Then there’s the self that we never show to anyone else. The many layers of history (social, familial, and personal) shape our composite self. This course aims to equip you with the tools and space to explore the many parts of yourself through writing. We will read how various writers write about their history and identity, and we will embark on a journey to explore what constitutes who we are, and how we got there. Students will write three major writing projects throughout the semester.
 ENWR 2510Advanced Writing Seminar
 Writing about Identities
 Writing Regret and Repair
12420 004SEM (3 Units)Wait List (5 / 6) 16 / 16Tamika CareyTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmBryan Hall 312
 If the old saying is true and everyone actually makes mistakes, then why are apologies so hard to write and why are some apologies more easily dismissed than others? This section of ENWR 2510 explores these questions about regret and repair from an identity-based perspective to strengthen your methods for writing. Said differently, we will consider how class, race, gender, and other identity markers influence public perceptions of error and impression management. We will also investigate social expectations of how regret should be expressed. In doing so, we will pursue the goal of this course, which is to cultivate and refine your analytical reading techniques, invention processes, composing practices, and strategies for revision and publication.
 ENWR 2520Special Topics in Writing
 Writing AI, You, and Me
 Writing AI, You, and Me
13732 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (9 / 10) 16 / 16Patricia SullivanMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmBryan Hall 312
 How has technology changed the way we talk and write about ourselves as humans? This intermediate writing course explores the language we use to describe, understand, and debate the effects of technological advances on society and on our concepts of the human. We will consider issues such as artificial intelligence (AI) and art, AI and labor, the posthuman, surveillance, among others. All majors are welcome. No special knowledge is necessary; just bring your sense of curiosity and a willingness to write. As a class, we may read literature, popular nonfiction essays, scholarly research, and watch the occasional science fiction film or scientific documentary. I will invite you to compose a variety of texts -- reflective, analytical, exploratory, argumentative – and conduct some original research. Through class workshops, peer reviews and individual conferences, you will develop your metacognition of your writing processes, explore the rhetorical options available to you, consider the consequences and implications of specific rhetorical strategies, as well as broaden your sense of the resources available to you in and beyond academic contexts. Students will write weekly in short and long forms and have regular opportunity to revise with feedback from peers and professor through peer reviews, workshops, and conferences. This course fulfills the SWR and WE requirement.
 Vegan Writing
 Vegan Writing
18773 005SEM (3 Units)Wait List (0 / 10) 16 / 16Lindgren JohnsonTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmBryan Hall 310
 What does it mean to write vegan? “Plant-based” cookbooks and PETA pamphlets might come to mind. But what happens when we approach veganism not just in terms of diet or even the essential work of animal liberation but as a deeper and wider foundation for thinking in ethical relation to all species, including our own, and the broader environment? What is the writing that organically emerges out of this foundation? This class will explore what becomes possible to think and write when we assume a foundation of vegan nonviolence. This shared commitment will allow us to see violence that we have been taught does not really count as violence, and we’ll ask why and how the larger culture continues to discipline all of us to think, write, and act in ways that destroy others’ relations, cultures, and lives, dulling our intellectual and ethical capacities and impoverishing our own lives in the process. The other and exciting side of the coin, then, is how vegan nonviolence opens us up to worlds and lives that otherwise could not be apprehended, and we will explore how vegan writing animates rather than destroys lives, even as it does not presume to know those lives fully. Many of our readings, which will include a range of material (children’s literature, scientific articles on animal cognition, philosophy, critical race theory, agroecology, film theory, literary criticism, and more), will attend not only to vegan thinking and writing but to the experience of living vegan, which can be isolating, and the class will be a space of support for those who experience such isolation. We will conclude the semester with independent projects that will give you room to go your own direction but that will also receive the benefit of class feedback in a workshop environment. We will not be approaching veganism, then, as a solution simply to be applied to inherently violent systems (the “Go Vegan!” mantra) but as an ethical and intellectual foundation that yields revolutionary thinking and writing regarding, among other things, other-than-human autonomy and sovereignty, gender and racial equality, environmental health, equitable land access, and prison abolition. Rather than narratives and systems of lack, punishment, and violence, how can we create narratives—and out of these narratives, systems—of plenitude, support, and love?
 ENWR 3550Advanced Topics in Digital Writing and Rhetoric
 Mapping
 Mapping
20712 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (1 / 10) 16 / 16Kevin SmithTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmBryan Hall 330
 Maps are ubiquitous and central to our engagement with the world, yet we seldom consider them as texts. This class explores mapping as a form of writing that is tied to technology, history, culture, identity, and politics. Students will learn how to better read and interpret maps and how to use mapping to describe, analyze, and engage with places.
Environmental Sciences
 EVSC 4559New Course in Environmental Science
 Geoscience in the Field
20122 001Lecture (2 Units)Closed20 / 20 (20 / 20)Ajay Limaye+1We 6:00pm - 7:50pmClark Hall 101
 Lectures occur on February 16, February 23, March 2, and March 16. The field trip dates are March 8 to March 12. All lectures and the field trip are required. This course introduces the geoscience toolkit using field-based measurements. Course material will apply concepts from sedimentology, stratigraphy, geomorphology, structural geology, plate tectonics, petrology, glacial geology to case studies in a particular region. Students will practice geomorphic and geologic mapping, describing rocks and sediments, and placing local observations in geologic context. Students will learn to apply geoscience principles in the field while gaining perspectives on societal issues including natural hazards, natural resources, and environmental sustainability. Transportation will be by passenger van and lodging will include camping and rustic cabins with access to restrooms, showers, and basic necessities. The instructors will work with students who have financial and accessibility concerns so that suitable resources and accommodations can be arranged. For Spring 2022, we will visit Upstate New York to focus on glacial and fluvial geomorphology and geology of Appalachians.
 EVSC 7559New Course in Environmental Science
 Geoscience in the Field
19855 001Lecture (2 Units)Closed20 / 20 (20 / 20)Ajay Limaye+1We 6:00pm - 7:50pmClark Hall 101
 Lectures occur on February 16, February 23, March 2, and March 16. The field trip dates are March 8 to March 12. All lectures and the field trip are required. This course introduces the geoscience toolkit using field-based measurements. Course material will apply concepts from sedimentology, stratigraphy, geomorphology, structural geology, plate tectonics, petrology, glacial geology to case studies in a particular region. Students will practice geomorphic and geologic mapping, describing rocks and sediments, and placing local observations in geologic context. Students will learn to apply geoscience principles in the field while gaining perspectives on societal issues including natural hazards, natural resources, and environmental sustainability. Transportation will be by passenger van and lodging will include camping and rustic cabins with access to restrooms, showers, and basic necessities. The instructors will work with students who have financial and accessibility concerns so that suitable resources and accommodations can be arranged. For Spring 2022, we will visit Upstate New York to focus on glacial and fluvial geomorphology and geology of Appalachians.
