UVa Class Schedules (Unofficial, Lou's List v2.10)   New Features
Schedule of Classes with Additional Descriptions - Spring 2023
These data were not obtained from SIS in real time and may be slightly out of date. MouseOver the enrollment to see Last Update Time
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Lou's List has been a hobby of mine since 2009, intended to support the educational experiences of students and instructors. It's been a satisfying endeavor, but I will be retiring at the end of this Fall semester. -- Lou Bloomfield, Physics (lab3e@virginia.edu)
 
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African-American and African Studies
 AAS 2559New Course in African and African American Studies
 Black Girlhood & the Media
19570 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed 30 / 30Ashleigh WadeTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amNew Cabell Hall 338
 How do movies, viral videos, and memes impact the material lives of Black girls? This course offers an introduction to the emergent and growing field of Black Girlhood Studies, especially in relation to media representation and engagement. The course will cover foundational texts about Black girlhood alongside a range of media – newspapers, magazines, film, and Internet/social media content – to explore the ways in which Black girlhood has been constructed and portrayed through these platforms. We will use these explorations as a way of 1) understanding the tenets of Black girlhood studies and 2) identifying what is at stake in documenting and representing Black girls’ experiences. As part of the course, students will have an opportunity to create their own media/text (YouTube video, website/blog, essay collection, chapbook, etc.) about Black girlhood.
 AAS 3559New Course in African and African American Studies
 Africulture: The African Roots of US Agriculture
20561 001SEM (3 Units)Closed10 / 10 (18 / 20)Michael Carter Jr.+1Tu 2:00pm - 4:30pmNew Cabell Hall 303
 Taught by Mr. Michael Carter, Jr. of Carter Farms; supported by Prof. Lisa Shutt
 Led by a practicing farmer-activist, (Michael Carter, Jr. of Carter Farms in nearby Orange County, VA) we will examine how principles, practices, plants, and people of African descent have shaped US agriculture and thus, the lives of all Americans. By examining a wide range of history, laws, attitudes, cultures and traditions, we will see how many US staple commodities and practices have their roots in Africa and observe cultural similarities between indigenous cultures around the world. While evaluating realities of today’s Black farmers and the innovations they devise to survive in a system stacked against them, we will look for solutions to an array of challenges in environmental and agricultural sciences faced by today’s Black farmers.
 AAS 4501Advanced Research Seminar in History & AAS
 Engaging Local Histories: River View Farm
19287 001SEM (4 Units)Open 3 / 15Lisa ShuttTh 2:00pm - 6:00pmNew Cabell Hall 068
 The four hour time block is to allow for travel to River View Farm on some weeks and to provide enough time for the occasional field trip.
  (The four hour time block is to allow for travel to River View Farm on some weeks and to provide enough time for the occasional field trip.) This course aims to encourage students to situate and shed light on various aspects of Black history and culture in Albemarle County and the surrounding regions through the lens and example of River View Farm and those who created it, lived there, farmed there, and led local and regional communities in a number of ways. We will often hold class meetings on site at the farm (not far from grounds in Albemarle County) and engage various sources to become knowledgeable about Hugh Carr, whose earnings as the farm manager of the nearby Woodlands plantation enabled him to establish the farm with a 58-acre tract in the late 1860s. By examining the lives of Carr’s daughter, Mary Carr Greer, who was the first female principal of the Albemarle Training School and her husband, Conly Greer, Albemarle County’s first Black agricultural extension agent, we will follow students’ interests to examine topics ranging from the early post-emancipation lives of formerly enslaved men and women, the Black Extension Service and Land Grant University system, Black 4-H youth programs, women’s “Demonstration Clubs,” the history of African American education in the region between 1840 and the mid-20th century, Black agricultural history, local Albemarle County histories of the Civil Rights Movement, African American communities such as Hydraulic Mills and Union Ridge (and the flooding of Albemarle Black communities to build a reservoir), the impact of global forces on local experiences, African American foodways, the importance and format of kitchen gardens, museum studies, the history of historicizing River View Farm and other local sites related to Black history, and many more possible topics. Part of the work of this class involves actively working with the Ivy Creek Foundation to support their mission of providing education about local Black histories to the public. Students will produce a 20-page paper on their original research using archival materials (including a wealth of recorded interviews), material culture, and of the landscape/built environment. 4.0 credits
American Studies
 AMST 2422Point of View Journalism
19927 001SEM (3 Units)Closed 34 / 30 (34 / 30)Lisa GoffTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmJohn W. Warner Hall 115
 No waitlist but spaces sometimes open up. Email Prof. Goff at lg6t@virginia.edu.