French
 FREN 3030Phonetics
11378 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 14 / 18Gladys SaundersTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 287
 FREN 3030 is an introductory course in French phonetics. It provides basic concepts in articulatory phonetics and phonological theory, and offers students techniques for improving their own pronunciation. The course will cover the physical characteristics of individual French sounds; the relationship between these sounds and their written representation (orthography); the rules governing the pronunciation of "standard French"; the most salient phonological features of selected French varieties; phonetic differences between French and English sounds; and to some extent, ‘la musique du français’, i.e., prosodic phenomena (le rythme, l’accent, l’intonation, la syllabation). Practical exercises in 'ear-training' (the perception of sounds) and 'phonetic transcription' (using IPA) are also essential components of this dynamic course. Pre-requisite: FREN 2020 (or equivalent). Course taught entirely in French; counts for major/minor credit in French and Linguistics TR 2:00 PM – 3:15 PM (Saunders)
 FREN 3031Finding Your Voice in French
 Picturing France
11801 004SEM (3 Units)Open 10 / 15Cheryl KruegerTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 115
 We will explore French culture and language every week through the discussion of 12 major works of art that have shaped the way we think about France and visual expression. ABOUT THE COURSE Finding your voice doesn't happen overnight. Not in the language(s) we have been speaking since we were children, and not in a foreign language. The main goals of this course are to guide you on this life-long journey, and to help you become aware of your own best practices for learning French. You will be encouraged to take reflective notes in class on the material with which you interact, and just as important, on your relationship to that material. Who are you when you read, speak, listen, and write in French? What are your strengths? How does improving your writing in French help you to better understand how you write in English? How does engaging with French influence your approach to other courses and to the world around you? Students in this course co-construct the reading syllabus, based on their own interests, by assigning and leading discussion of articles in French. They practice listening skills with our Chanson de la Semaine (Song of the Week) play list, and explore visual culture through our Portrait de la Semaine blog posts. Students practice both creative writing and more familiar genres (a film review, a persuasive essay) during in-class writing workshops and draft-writing. Integrated in all these activities, a semester-long grammar review guides students to better understand how form and meaning work together. COURSE OBJECTIVES to find your "voice" in written French to express yourself in writing in another language to experiment with writing genres and styles, including creative writing to think about how form and meaning work together, and how form can change, alter, skew, reinforce, refine the expression of ideas to practice editing and rewriting your own work to learn to use print and online resources to refine grammar and style to hone writing skills that will serve you in other courses (including courses taught in English) to learn to review and revise grammar independently to write with a sense of the reader in min to read a variety of short texts with grammar, style, and register in mind to read and discuss short articles in French selected by the students themselves, based on their interests WHAT YOU WILL DO expand your knowledge of grammar, vocabulary , and culture, though our Chanson de la semaine/Song of the Week playlist explore visual culture by contributing a short entry to our Tableau de la semaine/Portrait of the Week blog review basic French grammar and go into further depth on more advanced grammar; much of this will be done at home practice grammar with written exercises and an answer key (at home) integrate better grammar in writing develop a personal system for tracking the grammar you need to work on work in teams to compose drafts and to peer-review prepare to apply what you have learned to more advanced courses. discover the benefits of guided interactive note-taking in class share ideas and information in class and on a discussion board read short texts in class and at home discuss readings assigned by the teacher and by fellow students assign and lead the discussion of a reading of your choice from the internet, based on your interest
 FREN 3034Advanced Oral Expression in French
17924 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (2 / 199) 15 / 15Gladys SaundersTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmNew Cabell Hall 287
 FREN 3034 This advanced course in oral expression will allow students to learn and reflect on issues that are of concern to their French-speaking contemporaries. It provides an excellent opportunity for students to practice their French speaking skills in a variety of communicative contexts. Discussion topics will be determined largely by student interests but will likely include education, family life, the arts, immigration, Franco-American relations, health, sports and business culture. All class resources (including articles from French newspapers and magazines, journals, TV and radio) will be available online. Students will be graded on their engaged involvement in class discussions, their in-class presentations (individual and group), a final oral reflective exam and an audio and/or video class project or contribution to a class web-journal. FREN 3034 is the only course on offer to emphasize, exclusively, the skill of speaking French (spontaneously and fluently) Pre-requisite: FREN 3031 and either completion of FREN 3032 or concurrent enrollment in FREN 3032. This course is not intended for students who are native speakers of French or whose secondary education was in French schools. TR 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm (Saunders)
 Popular Music and Cultural Identities in Contemporary France
21174 002Lecture (3 Units)Open 10 / 15Deborah McGradyTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmTBA
 What constitutes a “chanson française?” This course will explore the complexities of this question by interrogating the roots and current trends of popular music in contemporary France with an emphasis on its urgent intersections with language, history, culture, politics, and identity. Class resources will include music videos, live recordings, reviews, interviews, podcasts, radio, television, film clips, and excerpts from online newspaper and magazine articles. Thematic units centered around themes of love and relationships, gender and the body, race and social justice, and composition and community will facilitate student-driven discussion. The aim of this course is to improve oral expression and thus assessment prioritizes speaking. In addition to active participation in class, graded assignments include exploratory homework, collaborative podcasts, two round-table discussions, and a midterm and final that involve group presentations.
 FREN 3037French for Global Development and Humanitarian Action
20676 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (3 / 199) 18 / 18Karen JamesMoWeFr 9:00am - 9:50amWilson Hall 238
 Designed for students seeking to develop advanced linguistic skills in oral and written French and cultural competence in preparation for careers related to global development and humanitarian action. Discussions and assignments revolve around case studies and simulated professional situations drawn from real-life global development and humanitarian aid initiatives, with a focus on francophone West African countries. Our cases and topics this semester will encompass community health, education, economic development, and advocacy for human rights and gender equity. Course prerequisite: FREN 3032 (Priority enrollment for French majors and minors from Nov. 1 to Nov. 15, 2021)
 FREN 3042The French-Speaking World II: Expansion
 Royalty and Revolution
17927 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 14 / 18Jennifer TsienMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 187
 During the Classical Era, Louis XIV built Versailles, France colonized Canada and the Caribbean, philosophers dared to challenge the Catholic Church, and in the end, the Revolution changed France forever. In view of this tumultuous historical background, this course will provide an overview of the writings of this era, from the canonical works of Corneille, Molière, Voltaire, and Diderot to lesser-known but significant works that grapple with issues of slavery, gender roles, atheism, and foreignness. We will examine how writers used wit, emotion, and logic to persuade readers to accept their controversial ideas. Pre-requisite: 3032
 FREN 3043The French-Speaking World III: Modernities
 Tradition et innovation: Comment (se) transformer à travers le temps, l'espace et la culture
17926 001SEM (3 Units)Open 16 / 18Claire LyuMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 191
 Ce cours vous invite à réfléchir sur les questions essentielles qui se trouvent au cœur de toute entreprise humaine qui tente de créer une œuvre artistique et/ou intellectuelle: comment faire surgir le nouveau de l'ancien, l'originalité de l'imitation, le singulier du conformisme? Ainsi, nous explorerons la relation entre la tradition et l'innovation à travers les écrivains, les artistes et les penseurs modernes qui ont façonné leurs œuvres en dialogue explicit avec le passé et la voix des autres. Que pouvons-nous apprendre, par exemple, de l'écrivain franco-chinois Cheng qui, élu à l'Académie française, écrit en un français qui est traversé par la langue et la pensée chinoises?; ou de la philosophe belge Despret qui reprend la thèse cartésienne du 17ème siècle sur la supériorité des hommes sur les animaux et la resitue dans le contexte éthique, féministe et écologique de nos jours?; ou du musicien belge-rwandais Stromae qui transpose en performance du 21ème siècle (vidéo/youtube et concert) la chanson de l'opéra de Bizet qui, à son tour, puise dans la nouvelle de Mérimée du 19ème siècle?
 FREN 3050History and Civilization of France: Middle Ages to Revolution
13627 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (2 / 199) 19 / 18Gary FergusonTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 283
 You love France and are intrigued by its long and rich history? This course offers you the opportunity to explore your interests and deepen your knowledge of the major events, political figures, and the artistic, cultural, and intellectual movements, prior to the Revolution, that have shaped France as we know it and whose legacy is seen and felt to this day. Setting the stage with a survey of prehistoric and Roman Gaul, we will focus on the thousand-year period known as the Middle Ages, followed by the Renaissance, the Classical Age, and the Enlightenment. Subjects will be discussed in terms of both their original historical context and their evolving significance – often contested – to later and present generations. Films, visual images, and primary documents will supplement readings from secondary historical texts. Assignments will include group projects, in-class presentations, written papers, and quizzes.
 FREN 3585Topics in Cultural Studies
 Insanity: Women and Mental Health in French Lit
11980 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (4 / 199) 18 / 18Elizabeth HallMoWeFr 1:00pm - 1:50pmWilson Hall 214
 Who determines conventions of sanity and what does it mean not to be “sane” or “insane”? How do we define our selves and how does society define us? What are the consequences of naming women as insane, hysterical, mad, or odd? How do writers and filmmakers portray conditions of women’s mental illness? This course examines French/Francophone women’s works of literature and film that depict various states of women's mental health, including anxiety and depression, and the repercussions of these crises. Driving questions will include how we define sanity and insanity and the effects of isolation, povery, and oppression on self and identity. We will focus on women's literature of the 20th century, including autobiographical narratives, fictions, and films. Authors and directors to be studied will include Marguerite Duras, Amélie Nothomb, Maryse Condé, Anna Gavalda, Leïla Slimani, Anne Hébert, Marie-Claire Blais, Agnès Vardas, Marjane Satrapi, and Claire Denis. Students will engage actively, keep a reflection journal, write a midterm and final critical essay, and collaborate on a multimedia cultural studies research project. Course conducted in French.
 FREN 4580Advanced Topics in Literature
 The Extreme Contemporary
17929 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (3 / 199)18 / 18Ari BlattTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmMonroe Hall 111
 The Extreme Contemporary, or What the French Are Reading Now This course is designed as a survey of contemporary French literature. One might even call it an introduction to what has come to be known as “extremely contemporary” French literature (l’extrême contemporain), which is to say books that have been published within the last few years (including one or two that were published in 2021). After an initial consideration of some of the major trends to have emerged on the French literary scene since the turn of the twenty-first century, students will read a selection of texts (fictions, non-fictions, and works that fall somewhere in between) that have been hailed by critics and readers alike. While the course focuses on what kinds of books the French are reading today, we will also consider how they read, how they talk about what they are reading, and how they inform themselves further about what to read next by consulting a number of essential and readily available resources for enthusiasts of contemporary French writing, like magazines, radio programs, podcasts, websites, blogs, book reviews, and television programs (indeed, the French have a long tradition of producing quality “book tv”). Works by writers such as Jean Rolin, Jean Echenoz, Maylis de Kerangal, Vincent Almendros, Gael Faye, Maria Pourchet, Adeline Dieudonné, Marie Darrieusecq, and Tanguy Viel may find their way onto the syllabus. With any luck, students will have a few opportunities to discuss their reading (over zoom) with the writers themselves. Requirements include regular reading and active participation in class discussion, an oral presentation on a particular aspect of the contemporary literary scene, a series of short commentaries and book reviews, and a final paper. Prerequisites: FREN 3032 and at least one other course above FREN 3040. Course conducted in French.
 FREN 5585Topics in Civilization / Cultural Studies
 Thinking France in the World
 Thinking France in the World
12549 001Lecture (3 Units)Open3 / 10 (10 / 30)Janet Horne+1Th 3:30pm - 6:00pmGibson Hall 242
 What does it mean to think about “France in the world”? Starting from the controversy around the 2017 L’Histoire mondiale de la France (France in the World: A New Global History), we will explore France’s global interactions from the medieval to the post-WW2 periods, how these interactions have shaped France and its interlocutors, and how scholars understand this history today. This course will be taught in English, with the option to read and write in French for those students who wish to do so. Open to advanced undergraduates by instructor permission. Offered simultaneously FREN/HIEU 5585 and 8585. Co-taught by Janet Horne (French) and Jennifer Sessions (History) The central goal of this interdisciplinary course is to explore what it means to think about “France in the world” as a framework for French history and culture. First, to understand how scholars have reconceptualized national histories “in the world” as being inherently and reciprocally global, imperial, and transnational, we will examine key theoretical and conceptual statements drawn from a range of fields. Second, we will examine the particular stakes--intellectual, cultural, and ideological--of this new approach for French studies through the controversy sparked by the publication of the 2017 volume L’Histoire mondiale de la France (France in the World: A New Global History). Finally, we hope to gain a deeper understanding of how France has been shaped by its global interactions and how we understand the enduring impact of those interactions today. Readings will cover a broad chronological span, focusing on works that place medieval, revolutionary, Third Republic, and postwar France in global, imperial, and transnational contexts. We will have the opportunity to discuss some of these texts with their authors, who will join our seminar in person or virtually. This seminar will allow graduate students in a variety of fields to develop their understanding of global methodologies, as well as of modern French history, and to think more deeply about how that history intersects with their own research and teaching agendas. It will offer preparation for teaching, research, and other endeavors in French history and culture, European studies, global history, and related fields. Since students will enter this course with varying backgrounds and interests, the seminar will adopt a collaborative learning model and give participants the flexibility to choose writing assignments tailored to their intellectual and professional goals. We will meet with each student early in the semester to discuss writing options and goals for the semester.
 FREN 7500Topics in Theory and Criticism
 All You Always Wanted to Know about Theory
 Literary Theory: Classic Thoughts, Modern Texts, Contemporary Debates
17928 001Lecture (3 Units)Open5 / 10Claire LyuMo 3:30pm - 6:00pmCocke Hall 101
 This course serves as an introduction to theoretical texts we encounter most frequently in the discourses of literary criticism. Our aim is to gain a deeper understanding of how literature has been thought and debated as well as how literary criticism has been practiced over time. In the first part of the course, we will read key texts of the critical tradition from antiquity to the early twentieth century. In the second part of the course, we will survey the major theoretical movements of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries such as formalism/ structuralism/ deconstruction, reader response theory, psychoanalysis, feminism/ gender studies/ queer theory, eco-criticism/ animal studies. (Due to time constraints, we will not cover post-colonial theory and its variations in the francophone context, given that several seminars in the department treat the subject.)
 FREN 8585Seminar in Cultural Studies
 Thinking France in the World
12550 001Lecture (3 Units)Open4 / 5 (10 / 30)Janet Horne+1Th 3:30pm - 6:00pmGibson Hall 242
 FREN 5585 and 8585 Thinking France in the World Spring 2022 What does it mean to think about “France in the world”? Starting from the controversy around the 2017 L’Histoire mondiale de la France (France in the World: A New Global History), we will explore France’s global interactions from the medieval to the post-WW2 periods, how these interactions have shaped France and its interlocutors, and how scholars understand this history today. Readings and discussions in English (French optional). • Offered simultaneously with HIEU 5585 and 8585 • This combined section course will be offered by Professors Janet Horne (French) and Jennifer Sessions (History) • This course will be taught in English, with the option to read and write in French for those students who wish to do so. Course Objectives The central goal of this interdisciplinary course is to explore what it means to think about “France in the world” as a framework for French history and culture. First, to understand how scholars have reconceptualized national histories “in the world” as being inherently and reciprocally global, imperial, and transnational, we will examine key theoretical and conceptual statements drawn from a range of fields. Second, we will examine the particular stakes--intellectual, cultural, and ideological--of this new approach for French studies through the controversy sparked by the publication of the 2017 volume L’Histoire mondiale de la France (France in the World: A New Global History). Finally, we hope to gain a deeper understanding of how France has been shaped by its global interactions and how we understand the enduring impact of those interactions today. Readings will cover a broad chronological span, focusing on works that place medieval, revolutionary, Third Republic, and postwar France in global, imperial, and transnational contexts. We will have the opportunity to discuss some of these texts with their authors, who will join our seminar in person or virtually. This seminar will allow graduate students in a variety of fields to develop their understanding of global methodologies, as well as of modern French history, and to think more deeply about how that history intersects with their own research and teaching agendas. It will offer preparation for teaching, research, and other endeavors in French history and culture, European studies, global history, and related fields. Open to advanced undergraduates by permission. Since students will enter this course with varying backgrounds and interests, the seminar will adopt a collaborative learning model and give participants the flexibility to choose writing assignments tailored to their intellectual and professional goals. We will meet with each student early in the semester to discuss writing options and goals for the semester.
French in Translation
 FRTR 3584Topics in French Cinema
 Masterpieces of French Cinema
12548 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (5 / 199) 20 / 20Ari BlattTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmMonroe Hall 111
 *NOTE THAT THIS COURSE WILL BE TAUGHT IN ENGLISH - IT IS OPEN TO ALL STUDENTS FROM ALL SCHOOLS ACROSS GROUNDS* *Also note that this course does NOT count toward the major or minor in French* An introduction to great works of French cinema, from the earliest short films of the Lumière Brothers and George Meliès, to feature-length works by Jean Vigo, Jean Renoir, Jean-Luc Godard, François Truffaut, Agnès Varda, Mathieu Kassovitz, Michael Haneke, Céline Sciamma and others. Students will study various film genres, movements, and trends (poetic realism, the new wave, cinema of the banlieue) in relation to larger social, cultural, and aesthetic contexts. They will also spend time paying close attention to film form. Required work includes a series of short papers and film reviews, a more substantial critical essay, regular contribution to group discussion, and the production, in small teams, of a short film inspired by one or more works on the syllabus. All films are in French with English subtitles. Course conducted entirely in English. No knowledge of French required.
Graduate Business
 GBUS 8619Leading Teams
19501 001Lecture (1.5 Units)Open0 / 73Gabrielle AdamsWeTh 10:00am - 11:25amDarden Classroom Bldg Room 150
 Why do some teams succeed and others fail? This class examines how groups can composed and structured for effectiveness and how group dynamics help or hinder team performance. This course will also give you an opportunity to learn about teamwork and leadership through first-hand experience in teams. In-class exercises will illustrate natural variations in human behavior, and will portray some of the challenges of leading teams. These exercises will provide a common context for discussing course concepts and gaining insights about your own and others’ behavior.
German
 GERM 3000Advanced German
 Identity and Belonging
11639 001SEM (3 Units)Open 14 / 18Kathryn SchroederTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 364
 Click on schedule number to the left for description.
 How do the languages we speak shape our identity? Where do we belong? What does it mean to be a speaker of German? In this content-based language course, we will investigate questions of language, identities and belonging. Among other topics, we’ll explore German as a pluricentric language and discuss what it means to feel “at home” in the German language, by reading texts from authors like the Japanese and German-language writer, Yoko Tawada and the Afro-German activist and poet, May Ayim, and others. Together, we will work on your communication skills in German and practice your speaking and writing. To help you communicate confidently in German, we will systematically review grammar topics at the upper intermediate level, selectively target grammar topics at the advanced level, and place special emphasis on questions of German sentence structure. Prerequisite GERM 2020 or GERM 2050 or instructor’s permission. If you haven’t taken GERM 2020 or GERM 2050, and are interested in taking this course, please email Kathryn Schroeder at kn3bt@virgina.edu!
 GERM 3010Texts and Interpretations
10193 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 7 / 18Paul DobrydenMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 107
 "Texts and Interpretations" is designed a) to introduce students to the practice of reading and interpreting texts, and b) to further students' overall German language proficiency in reading, writing, and speaking. Students will have the opportunity to familiarize themselves with different genres and media, as well as with the technical terms necessary to discuss and analyze them. Each module will focus on a theme. Students will engage in class discussions and group work, which will take the form of creative tasks such as short performances of a scene, recitations (Lesetheater), or transformations of a text into a different genre in order to explore the conditions of meaning-making. Guided reading and writing assignments will exercise students’ critical thinking skills. Active participation is required throughout the course. Work will be conducted in German, except for particular sessions devoted fully to writing.
 GERM 3110Literature in German II
 Literature of the 20th and 21st Century
19777 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 16 / 18Julia GuttermanTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmNew Cabell Hall 338
 For description, click on schedule number to the left.
 “Es war kein Traum,“ Franz Kafka’s narrator proclaims upon waking up as a giant insect. Ingeborg Bachmann asks whether dreams can be bought – and with what currency? Freud dreamt a different dream: that dreams, rightly understood, would let us glimpse the hidden objectives of human behavior. Before and after Freud, dreams, at once elusive and powerfully present, have puzzled and inspired generations of philosophers, psychologists, literary writers, and artists. In “Literature in German II,” we will explore the world of dreams in literatures written in the German language from the turn of the twentieth century to today. Following the motif of the dream in writers as diverse as Franz Kafka, Walter Benjamin, Gertrud Kolmar, Charlotte Beradt, Ingeborg Bachmann, and Hengameh Yaghoobifarah, will inquire how dreams shape our living experiences and how life shapes our dream lives. Sessions involve class discussions, group work, and readings. Active participation is required throughout the course, and all work will be conducted in German. Prerequisite GERM 3010 or instructor's permission.