 This course examines the history and practice of “point-of-view” journalism, a controversial but credible alternative to the dominant model of “objectivity” on the part of the news media. Not to be confused with “fake news,” point-of-view journalism has a history as long as the nation’s, from Tom Paine and Benjamin Franklin in the eighteenth century to "muckrakers" like Ida B. Wells Barnett and Ida Tarbell at the end of the nineteenth, and “New Journalism” practitioners like Tom Wolfe, Joan Didion, and Hunter Thompson in the twentieth. Twenty-first century point-of-view practitioners include news organizations on the right (Fox News, One America News Network) and left (Vice, Jacobin, MSNBC, Democracy Now), as well as prominent voices like Ta-Nehisi Coates, Rebecca Solnit, Barbara Ehrenreich, and Jia Tolentino. We will also consider the rise of “fake news.” A term formerly used to indicate the work of entertainers such as Jon Stewart and Steven Colbert, who pilloried the news (and newsmakers) in order to interpret them, “fake news” is now an established practice of the far right, as well as a political slur used to denigrate the work of mainstream (center and left-of-center) news organizations.
 AMST 3559New Course in American Studies
 Mapping Black Landscapes
19547 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed 16 / 16 (16 / 16)Lisa GoffTu 3:30pm - 6:00pmNew Cabell Hall 323
 Students in this class will learn to use digital mapping and digital narrative skills as tools of reparative history. The class will partner with community organizations documenting Black history in central Virginia. Students will do research in historical archives and public records; interview community members; and participate in field work (e.g. geolocating gravesites, photographing historic sites, etc.). Readings will provide an overview of the history of Reconstruction; address ethical aspects of doing community history and oral history in particular; and explore public history approaches to the history of slavery and Reconstruction, with a special emphasis on overlooked or marginalized histories. Assignments (no midterm or final): 1. Each student will compose a 5-page paper or comparable digital product posing ethical questions about documenting, mapping, and archiving histories that are not their own. 2. Students will contribute to an ongoing digital humanities project based in the library, which seeks to create a phone book and accompanying map that documents the addresses of Black Charlottesvillians in 1920; and to the “Finding Virginia’s Freetowns” ArcGIS project that seeks to map Reconstruction-era Black settlements in central Virginia. 3. Working in groups, students will help build a database of names of Black students who attended the Dunbar Rosenwald School in Fluvanna County in the 1930s, working with community members who seek to preserve the building and its history.
 AMST 4321Caribbean Latinx: Cuba, Puerto Rico and the DR
19809 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18 (18 / 18)Carmen LamasTu 3:30pm - 6:00pmNew Cabell Hall 368
 This course counts for the AMST Fourth-Year Seminar
 AMST 4500Fourth-Year Seminar in American Studies
 TBD
 "Multiculturalism and its Discontents"
19821 003SEM (3 Units)Open8 / 18Sandhya ShuklaTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmBryan Hall 310
 This course examines the theories, politics and representational practices of multiculturalism. As an oft-stated ideal, of many kinds of peoples living together, and a problem, of how to determine rights for, and build institutions that incorporate varied groups of people, multiculturalism captures a range of political interests and cultural possibilities. And in a post-9/11 and postmodern world in which peoples move across all sorts of boundaries (national, racial, class, gender, sexual), yet remain deeply shaped by those boundaries, the question of how difference is going to be managed has become increasingly urgent. In discussions and through projects stimulated by materials that seek to make sense of diversity, we will ask questions about history, nation, identity and form. Is the multiculturalism of other eras similar to that of the present? Can we conjure up an ideal that extends beyond liberal tolerance? What models for complex societies exist in places other than the United States? How do thinkers and writers of our time imagine the conflicts and intimacies of the world that they face, in which displacement, migration, racial conflict and violence are abiding experiences? And might other terms, like “multiethnic,” or “intercultural,” or “cross-cultural” develop important new directions for thinking about living in not just with difference? Tacking between the United States and Britain should enable comparative and transnational perspectives. We will consider theoretical-conceptual works by writers such as Stuart Hall, Charles Taylor, Linda Alcoff, Kwame Anthony Appiah, Kenan Malik, and Iris Marion Young; we will read fiction by writers such as Karen Tei Yamashita, Zadie Smith, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Tayari Jones, Teju Cole, Tommy Orange; and we will engage with a variety of other cultural texts, like films, art and performance. Assignments will include critical reading reflections, a short (5-7 pp) essay and a longer (10-12 pp) paper. We may also attend a local production together.