 GERM 3559New Course in German
 German Phonetics and Pronunciation
19776 001Lecture (3 Units)Open16 / 18Christina NeuhausMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 485
 Click on schedule number to the left for description
 This course will deal with pronunciation from a linguistic perspective. This means that we won't just practise our pronunciation, but we'll also learn how sounds are even created in the first place. What happens in our mouth/throat when we pronounce a b or a ch? How is a German o different from an American o? How do we know which syllable in a word to stress and where does the typical German sound of sentences even come from ("why do Germans always sound so angry??"). Based on this, we'll also practise our own pronunciation, with a focus on individual improvement rather than some sort of absolute perfection. We'll also discuss whether "good" pronunciation is even necessary or important and how pronunciation is connected to identity, social class, regional origins, etc. We will also reflect on best practises for teaching pronunciation within a classroom or tutoring context. Prerequisite: German 2020 or instructor permission
 GERM 4600Fourth-Year Seminar
 Modernity and the German Jewish Writer
10194 001Lecture (3 Units)Open5 / 10Jeffrey GrossmanTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 042
 This course will explore the response of German(-speaking) Jewish writers to modern German and European culture and society. We will explore what questions arose for them about their place in German-speaking society, how society viewed them, and how they, for their part, intervened in the cultural landscape. The historian George Mosse has argued that “Bildung” (the ideal of ethical and cultural self-formation) was central to German Jewish culture. We will explore Mosse’s and other views on the question in connection with several major writers and thinkers. Readings of Kafka, Freud, Schnitzler, Else Lasker-Schüler, Joseph Roth, Egon Kisch, Gertrud Kolmar, Alfred Döblin, Stefan Zweig, and others. The seminar will be taught in German. The first two-thirds of the semester will be devoted to assigned readings, for a selection of which students will write short response papers. For the remainder of the semester, students will focus on a research project, which will conclude with a short presentation and 10-page paper, to be developed in stages. The course is open to any student who has completed GERM 3010 and can read German well. Students who know German well but have not taken GERM 3010 may, with instructor permission, also take the course.
German in Translation
 GETR 3559New Course in German in Translation
 Infectious: Contagion and Culture
19782 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 18 / 30 (18 / 30)Paul DobrydenMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 332
 Why is contagion so fascinating? From stories of plagues, vampires, and zombies to mobs, laughter, and memes, contagious phenomena can be found in cultural objects of all kinds--indeed, culture itself is often described as infectious, something that reproduces and spreads from person to person. Drawing on texts, images, and films from the late 19th century to the present, this course will use contagion as a lens for examining and troubling fundamental cultural distinctions, such as self/other, mind/body, society/nature, sacred/profane, original/copy, medium/message, and living/dead. We will ask not just how culture has tried to make sense of contagion, but how contagion has been used to make sense of culture as well.
Graduate Nursing
 GNUR 5230Ethical and Legal Issues in Health Care
17198 001SEM (3 Units)Open 28 / 30Ashley HurstTu 1:00pm - 4:00pmMcLeod Hall 1003
 This will be a 3 credit only course for Spring 2022- SIS is being updated.
  This seminar introduces students to the ethical and legal issues undergirding today's major healthcare issues. Students will engage US case law, ethical theories and public policy to grapple with the impact these issues have on current and future provision of health care. All majors and degree programs are welcome; no prerequisites and it will be taught as a 3 credit course only- SIS will be updated in November.
Global Studies-Global Studies
 GSGS 3100Critical Conceptions of the Global
18648 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 26 / 40Helena ZeweriTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amNew Cabell Hall 323
 Through analyzing and discussing journal articles, op-eds, podcasts, and carrying out your own multimedia project, you will see how global institutions like the UN and the World Bank shape the lives of everyday people across the world; how consumer practices in the US are linked to deforestation practices in Brazil; how US border control policies are linked to policing institutions in Europe and beyond. In doing so, you will begin to see how seemingly distant places, people, and events are interconnected. From pandemics, to climate change, to movements for racial justice and social change, we will examine how the global is all around us.
Global Studies-Security and Justice
 GSSJ 3579New Practicum in Global Security and Justice
 Refugee Resettlement
 Reimagining Refugee Resettlement Practicum
18680 001PRA (3 Units)Wait List (11 / 199)20 / 20Helena ZeweriTu 3:30pm - 6:00pmNew Cabell Hall 187
 This course is an opportunity for students to develop an experiential understanding of the process of resettlement that formerly displaced peoples experience. Through engaging with narratives of displacement and communicating with local and international practitioners (i.e. case workers, policy advocates, researchers, asylum case managers, and volunteers) who work in the refugee aid and resettlement space at the local, national, and global level, students will build their knowledge of the moral, ethical, and political considerations that characterize refugee resettlement work.
Global Studies-Environments and Sustainability
 GSVS 3559New Course in Global Environments and Sustainability
 Systems Thinking/Systems Model
18682 001Lecture (3 Units)Open4 / 20Spencer PhillipsTu 3:30pm - 6:00pmNew Cabell Hall 211
 Life, including ecosystems, social interactions, and policy interventions are complex, and while some simplification of reality to try to make sense of it all is necessary, simplistic thinking and modeling can lead to market, design, planning, and policy actions doomed to fail. In Systems Thinking/Systems Modeling, we will dive into the complexity to understand the dynamics inherent in various systems (predator-prey, demand-supply, investment-returns, education-equality). And, by using visually and quantitatively rich software tools, we will learn how to build models that help us do a better job in our thinking and in our design of solutions to societal challenges.
 GSVS 4559New Course in Global Environments & Sustainability
 Ecosystem Services: How Nature Benefits People
18692 001Lecture (3 Units)Open9 / 40Spencer PhillipsTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmNew Cabell Hall 323
 "Ecosystem services are the effects on human well-being of the flow of benefits from an ecosystem endpoint to a human endpoint at a given extent of space and time" (Johnson et al. 2010). Ecosystem Service Valuation (ESV) is rapidly becoming the “coin of the realm” for evaluating the costs and benefits of policy action (and inaction), of development activity, or of investments in infrastructure, of energy development, and or conservation measures and environmental improvement. In this course, students will learn how to trace the “causal chains” from such actions/inactions to various ecosystem, social, and economic outcomes and to measure and value those outcomes both qualitatively and quantitatively. Methods and techniques introduced will include GIS mapping (because ecosystem and human endpoints exist at particular places on the landscape), benefit value and function transfer, meta-analysis, and others.
History-European History
 HIEU 2102Modern Jewish History
Website  19789 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (9 / 199) 45 / 45James LoefflerMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmRouss Hall 403
 Jewish civilization is one of the oldest and most influential components of world religion and history. Yet the Jewish people never possessed a large empire and always constituted a tiny minority in numerical terms, even in ancient times. In the modern period, Jews experienced an equally dramatic fate, including two pivotal events at the epicenter of the twentieth century: the Holocaust and the emergence of the State of Israel. Today, even as Jews constitute the tiniest fraction of the world’s population -- less than the standard of error on the Chinese census, as the saying goes -- the West grapples with the perplexing phenomenon of surging antisemitism. In this course, we will seek explanations for this unique history through surveying the basic narrative of Jewish history from the sixteenth century to the present. We will focus on the political, social, religious, and cultural transformations of Jewish life and identity around the world. Major topics to be discussed include political emancipation and the Hebrew Enlightenment, Zionism and modern Jewish politics, antisemitism and the Holocaust, the divergent paths of American and European Jewries, and post-World War II relations between global Jewry and the State of Israel. We will also examine how Jewish history relates to modern European, American, and Middle Eastern history. This is an introductory course that assumes no prior knowledge of Judaism or Jewish history. We will read and critically analyze a variety of primary and secondary sources, including religious, political, and legal writings, artistic images and musical recordings, and scholarly studies. Our goal is to introduce you not only to the study of Jewish history, but also the related academic fields of Jewish Studies, European history, and world history. Equally importantly, we aim to provide you with a concrete sense of the methods and questions that professional historians use to engage the past. HIEU 2102 follows HIEU 2101, Jewish History I: The Ancient and Medieval Experience, though the two may be taken independently. For history majors, HIEU 2102 satisfies the post-1700 Europe (HIEU) requirement. The course also fills a core requirement for the Jewish Studies major.
 HIEU 3559New Course in European History
 Empires of Faith, Europe and the World, 700-1000
18977 100Lecture (3 Units)Open 19 / 60Paul Kershaw+1MoWe 12:00pm - 12:50pmGibson Hall 211
 Click on 18977 [at left] for a full description of the class, its structure, requirements, and coverage.
 Europe and the wider Mediterranean and western Eurasian world were home to multiple cultures, communities and polities in the period from c. 700 to 1000 CE. Some of these polities were ‘empires of faith’ in the fullest sense: the Carolingian and Ottonian empires in western Europe, Byzantium, the eastern Roman empire in the eastern Mediterranean, the Caliphate. Others, however, possessed distinctive forms of their own: the hydrarchies of Viking and Islamic raiders, the nomadic confederations of the Avars and Magyars, the oligarchic rule of effectively independent cities and trading centers such as Rome or Venice. This class explores their distinctive histories and the ways in which those histories were interconnected through warfare, multiple forms of cultural exchange, and an increasingly complex and dynamic set of interlinked economic and environmental systems as well as the ways they connected with a wider world: North Africa, Central Asia, the Arctic, and the North Atlantic. We’ll also look at the evidence for how these distinctive societies were impacted by common phenomena, including climatic changes, the so-called ‘Dark Ages Cold Period’ and the subsequent Medieval Climate Anomaly. Other subjects to be addressed are forms of historical writing; early medieval slavery; the ideals and realities of political power; gender and identity; belief; travel and trade; forms of warfare; technological change; the reception of antiquity, and changing scholarly approaches to this period. The course will blend the chronological with a strongly comparative thematic component, as we explore particular issues in cross-cultural perspective. New discoveries and new approaches will be prominent. Format: two lectures and one discussion section each week. Requirements include: regular attendance, active discussion participation, two essays. No exams.
 HIEU 4502Seminar in Post-1700 European History
 The Holocaust and Law
Website  18737 001SEM (4 Units)Permission 15 / 15James LoefflerMo 3:30pm - 6:00pmThe Rotunda Room 150
 This course explores the pursuit of justice before, during, and after the Holocaust. We will study global legal responses to the Nazi regime in the 1930s and 1940s and the impact of the Holocaust on international law from 1945 to the twenty-first century through the lens of pivotal trials and legal campaigns, including the 1945–1946 Nuremberg Trials in Germany; the 1961 Eichmann Trial in Israel; and the 2000 British trial of Holocaust denier David Irving. We will also examine the relationship between the Holocaust and post-1945 international human rights law and anti-atrocity law. Mindful of the postwar historical context, we will pose the question of whether these trials and others delivered justice—and to whom? In this vein, we will ask how the pursuit of legal justice after the Holocaust affects our understanding of law itself.
 HIEU 5585Advanced Topics in Modern European History
 Thinking France in the World
 Thinking France in the World
20169 001SEM (3 Units)Open10 / 30 (10 / 30)Janet Horne+1Th 3:30pm - 6:00pmGibson Hall 242
 Thinking France in the World What does it mean to think about “France in the world”? Starting from the controversy around the 2017 L’Histoire mondiale de la France (France in the World: A New Global History), we will explore France’s global interactions from the medieval to the post-WW2 periods, how these interactions have shaped France and its interlocutors, and how scholars understand this history today. This course will be taught in English, with the option to read and write in French for those students who wish to do so. Open to advanced undergraduates by instructor permission. Offered simultaneously FREN 5510/8510. Co-taught by Janet Horne (French) and Jennifer Sessions (History)
 HIEU 8585Advanced Topics in Modern European History
 Thinking France in the World
 Thinking France in the World
20170 001SEM (3 Units)Open10 / 30 (10 / 30)Janet Horne+1Th 3:30pm - 6:00pmGibson Hall 242
 What does it mean to think about “France in the world”? Starting from the controversy around the 2017 L’Histoire mondiale de la France (France in the World: A New Global History), we will explore France’s global interactions from the medieval to the post-WW2 periods, how these interactions have shaped France and its interlocutors, and how scholars understand this history today. This course will be taught in English, with the option to read and write in French for those students who wish to do so. Open to advanced undergraduates by instructor permission. Offered simultaneously FREN 5510/8510. Co-taught by Janet Horne (French) and Jennifer Sessions (History)
History-United States History
 HIUS 3501Introductory History Workshop
 Making History Public
 Making History Public
20463 001SEM (3 Units)Permission 3 / 15Brian BaloghWe 6:00pm - 8:30pmNau Hall 211
 “Making History Public” will examine where history comes from by looking closely at a variety of forms of U.S. history. After an introduction that provides an overview of historical sources, different approaches to history and the variety of audiences that consume history, we will turn to historical scholarship. Scholarship produced primarily by professors with Ph.Ds in history or related fields provides “basic research” and narratives for a variety of historical venues. We will then move from the scholarly realm to examine more popular non-fiction venues for history. The blockbuster book is one such form. Blockbuster films, (like Lincoln) is another. Two other important forms of nonfiction venues for history are the documentary film and memoirs, written by prominent figures. In the last section of the class we will examine history that is conveyed to audiences of millions through audio on radio and podcasts, and video on the web and television. Because the Civil War and the memory of that war has been sucha compelling topic for scholars and the public alike – just check out the history section of your favorite book store – we will focus on a variety of historical treatments of the Civil War and how it has been remembered, including the debate over Civil War monuments. As an introductory History Workshop (HIUS 3501) this class will focus on what it means to be a historian, introducing students to the diverse ways in which historians conceive of the past, interpret their sources, and write histories. The course will introduce students to the methods through which historians collect and interpret their evidence and help students develop skills of historical research and analysis that will encourage success in other history courses, particularly the major seminar.
 HIUS 4501Seminar in United States History
 Wives, Widows, and Witches
 Wives, Widows, and Witches: Women’s Lives in Early America
18854 002SEM (4 Units)Permission 12 / 12Emily SackettWe 2:00pm - 4:30pmNau Hall 142
 This course examines the varied experiences of women in early America as they navigated the social systems and gender norms that developed over the course of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. English colonization created new roles for women and new understandings of how gender would function in the “new world” for white, Black, and Indigenous women. In this course, we will study how these women experienced English colonization, beginning with the arrival of the first white women at Jamestown in the early seventeenth century and extending until the conclusion of the American Revolution. Students will engage with primary sources and secondary readings that illustrate the diversity of women’s experiences across different regions of early America. A substantial research paper based on primary and secondary sources is the expected outcome of this course.
Japanese in Translation
 JPTR 3559New Course in Japanese in Translation
 Experiences and Expressions Beyond Japan
18320 001SEM (3 Units)Open 19 / 20Anri YasudaWe 2:00pm - 4:30pmNew Cabell Hall 338
 Requirement Designation: SWNW Class Attributes: ASUD-CSW,ASUR-R21C2
 When do visitors become immigrants? What does it mean to claim a place as a ‘furusato’ (homeplace)? Works of modern and contemporary fiction, non-fiction, cinema, and visual art by and/or about individuals with ties to Japan, who spend all or part of their lives outside of Japan, will guide us in exploring such questions. The class aims to broadly consider issues like diaspora identities, the relationships between nationality and culture, and the rise of World Literature through the work of writers and artists with Japanese roots. All materials will be in English translation. No prerequisites.
Latin
 LATI 3559New Course in Latin
 Apuleius
18342 001Lecture (3 Units)Open7 / 15Inger Neeltje Irene KuinMoWeFr 12:00pm - 12:50pmCocke Hall 101
 Fulfills Second Writing Requirement.
 In this course we will read selections from Apuleius' Metamorphoses (The Golden Ass) and his Self-Defense on a Charge of Magic (Apologia) in Latin, and both works in English in their entirety. We will relate these texts to the author's social and cultural environment in Roman North Africa, and consider their importance for understanding the second century CE within the intellectual history of the Roman Empire. In particular we will explore the overlap between philosophy, literature, and religion/magic as different modes of inquiry. Careful translation of the Latin, with attention for Apuleius' prose style, will be stressed, including grammar review. The course may be used to satisfy the Second Writing Requirement.
Linguistics
 LING 3559New Course in Linguistics
 Tunica Language Structures & Revitalization
19638 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 3 / 30Nathan WendteTu 5:00pm - 7:30pmNew Cabell Hall 389
 This course introduces students to Tunica (Luhchi Yoroni), an Indigenous language isolate of the Lower Mississippi Valley. Students will study the history of the Tunica people, the unique features of their reawakening ancestral language, and also consider the enterprise of linguistic and cultural revitalization in the context of this specific case study. Fulfills the Structure requirement for the Linguistics Program.
Leadership and Public Policy - Evaluation and Analysis
 LPPA 7120Economics of Social Insurance and Welfare Programs
20278 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (7 / 199)20 / 20Adam LeiveTh 9:00am - 11:30amContact Department
 Why is health insurance reform so difficult? Should safety net programs have work requirements? This seminar studies social insurance and welfare programs from an economist's perspective. Topics include health insurance, unemployment, Social Security, food stamps and other programs. Will use mix of theory and econometric analysis to examine current policy debates in the United States.
Leadership and Public Policy - Policy
 LPPP 3500Special Topics in Social Entrepreneurship
 Corporate Social Responsibilty
 Wicked Business: What Works to Combat Exploitation
20073 001Lecture (3 Units)Open10 / 30Kathryn BabineauTu 3:30pm - 6:00pmMemorial Gymnasium 211
 We live in a world where business is simultaneously the answer to our society’s problems, and the cause of them. Where Uber made transportation cheaper and safer by providing drivers ‘side hustles’, and also exploited those drivers by offering low-wage contract employment with no benefits. Where Amazon helps us to maintain connection through a pandemic with contact-free deliveries, and has been accused of suppressing unionization among its factory workers. What is to be done about this contradiction? Is wickedness the destiny of all business in global capitalism? Or, can smart policy solutions rein in the impulse to profit from exploitation? This class will give you a framework to consider these questions, and to think about how to answer them. Together, we will study some of the most intractable problems created by business, as well as innovative solutions that organizations around the world are using to tackle them. To do so, we will often engage directly with policymakers and leading academics, giving you hands-on experience and insight. By the end, you will be able to assess the contradictions of the business world, and come away with a new set of policy ideas to help resolve them.