 AMST 5559New Course in American Studies
 Mapping Black Landscapes
20533 001SEM (3 Units)Permission5 / 10 (16 / 16)Lisa GoffTu 3:30pm - 6:00pmNew Cabell Hall 323
 This is an applications course for students in graduate programs at UVA. Students will hone their digital mapping and digital narrative skills and learn how to use them as tools of reparative history. The class will partner with community organizations documenting Black history. Students will do research in historical archives and public records; interview community members; and participate in field work (e.g. geolocating gravesites, photographing historic sites, etc.). Readings will provide an overview of the history of Reconstruction; address ethical aspects of doing community history and oral history in particular; and explore public history approaches to the history of slavery and Reconstruction, with a special emphasis on overlooked or marginalized histories. In addition, students will do a focused set of readings by members of the Black Geographers movement, which emphasizes Black epistemologies of place-making. Assignments (no midterm or final): 1. Each student will compose a 5-page paper or comparable digital product posing ethical questions about documenting, mapping, and archiving histories that are not their own. 2. Each student will compose a 7-page paper or comparable digital product addressing modes of placemaking epistemologies, and analyzing the pros and cons of each for the class projects they’re working on this semester. 3. Students will create or add to ArcGIS maps relating to Black history in central Virginia, particularly the “Finding Virginia’s Freetowns” mapping project. 4. Each student will research, design, and produce a public-facing StoryMap about a Reconstruction-era Black settlement in central Virginia. This project will combine all the skills they’ve learned during the semester, and be suitable for including in their portfolio after graduation.
Applied Mathematics
 APMA 3110Applied Statistics and Probability
20855 003Lecture (3 Units)Permission48 / 45Deepyaman MaitiMoWeFr 11:00am - 11:50amThornton Hall D223
 This section of APMA 3110 will stress using the R software environment for computations, especially in the applied statistics part of the course. R is widely used by researchers and in the industry to statistically analyze and present data of all kinds. No prior knowledge of R is necessary, as supplemental instruction on using R, along with short exercises to check your knowledge will be provided along the way.
History of Art and Architecture
 ARAH 9565Seminar in Art Theory, Comparative & Other Topics
 Transgender Methods for Art & Performance History
18754 001SEM (3 Units)Open 6 / 12David GetsyTh 3:30pm - 6:00pmFayerweather Hall 206
 The seminar is coordinated with a visiting scholar series sponsored by the Institute for Humanities and Global Cultures on "Global Histories and Transgender Studies in the Humanities," and it will involve seminar sessions with visiting scholars at multiple points in the Spring semester.
 This seminar will introduce methods from transgender studies, asking how histories of art and performance can be re-viewed through gender's multiplicity and mutability. Topics include the recovery of histories of transgender subjects, the capacity of nonbinary or transformational genders to change how we view all archives, and the methods and impact of historians (both trans and non-trans) who center gender's transformability and variability. Readings will be partially drawn from this resource co-developed by the instructor: http://artjournal.collegeart.org/?p=16500
Architectural History
 ARH 4591Undergraduate Seminar in the History of Architecture
 Medieval Mediterranean
14280 001SEM (3 Units)Closed 6 / 6 (11 / 12)Lisa ReillyWe 9:30am - 12:00pmFayerweather Hall 208
 Because this class is cross listed with art history, SIS will not allow a waiting list. If the course is full and you are interested, please email me at lar2f@virginia.edu
 The Crusades are just one aspect of the many interactions between Muslim, Latin & Byzantine Christian and Jewish culture during the Middle Ages. Trade, intellectual exchange and diplomatic missions also provide opportunities for cultural exchange and interaction among these groups. This seminar will explore the architecture and art of the many cultures, which occupy the lands bordering the Mediterranean during the Middle Ages (with a focus on c. 800-c. 1400). Readings and research projects will explore the nature of these interactions through an analysis of visual culture from the Mediterranean as well as readings, which will include on primary readings such as the travel diary of Muslim traveler Ibn Jubayr and the parallel account by Rabbi Benjamin of Tudela. The course will also emphasize the development of research and writing skills, as each member of the seminar will work on major research project throughout the semester. This course fulfills the Second Writing Requirement
History of Art
 ARTH 4591Undergraduate Seminar in the History of Art
 Subversive Prints
18749 001SEM (3 Units)Open 3 / 12Douglas FordhamMo 11:00am - 1:30pmFayerweather Hall 208
 A hands-on examination of printed images from the Renaissance to the present focusing on the ways in which printmaking challenged or undermined political authority and social conventions.
 Medieval Mediterranean
18752 005SEM (3 Units)Open 5 / 6 (11 / 12)Lisa ReillyWe 9:30am - 12:00pmFayerweather Hall 208
 Because this course is cross listed - SIS will not make a waiting list so if it is full and you are interested - please email me at lar2f@virginia.edu
 The Crusades are just one aspect of the many interactions between Muslim, Latin & Byzantine Christian and Jewish culture during the Middle Ages. Trade, intellectual exchange and diplomatic missions also provide opportunities for cultural exchange and interaction among these groups. This seminar will explore the architecture and art of the many cultures, which occupy the lands bordering the Mediterranean during the Middle Ages (with a focus on c. 800-c. 1400). Readings and research projects will explore the nature of these interactions through an analysis of visual culture from the Mediterranean as well as readings, which will include on primary readings such as the travel diary of Muslim traveler Ibn Jubayr and the parallel account by Rabbi Benjamin of Tudela. The course will also emphasize the development of research and writing skills, as each member of the seminar will work on major research project throughout the semester. This course fulfills the Second Writing Requirement
American Sign Language
 ASL 3410Contemporary Disability Theory
20647 001SEM (3 Units)Open 29 / 30 (29 / 30)Christopher KrentzMoWeFr 12:00pm - 12:50pmClark Hall 102
 Over the last several decades, thinking about people with physical, cognitive, and sensory differences has moved from a mostly pathological medical-based understanding to a more rights-based framework, although both models persist and overlap. In this course we will consider how conceptions of disability have (or have not) changed, considering such matters as how a disability is defined; disability in American history; autism and neurodivergence; deaf culture and medical interventions; disability and race, gender, class, and sexual orientation; and much more. The class will also consider how these theories relate to the depiction of disabled people in literature and film. Possible texts include Goffman’s Stigma; Wells’ “The Country of the Blind”; Coetzee’s Waiting for the Barbarians; Desai’s Fasting, Feasting; Nussbaum’s Good Kings, Bad Kings; Novic’s True Biz; and the films Unrest and Crip Camp. The class will feature a range of learning strategies, from whole-class discussion to smaller-group discussion to short lectures. Requirements will include two papers, quizzes, and active informed participation.
Biology
 BIOL 4260Cellular Mechanisms
 Drug Repurposing: An emerging strategy to target cancer hallmarks
11508 001Lecture (3 Units)Permission 49 / 48Mike WormingtonTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmChemistry Bldg 206
 Corrected prerequisites: BIOL 3000 and any one of BIOL 3010, 3030, 3040, 3050, or any one of CHEM 4410, 4420, 4440.