 LPPP 5540Applied Policy Clinics
 Advocacy and Lobbying Clinic
16978 001WKS (2 Units)Open5 / 10Brooke LehmannFr 2:00pm - 4:30pmNew Cabell Hall 068
 The Spring should bring some very interesting opportunities to flex your advocacy muscles! Looking forward to an exciting time! Utilizing the instructor’s current clients, students in this clinic will have the opportunity to work on current social policy priorities of both this Congress and Administration. For this particular clinic, the focus of our work will be in the area of health care policy and child welfare policy and how current pieces of federal legislation will have on the well-being of populations who are served by these policy constructs. Over the 10-week clinic, students will be integrated into real-time research and analysis of current relevant policies and become familiar with advocacy activities related and to any Congressional reform efforts that are underway. Students will be producing work product to support particular advocacy events including research documents, informative one-pagers for congressional staff, and any other tools required for effective advocacy. To every extent possible, students will have the opportunity watch hearings/debates and other related congressional events, as well as propose policy solutions directly to the participating
 Utilizing the instructor’s current clients, students in this clinic will have the opportunity to work on current social policy priorities of both this Congress and Administration. For this particular clinic, the focus of our work will be in the area of health care policy and child welfare policy and how current pieces of federal legislation will have on the well-being of populations who are served by these policy constructs. Over the 10-week clinic, students will be integrated into real-time research and analysis of current relevant policies and become familiar with advocacy activities related and to any Congressional reform efforts that are underway. Students will be producing work product to support particular advocacy events including research documents, informative one-pagers for congressional staff, and any other tools required for effective advocacy. To every extent possible, students will have the opportunity watch hearings/debates and other related congressional events, as well as propose policy solutions directly to the participating client.
 LPPP 5559New Course in Public Policy and Leadership
 Data Ethics and Practice
20812 001Lecture (3 Units)Open13 / 20Michele ClaibournWe 2:00pm - 4:30pmThe Rotunda Room 152
 Our Spring 2021 partner is the UVA Legal Data Lab who is working to launch a database of Virginia court records. We will undertake some initial analysis of subsets of this data to create a series of policy-oriented data stories to accompany the database platform. These will serve as examples of the types of research the court data enables, provide models of reproducible analysis, and be an educational resource for others wishing to use the data platform for analysis and advocacy. We are particularly interested in developing analyses that will help justice-oriented organizations and advocates understand how his data can be used to understand racial and other disparities in the criminal and civil judicial systems.
 This applied course provides exposure to data science within a framework of data ethics in service of equity-oriented public policy. We will use administrative (and other) data to answer pressing questions about policy outcomes with attention to the moral and ethical implications of our work. This includes (1) finding, cleaning, and understanding data, (2) exploring, analyzing, modeling data, and (3) visualizing, contextualizing, and communicating data-informed policy recommendations, with care and respect for the affected partners and communities throughout. We will be using the open-source R environment for our work. You don’t need to be an expert in statistics or R or visualization or coding, but do need to be interested in learning. The projects will provide opportunities to develop these skills further.
Mathematics
 MATH 8720Differential Geometry
13291 001Lecture (3 Units)Open5 / 12Filippo MazzoliMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 064
 The main prerequisite for this class is the Differential Topology course (MATH 7820). A possible textbook (at least for the first part of the course) is Riemannian Geometry by Gallot, Hulin, Lafontaine. Other useful references are Riemannian Geometry by Petersen, and Riemannian Geometry by do Carmo. For the characteristic classes section, we will probably follow Geometry of Differential Forms by Morita.
Media Studies
 MDST 3508Advanced Topics in Media Practice
 News Documentary Production
17773 001SEM (3 Units)Permission 4 / 20Wyatt AndrewsMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmDell 2 103
 News Documentary Production is a class for experienced reporting students who'd like to go deeper, get more creative and actually have fun with long form video reporting, storytelling and editing. Working in teams, you will report, shoot and produce one long form 30 minute documentary, plus one individual 2:30 story related to that doc. **This is a class only for student reporters who have previous experience covering stories (in other classes or extracurricular reporting) and who are proficient with video shooting, sound and Adobe Premiere editing.
 MDST 3510Topics in Media Research
 Race and Digital Media Studies
17764 003SEM (3 Units)Open 28 / 30Pallavi RaoTu 4:00pm - 6:30pmWilson Hall 238
 What does racial capitalism have to do with technology and internet culture? Do surveillance technologies, AI, and algorithms perpetuate or create new forms of racism, racial exclusion, and anti-Black violence? Is Silicon Valley a racial capitalist project? This course explores these questions and the myriad ways in which race has shaped aspects of our digital world—from the infrastructures and tech policies, to algorithms and the collection of data, to the interfaces that shape engagement, and to the communities of color who resist the status quo, expand the digital public sphere, and express their creativity, joy, and desire in new complex ways.  
 MDST 3903Media and Protest: The 1960s
17769 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (8 / 199) 30 / 30Aniko BodroghkozyTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmMonroe Hall 111
 Civil rights marches. Black Power. Anti-Vietnam war mobilizations. Campus-based student uprising. Countercultural youth rebellion. Women’s liberation. Revolutionary urban guerrillas. It all coalesced into the catch-all term “the Movement.” The 1960s in the United States has been defined as an era of protest and turbulent transformation. The social, cultural, and political waves of that era continue to ripple through the American body politic and its cultural imagination. To paraphrase William Faulkner, the era of the 1960s isn’t dead, it isn’t even past. In our contemporary moment: Black Lives Matter. Antifa. Women’s March. Sunrise. The new catch-all term for this period of renewed protest and activism is “the Resistance.” This course will explore the protest movements of the 1960s through the lens of media coverage both in the mainstream press of the day – newspapers, general interest newsmagazines, photojournalism, television, popular culture, as well as the Movement’s own burgeoning underground press. We do so not only to understand an endlessly fascinating and often misunderstood moment in American history but also, crucially, to investigate what that period of protest can tell us about our current moment of protest and activism. Since the 2011 Occupy movement against income inequality and more recently the Black Lives Matter movement; the protests against Trumpism, white supremacy, and the emergence of the so-called “alt-right;” the rise of “Fourth Wave” feminism; youth-based uprisings around gun control and climate action, and we are in a period of dissent, demonstrations, and mass movement unseen since the 1960s. The year 2020 has been likened to the tumultuous 1968. Contemporary protest movements, mass mobilizations, and confrontations are garnering media attention similarly unseen since the media pre-occupation with the activism of the 1960s. Are there useful lessons we can learn? Are there legacies we can trace? Are there ways in which our contemporary moment and its media environment are fundamentally different? To what extent can “making sense of the Sixties” help us make sense of our similarly turbulent era? This discussion-heavy course will adopt a bit of a workshop approach. The instructor, an expert on the social movements of the 1960s and the era’s media landscape, will bring that expertise to the classroom. Students will be responsible for bringing research, questions, information, artifacts, and ideas about the contemporary media environment and current protest movements and activism to classroom discussion. This will be an active, two-way, and participatory endeavour.
 MDST 4960Advanced Independent Projects in Media Studies
 Athletes and Mental Health
13997 002IND (3 Units)Permission1 / 4Wyatt AndrewsTu 5:00pm - 7:30pmContact Department
 This is a documentary class that will research and produce a 30 minute video documentary on Athlete's Mental Health, with a focus on professional and college athletes. It won't necessarily focus on UVa athletes but that's possible. We anticipate highlighting cases to include Simone Biles and several NHL and NFL players, and expect some technical help from producers at NFL Films, where one of our students is an intern. The course is seeking students with strong interviewing skills or with technical video production experience.
Music
 MUSI 2090Sound Studies: The Art and Experience of Listening
 The Art and Experience of Listening
Website  13320 100SEM (3 Units)Open 9 / 15Noel LobleyMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmContact Department
 Please note: this course is an introduction to Sound Studies, there is no pre-requisite or co-requisite, and students from all backgrounds, levels and experiences are welcome to come and explore myriad ways to engage with sound.
 MUSI 2090 Sound Studies: The Art and Experience of Listening When we think about knowing the world through the senses, we are likely to think first of the visible world. But sound, hearing and listening are crucial too and often take precedence in many communities. Recently scholars in history, anthropology, geography, literary studies, acoustics, music, ecology, environmental science, and art have come together in the field of Sound Studies, reflecting on the role of sounds as forces that flow in and beyond human life. How do sound art, technology, and design create the world we inhabit and our everyday social and political experience? How can vibrations both heal and destroy? What does it mean to experience immersive and embodied sound? We will ponder these and other questions, moving between theoretical, experiential, and creative explorations. A short(5m 46s) prototype composition showcasing some ideas and student work from a previous version of the class can be accessed via the Website URL. No prior musical experience is required. Please do not hesitate to contact noel.lobley@virginia.edu
 MUSI 2559New Course in Music
 Creative Discovery
20407 002Lecture (2 Units)Open2 / 20Elliott TackittTuTh 1:00pm - 1:50pmContact Department
 This course focuses on creative recovery and discovery, expanding expressive potential through movement with focus on awareness, availability, balancing, and being in flow, and exploring techniques that may improve learning experiences. Julia Cameron’s The Artist’s Way provides a weekly topic on which students focus their self-reflection and in-class discussion. Jerald Schweibert’s Physical Expression and the Performing Artist provides a framework for expression and movement from an artist’s perspective, which may help students discover new performance potential as an artist. Csikszentmihalyi’s Flow theory will be considered alongside additional readings.