Classics
 CLAS 3559New Course in Classics
 Helen of Troy
19362 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 5 / 25Giulio CelottoMoWeFr 3:00pm - 3:50pmCocke Hall 115
 This course will examine the character of Helen of Troy in Ancient Greek and Roman mythology and literature. As the most beautiful woman in the world, who causes the greatest war in classical antiquity, Helen embodies the intrinsic ambiguity of the female; as the ultimate object of desire, who pursues desires of her own, she models the position of women as objects with agency; as the iconic errant wife, who must be retrieved by her husband, she is the foundation of Greek masculinity, which is grounded in the control of women; as a Greek woman who runs off with a barbarian, she is a vehicle for defining Greek self-perception. Thus, authors in every period and genre use Helen to tackle issues of gender dynamics, as well as to wrestle with questions of cultural identity. In this course we will read all the surviving Greek and Latin texts in which Helen makes a significant appearance, including the works of Homer, Sappho, Euripides, Gorgias, Vergil, and Ovid. Although literature will be the main focus of our investigation, we will also discuss the presence of Helen in ancient art, and her reception in later times.
Commerce
 COMM 4559New Course in Commerce
 Ethical Application of Artificial Intelligence
20290 002Lecture (3 Units)Open 29 / 35Steven JohnsonTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmRobertson Hall 256
 Artificial Intelligence (AI) combines algorithms in complex, data-driven ways with difficult-to-predict outcomes. It has become an essential yet largely invisible component of our modern global society. All across the world, AI allows for the automation of business rules, policies, and decision-making at a large scale. Through identification of and reflection on how personal values and societal values relate to those embedded in AI deployments, students will be able to articulate the potential benefits and harms of AI technology to individuals, organizations, and global society. Students will learn about various applications of AI, including marketing, management, life sciences, government policy, education, and transportation. Topics include how to manage AI, ethical frameworks, types and sources of algorithmic bias, guidelines for responsible use of AI, and accountable autonomy. The course is primarily based on readings, research, and discussion (80%) and also incorporates using low-code AI solutions (20%) to analyze how the source and quality of data sources impact AI bias and performance. The course includes both individual and team-based assignments.
 Doing Business in China
 Navigating the Cross-cultural Challenges
20315 003Lecture (3 Units)Open 18 / 25Mark MetcalfMo 3:30pm - 6:00pmRobertson Hall 260
 Non-COMM 4th year students may register with instructor permission.
 Doing Business in China (“DBi China”) is an introduction to the People’s Republic of China (PRC) cultural anthropological, sociological, and political features that contribute to the nation’s distinctive business practices. The goal of the course is for students to develop an awareness of and appreciation for the breadth of factors that influence Chinese business practices. The course will explore the origins and significance of interpersonal factors such as relationships (guanxi), honesty, indirection, and “face” in business interactions and negotiations. Such social norms have deep historical roots in China and have a profound impact on Chinese social relationships, but are frequently sources of frustration (or worse) for nonChinese people doing business in the PRC. Understanding how and why such factors are employed in Chinese society will help to better identify and appropriately respond to them. We will also discuss historical Confucianism and Daoism, traditional philosophies that continue to influence Chinese society. Case studies will be used throughout the course to provide practical examples of Chinese business practices. For additional context, we will also discuss relevant PRC views regarding history, geography, governance, and global standing; perspectives that greatly influence both domestic and international policy and can impact the business environment. Particular attention will be given to the pervasive and growing influence of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) on PRC society and China’s growing international activities (e.g., the Belt and Road Initiative [BRI]). The course will be conducted as a seminar and students will be expected to actively participate in classroom discussions. Approximately 100 pages of reading will be assigned each week. Three 4-page (1000-word) papers that analyze various practical aspects (e.g. case studies) of business practices will be assigned. The final assignment will be a team project (class presentation & 3000-word-paper) that applies concepts discussed throughout the semester to analyze and respond to a business case that typifies the cross-cultural challenges of doing business in China.
 COMM 4822Invest in Sustainable Future
14478 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 26 / 30Mark WhiteMo 2:00pm - 4:45pmRobertson Hall 221
 This interdisciplinary course explores four critical areas at the intersection of business and sustainability: 1) Climate Finance, 2) Conservation Finance, 3) Circular Economy and 4) ESG Investing. In addition to acquiring an understanding of key sustainability challenges, participants will gain skill in applying analytical tools and techniques to the evaluation of sustainable investment opportunities.
Computer Science
 CS 3140Software Development Essentials
19792 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 180 / 240Rich NguyenTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmJohn W. Warner Hall 209
 CS 3140 is required for both majors (BA and BS) and minors in the new curriculum and mandates CS 2100 as a hard prerequisite. This course cannot be taken as an elective for old curriculum students (both BA and BS) due to overlap with 2110 and 3240 material.
 
 CS 4501Special Topics in Computer Science
 Introduction to Algorithmic Economics
 Introduction to Algorithmic Economics
15686 001Lecture (3 Units)Permission0 / 45Hongning Wang+1MoWe 12:30pm - 1:45pmOlsson Hall 018
 Class enrollment is by instructor permission due to room capacity. We anticipate to allow anyone who attends the first week of lectures to enroll.
 The course will cover recent work in Computer Science and Economics the enables the appropriate analysis of dynamic marketplaces where agents rely on algorithmic tools to make decisions and compete. The course will cover a range of fundamental concepts from machine learning and convex optimization and connect them with the concepts in game theory and Economics of information.
 Autonomous Vehicles: Perception,Planning & Control
 F1/10 Autonomous Racing: Perception, Planning, and Control for Autonomous Driving
Website  15912 003Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (34 / 199)40 / 40Madhur BehlTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amRice Hall 120
 Students will work in teams to build, drive, and race 1/10th scale autonomous cars, while learning about the principles of perception, planning, and control. You will learn to use robot operating system (ROS), integrate various sensors (IMU, Cameras, LIDAR) on an embedded computer, and implement algorithms for localization, mapping, path planning, and control. The course culminates in a F1/10 a "battle of algorithms" race among the teams.
Dance
 DANC 2230Jazz Dance I
19817 001STO (1 Units)Permission13 / 18Kim MataTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmMemorial Gymnasium 120-MP
 This course is not intended for absolute beginners. The first day of class will serve as a placement class to be sure the level is the right fit for each individual student. Students will be granted official permission to enroll following the first day of class.
 DANC 3220Modern/Contemporary II
19818 001STO (1 Units)Permission5 / 18Kim MataMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmMemorial Gymnasium 120-MP
 This course is not intended for absolute beginners. The first day of class will serve as a placement class for students who have not yet successfully completed DANC 2220 (level I) to be sure the level is the right fit for each individual student. Students will be granted official permission to enroll following the first day of class.
Electrical and Computer Engineering
 ECE 1501Special Topics in Electrical & Computer Engineering
 Frontiers in Electrical & Computer Engineering
 Time: Thurs 4-4:50pm. Location: Rice 340. Information to be updated on SIS.
20082 001Lecture (1 Units)Open10 / 38Xu YiTh 4:00pm - 4:50pmRice Hall 340
 This course will feature weekly seminars by ECE guest speakers and student-led discussions on cutting-edge electrical and computer engineering research themes, including: IoT; artificial intelligence & machine learning; health & medical applications; modern devices (nanoelectronics, photonics, renewable energy); applications for astronomy; and emerging quantum technology. No prerequisite, no homework, no exam, and students will be evaluated by class participation.
 This course will feature weekly seminars by ECE guest speakers and student-led discussions on cutting-edge electrical and computer engineering research themes, including: IoT; artificial intelligence & machine learning; health & medical applications; modern devices (nanoelectronics, photonics, renewable energy); applications for astronomy; and emerging quantum technology. No prerequisite, no homework, no exam, and students will be evaluated by class participation. Tentative seminar topics: (1) ECE in science (2 weeks): Detecting exoplanets and imaging black holes with ECE technologies. (2) ECE in health applications (3 weeks): surgical robots, understanding the brain, and wearable bioimaging (student speaker). (3) ECE in artificial intelligence, machine learning, cyber security, and the internet of things (3 weeks). (4) Modern ECE devices (3 weeks): devices for renewable energy, nanoelectronics, and integrated photonics. (5) Quantum technology (student speaker, 3 weeks): quantum computing, quantum information, and state-of-the-art quantum systems.
 ECE 2501Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering
 Applied Circuits
20086 001Lecture (3 Units)Permission23 / 93Adam BarnesMoWeFr 9:00am - 10:30amThornton Hall A120
 This is a pilot course to replace ECE2630 Fundamentals of Electrical and Computer Engineering I
 This is a fundamental circuits course blending theory with hands-on experiments and real-world applications that provides a foundation for electrical and computer engineering courses.