 MUSI 3010Studies in Early Modern Music (1500-1700)
 Sonic Encounters/Listening to the Past
19074 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 18 / 25Bonnie GordonTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmOld Cabell Hall 107
 When Christopher Columbus arrived in modern day Trinidad in 1498, he attempted to communicate with indigenous people using tambourines. He thought this would be enticing. It didn’t work. “On observing the music and dancing, however, they dropped their oars, and picked up their bows, and strung them. Each one seized his shield, and they began to shoot arrows at us.” This class uses sound to explore unexpected encounters in the premodern world. Course materials focus on a selection of exemplary pieces, listening to composition, improvisation, text-music relations, the representation of dramatic stories, the expression of religious ideas, and performance. This is a class about how to do history, how to listen, and how to imagine the sonic past. What was it like to listen to music in a world before car alarms and amplified sound? What were the technological equivalents of headphones and MP3s? Geographically, the class centers on Western Europe and Jamestown, Virginia. It takes a global perspective and explores the role of sound in the deep histories of white supremacy in forming the bricks and mortar of music performance and scholarship in the United States. Chronologically, we will pivot around the turn of the seventeenth centaury, a moment of overwhelming uncertainty, fantastic creative energy, and sometimes violent debates about truth. Course work will include reading, writing, listening, visits to special collections, and reflection. The course is taught at the music major level. Majors and non-majors are welcome. There are no prerequisites, and knowledge of Western music notation is not required.
 MUSI 3030Studies in Nineteenth-Century Music
13341 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 16 / 25Elizabeth OzmentMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmOld Cabell Hall B012
 How does one define 19thCE music? Can you imagine attending the premiere of a Beethoven symphony or Rossini opera? Why were so many people taking piano lessons? How did music intensify feelings of community and difference? What is the purpose of music? In this seminar, we will begin to answer the above questions by overviewing the creative, cultural, social, intellectual, musical history of Europe during the long nineteenth century, the period in-between the French Revolution and the outbreak of the First World War. This era saw the dissolution of previous ways of understanding the world and the development of new ideologies and artistic movements. Nineteenth-century music intersected with the rise of historicism, nationalism, romanticism, liberalism, socialism, feminism, industrialization, and secularization; reflecting and informing European experiences and worldviews. In this seminar we will strengthen our critical listening skills, place compositions in historical context, and relate these sounds to broader cultural trends. Our study of historical documents will highlight some common themes that distinguish this period of European music from eighteenth- and twentieth-century trends. We will also acknowledge that this music frequently articulated contradictory aesthetics, thereby illuminating period struggles over the purpose and value of artistic expression. There is no prerequisite for this class.
 MUSI 3510Music and Community Engagement
 Amplified Justice Part 2
  Amplified Justice
20187 001SEM (3 Units)Permission8 / 15Bonnie Gordon+1TuTh 9:30am - 10:45amNew Cabell Hall 042
 This is the continuation of Amplified Justice. The year long class engages topics such as music as a form of evidence in legal cases, audio live streaming of Supreme Court hearings, the use of audio technology in the courtroom, and voice, race, and gender in the criminal justice system. Students will have the opportunity to work with legal and social justice practitioners in Charlottesville and to visit courtrooms and other public spaces to reflect on the role of sound in our political and legal processes. Course materials will include music, film, novels, and academic articles. Students will also have the opportunity to produce creative work based on their observations around sound and justice.
 MUSI 4523Issues in Ethnomusicology
 African Electronic Music
 Electronic Music in Africa
Website  12200 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 11 / 15Noel Lobley+4MoWe 9:30am - 10:45amContact Department
 In 2018, the renowned British music journal Fact boldly claimed that “the world’s best electronic music festival is in Uganda.” Indeed, African cities have long been places for some of the most futuristic music, sounds that reverberate between local identities and international avant-garde scenes. Explosive, hypnotic and ultra-modern electronic sounds meld stunning dance forms with musical theatre and fashion, articulating the urban youth experience in cities as diverse and vibrant as Johannesburg, Nairobi, Kinshasa, Lagos, Dar es Salaam, and Kampala. In this course, we will engage multiplex genres of electronic music from the African continent, including Congolese congotronics, Ugandan acholitronix, Tanzanian singeli, and South African shangaan electro and gqom apocalyptic bass music, paying close attention to innovations in artistic practice, remix culture and Afrofuturism. Blending critical and contextual work with exciting opportunities for real world outputs, we will be engaging with professional artists from different electronic scenes, such as the boiling Nyege Nyege collective and The Black Power Station, alongside other professional partners in music production, radio and written journalism, as well as exhibition and museum curation. As a way to open professional avenues for students, coursework will be driven towards the organization of an end of the semester multi-modal event representing in Charlottesville the electronic music bursting from the African continent. Building on each other’s interests and skills, students will all be working to imagine, design and curate this event. No prior musical experience is required.
 MUSI 4559New Course in Music
 Photosonic Composition
 Making Interactive Art with Light and Sound
19261 001Lecture (3 Units)Open4 / 12Alexander ChristieMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmContact Department
 Photosonic Composition examines the theory, history, and practice of creating interactive music and intermedia art through the use of light and sound. Students develop creative practice (building photosonic instruments and composing new pieces), study theory (engaging with a repertoire of compositions and investigating human-technology interactions), and learn technological skills (basic coding in Arduino and Max, basic analog circuit design, and building instrument enclosures in a maker space). Some experience with the Max programming environment will be helpful, but is not required. This class focuses on creative projects and culminates in the performance/presentation of students’ original photosonic compositions. No prerequisites or specific experience required. We will meet Monday/Wednesday from 2:00-3:15 in the Wilson Make Studio. Contact Alex Christie with any questions: acc3xp@virginia.edu
Physics
 PHYS 1559New Course in Physics
 Intro Python for Scientists and Engineers
Syllabus  20069 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 21 / 30Robert GroupMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmPhysics Bldg 210
 Along with an introduction to the PYTHON programming language, the course will introduce three core skills: analyzing data, simulating data, and visualizing data. It assumes no prior programming experience or knowledge about the inner workings of computers. It will concentrate on applications to common problems in science and engineering.
 PHYS 1660Practical Computing for the Physical Sciences
Website  19838 001Lecture (1 Units)Open 11 / 30Bryan WrightTu 2:00pm - 2:50pmPhysics Bldg 218
 This course, PHYS 1660, will give you a kit of skills and tools that will help you do great things even if you're not a mathematical prodigy. All you need is a little computing expertise. This course is designed for novice programmers: no programming experience is required! We'll teach you all the basic skills you need. The course uses the free online textbook here: https://tinyurl.com/practical-c
 PHYS 3559New Course in Physics
 Mathematics for Physics
Syllabus  20089 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (2 / 199) 30 / 30Cass SackettTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmPhysics Bldg 218
 This Topic covers linear algebra and complex analysis, with a review of vector calculus. Emphasis is on applications in physics. Prerequisite: MATH 2310 or MATH 2315 or APMA 2120. *Students that have received credit for MATH 4210 may not receive graded credit*
Politics-American Politics
 PLAP 3370Workshop in Contemporary American Electoral Politics
Website  13775 001SEM (3 Units)Permission 15 / 15Kenneth Stroupe+1Th 2:00pm - 4:30pmNew Cabell Hall 209
 Application required. Scroll to (near bottom of page) to download PLAP 3370 application: https://centerforpolitics.org/student-internship/
 The purpose of this course is to provide students with a broad understanding of the fundamental principles of modern American politics as well as a view of other democracies around the world through periodic seminars as well as a semester-long virtual internship with the University of Virginia Center for Politics (The Center). The Center is a nonpartisan, interdisciplinary unit of the University of Virginia dedicated to increasing civic knowledge and participation. By combining seminars and topical reading/writing assignments with event participation and work experience, students will become familiar with important fundamentals of state and national politics, and how the Center for Politics develops educational programs for the general public aimed at fostering civic knowledge and engagement. In addition to class meetings and assignments, the course has an internship requirement (minimum of four hours per week) with the Center and/or participating in Center-sponsored events.
 PLAP 7500Special Topics in American Politics
 Political Psychology
13510 001SEM (3 Units)Open2 / 15Nicholas WinterTh 2:00pm - 4:30pmGibson Hall 296
 Testing!
Politics-Comparative Politics
 PLCP 4500Special Topics in Comparative Politics
 Power, Violence and Inequality in the Global South
Website  12308 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (15 / 199) 15 / 15Denise WalshTh 4:30pm - 7:00pmNau Hall 142
 This course examines how power, violence and inequality function in the global South. The global South as used here refers not to a geographic location but to those groups and peoples around the world who have been negatively affected by global processes such as state-building, colonialism, and migration. The course thus aims to transcend the boundaries of comparative politics, which focuses on the nation state and elites, by examining global phenomena from the point of view of the marginalized, wherever they may be located. This is a critical orientation to the field and to politics more broadly, which means that the course draws upon a multidisciplinary array of readings that are ambitious, theoretically and empirically rich, and politically provocative. Course readings span the globe and include squatters in Calcutta, the Algonquin tribe in Canada, Palestinians, and survivors of sexual violence in Uganda.
Politics-International Relations
 PLIR 3500Special Topics in International Relations
 Foreign Policy Mistakes
17915 002Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (29 / 199) 30 / 30Joshua AlleyWe 7:00pm - 9:30pmGibson Hall 141
 Why do intelligent, experienced and well-intentioned leaders sometimes make significant foreign policy mistakes? For example, why did U.S. policymakers intervene in Vietnam, leaving three million dead? In hindsight, the Vietnam intervention seemed doomed to fail, but multiple leaders persisted in prosecuting the war. Why do policymakers implement and continue foreign policy initiatives, even when in hindsight failure seems inevitable? In this course, we will explore some well-known foreign policy mistakes in hopes of answering these questions. We will take deep dives into the Vietnam War, the Soviet-Afghan War, and the 2003 Iraq War. We’ll wrestle with why and how leaders made decisions by drawing on historical accounts and social science theory. Furthermore, we will consider the human costs of these decisions and weigh competing perspectives on their merits. Perhaps you are interested in politics and foreign policy. Maybe you want to work in policy one day. Whether you are observing or contributing to the policy process, this course will help you understand the sources and consequences of major policy mistakes. It will also give you motivation and tools to participate in policy debates.
Psychology
 PSYC 4500Special Topics in Psychology
 Controversies in Psychological Diagnosis
18998 002SEM (3 Units)Wait List (6 / 199) 25 / 25Alida DavisTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmAstronomy Bldg 265
 Why haven’t we developed medical tests for psychopathology? Is it ethical for a psychologist to diagnose a person they’ve never met (e.g., a politician)? What are the pros and cons of gender dysphoria being considered a psychological disorder? These are a just few of the questions we will be considering this semester. Students who take this course will come away with a knowledge of current and proposed diagnostic criteria for a variety psychological disorders; familiarity with key debates in the fields of clinical research and diagnosis; and increased confidence in interpreting and critiquing research articles. Students will also be supported in learning to translate their knowledge and opinions into APA-style papers.
Religion-Buddhism
 RELB 2559New Course in Buddhism
 Introduction to Buddhist Philosophy
 Introduction to Buddhist Philosophy (will become RELB2200)
19036 100Lecture (3 Units)Open 67 / 120Sonam KachruTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amWilson Hall 301
 Currently, the course is listed as offering between 1-4 credits. This is a mistake. It is a 3 credit class (consisting in lectures + discussions). We are trying to fix the error.
 Buddhism offers more than therapeutic exercises. A source of concepts, arguments and analyses, it has contributed to a history of thought through debates largely overlooked in Eurocentric histories of philosophy. This course is a corrective, inviting students to think about self, mind, consciousness, gender, race, identity, truth, love, logic, objects and more, with Buddhist philosophers of the past and present, in Asia and beyond.
Religion-General Religion
 RELG 4810Poetry and Theology
18962 001SEM (3 Units)Open 18 / 25 (18 / 25)Kevin HartTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amAstronomy Bldg 265
 This seminar focuses on the writings of two important modern poets, Gerard Manley Hopkins and Geoffrey Hill. The one is Catholic, and the other questions religion at every level while also remaining open to the possibility of faith. Each poet raises major theological issues: belief, doubt, ecstasy, martyrdom, revelation, transcendence, and theodicy, among them. We will read, as closely as possible, some poems and prose writings by each poet, consider their theological contexts, and examine the ways in which theological issues are folded in their poems. Students will write two essays, one on each poet.
Sociology
 SOC 3559New Course in Sociology
 Ethnography
17961 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 29 / 35Ian MullinsTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmNew Cabell Hall 232
 Ethnographic research is foundational to sociology. The term “ethnography” refers to methods through which scholars directly observe people as they engage in social action. Students in this course will both learn the principles of ethnography and conduct their own ethnographic research project
 SOC 4540Topics in Politics and Society
 Abolition Movements in the US
18594 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (9 / 199) 23 / 20Ian MullinsTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmNew Cabell Hall 032
 Abolition movements have gained significant public attention in the United States through the mobilization of Black Lives Matters protests and media coverage of demands to abolish the police and prisons. Yet recent discussions of abolition often neglect to consider the significance abolition movements have had throughout US history. Student in this course will study abolition movements past and present to better understand: (1) how the earlier abolition movement to end slavery relates to the contemporary movements to end mass incarceration; and (2) how these movements’ pursuits of particular forms of “abolition democracy” have changed (or could change) political institutions in the United States.
 SOC 4850Media, Culture and Society
13147 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (5 / 199) 20 / 20Ian MullinsTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amNew Cabell Hall 209
 The 2016 and 2020 U.S. Presidential Elections have raised urgent questions about the role knowledge plays in conservative politics. Scholars are turning their attention to the proliferation of “fake news” on the internet and what might be a new era of post-truth politics in the United States. This course investigates the lineage of conservative politics that is instrumental to the present state of U.S. politics. Students will learn about the history of the conservative movement and the Republican Party, as well as sociological approaches that will help them better understand the role of truth and knowledge in conservative politics today.
Swahili
 SWAH 1020Introductory Swahili II
12354 001Lecture (3 Units)Open6 / 10Asmaha HeddiMoWeFr 10:00am - 10:50amWeb-Based Course
 Swahili Introductory 2 is a continuation of the introduction to the basic components of Standard Swahili that you learned in the Fall semester. The course is specifically designed to help students who have some knowledge of Swahili and will build on your previous knowledge of Swahili to advance your ability to carry out basic conversations in Swahili about yourself, your world, friends, and East Africa. Whereas the course has a special place for structural aspects of the language, the emphasis is mainly placed on the following language skills: culture, listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
 Swahili Introductory 2
11901 002Lecture (3 Units)Open12 / 16Anne RotichMoWeFr 11:00am - 11:50amNew Cabell Hall 594
 This course is designed to advance your knowledge of Swahili from the SWAH 1010. It is expected that you will build your Swahili lexicon and Swahili grammar to enable you to adequately contribute to basic conversations with Swahili speakers in in the area. You will be able to talk more deeply about your work, studies, country and your preferences, needs, and interests following the correct grammar rules.
 SWAH 2020Intermediate Swahili II
12117 001SEM (3 Units)Open 8 / 16Anne RotichMoWeFr 12:00pm - 12:50pmNew Cabell Hall 594
 This intermediate Swahili course is intended to equip you with more language skills in speaking, reading, writing, listening and cultures. It is an opportunity for you to enhance your language skill gained from SWAH 2010. At the end of this course you will have increased your Swahili vocabulary, speak Swahili with more ease and less errors, understand and interact with Swahili speakers. You will be able to write and analyze texts and essays in Swahili on different topics and increase your appreciation of the cultures of the Swahili people.
Systems & Information Engineering
 SYS 4582Selected Topics in Systems Engineering
 Production and Inventory Control
20777 002Lecture (3 Units)Open2 / 15 (5 / 25)Robert RiggsFr 9:00am - 11:30amTBA
 This course covers basic and advanced models and techniques for managing inventory systems and for planning production. Topics include deterministic and probabilistic inventory models; production planning and scheduling; and introduction to Lean and factory physics.
 SYS 6582Selected Topics in Systems Engineering
 Production and Inventory Control
20778 002Lecture (3 Units)Open3 / 10 (5 / 25)Robert RiggsFr 9:00am - 11:30amTBA
 This course covers basic and advanced models and techniques for managing inventory systems and for planning production. Topics include deterministic and probabilistic inventory models; production planning and scheduling; and introduction to Lean and factory physics.
 Production and Inventory Control
20779 601Lecture (3 Units)Open0 / 10Robert RiggsTBATBA
 This course covers basic and advanced models and techniques for managing inventory systems and for planning production. Topics include deterministic and probabilistic inventory models; production planning and scheduling; and introduction to Lean and factory physics.
University Seminar
 USEM 1580University Seminar
 Flights of Fancy: A Media History of Birds
19740 003SEM (2 Units)Open 8 / 18Samhita SunyaFr 2:00pm - 3:50pmThe Rotunda Room 152
 Cats have come to rule the internet, and dogs are unlikely to relinquish their reputation as “man’s best friend.” But is there any creature that has intrigued humans more intensely than birds? Birds have been long connected to the otherworldly – the long-gone epoch of the dinosaurs, the mysteries of the soul, the vastness of the skies, the melodies of love. At the same time, they have been intertwined with what we easily take for granted as rather mundane: eggs for breakfast, chicken for dinner, pigeons everywhere! Through readings, field trips, hands-on activities, and guest speakers, this seminar engages humans' longstanding fascinations and interactions with birds. We will consider poetry, (audio)visual forms, design, and technology across time periods and cultures, towards a media history of birds: as representational motifs; as communication devices; as objects of colonial classification and collection; as models for aviation design; as barometers and co-inhabitants of our past and present environments; and more!
 Around Grounds: Art, Arch, & History at UVA
20478 004SEM (2 Units)Open 13 / 18Dylan RogersMoWe 10:00am - 10:50amFayerweather Hall 215
 This University Seminar explores the histories of UVA, from its Monacan origins, the labor of enslaved people, its art and architecture, to issues impacting the local community today. We will use buildings, objects, archives, and people to tell stories that have been forgotten—or never told in the first place. Class meetings will include in-class discussion paired with visits around Grounds and Charlottesville, to engage more fully with topics on-site.