 ECE 2502Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering
 Applied Physics: Electricity and Magnetism
20385 001Lecture (4 Units)Wait List (17 / 199) 105 / 100Keith WilliamsMoWeFr 12:00pm - 12:50pmRice Hall 130
 An applied physics course in electricity in magnetism, with emphasis on the physical basis for techologies including radio, Bluetooth, WiFi, and GPS. An integrated lab component will provide team-based, hands-on examples and reviews of key concepts. Calculus 3 (Multivariable) may be taken concurrently; however, students should be proficient with vectors and calculus including chain rule and trigonometric functions. Prerequisite: Calculus-based Physics 1.
Economics
 ECON 4740Introduction to Algorithmic Economics
 Introduction to Algorithmic Economics
20923 001Lecture (3 Units)Permission 0 / 20Hongning Wang+1MoWe 12:30pm - 1:45pmOlsson Hall 018
 Class enrollment is by instructor permission due to room capacity. We anticipate to allow anyone who attends the first week of lectures to enroll.
 The course will cover recent work in Computer Science and Economics the enables the appropriate analysis of dynamic marketplaces where agents rely on algorithmic tools to make decisions and compete. The course will cover a range of fundamental concepts from machine learning and convex optimization and connect them with the concepts in game theory and Economics of information.
Creative Writing
 ENCW 3559New Course in Creative Writing
 Storytelling and Performance Prose
19942 001Lecture (3 Units)Permission5 / 12Anna Martin-BeecherTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 044
 Admission by Instructor Permission. Please send a sample of your prose writing (around 5 pages) and a brief statement (1 page max) about why this course interests you to am2aw@virginia.edu.
 This course is for students with experience of writing creatively, interested in writing fiction and other texts to be spoken aloud, embodied and shared with others in real time. Over the semester you will develop original stories, work on putting them ‘up on their feet’ in performance and explore how liveness and orality can challenge, shape and invigorate writing. We will also touch upon the oral roots of literature, reading works such as the 1001 Nights and the stories collected by the Brothers Grimm and the texts they have inspired. We will read, watch and discuss works of fiction, live-art, narrative comedy, spoken word and drama. You may be a fiction writer, interested in how spoken stories could attune your ear for language and narrative pattern, or writer and performer interested in marrying those two passions. Performance experience is not a requirement for this class, but a willingness to explore performance in a supportive atmosphere is essential.
 ENCW 3610Intermediate Fiction Writing
19941 001WKS (3 Units)Permission 2 / 12Anna Martin-BeecherTh 11:00am - 1:30pmDawson's Row 1
 Admission by Instructor Permission. Please send a sample of your prose writing (around 5 pages) and a brief statement (1 page max) about why this course interests you to am2aw@virginia.edu.
 For students advanced beyond the level of ENCW 2600. Involves workshop of student work, craft discussions, and relevant reading. May be repeated with different instructor. For instructions on how to apply to this class or more details, please visit our program website at creativewriting.virginia.edu/ugrad.
 WRITING THE LONG(ER) STORY
20003 002WKS (3 Units)Permission 2 / 12Jane AlisonWe 2:00pm - 4:30pmBryan Hall 233
 Unless you are in the APLP program, instructor permission is required. Please send Jane Alison (jas2ad) a note saying who you are why you’re interested in this class, together with a brief (10-page max) writing sample. I'll read applications in early December and let you know soon thereafter.
 A class for ambitious students who want to explore ways of crafting longer literary fiction. We’ll examine how writers have worked within the long story’s more leisurely scope—contracting and expanding time, organizing structure, shifting among points of view, sculpting spaces, rendering thought, controlling tensions—so that you can develop your own long story. The class will revolve around your writing and published texts that will run from fabulist to realist to faux-nonfiction, possibly including works of Alice Munro, William Gass, Gabriel García Márquez, Lydia Davis, Vikram Chandra, George Saunders.
 ENCW 4550Topics in Literary Prose
 Dialogue: Writing the Exchange
19940 001SEM (3 Units)Permission 9 / 15Anna Martin-BeecherTu 11:00am - 1:30pmDawson's Row 1
 Unless you are in the APLP program, instructor permission required. Please email am2aw@virginia.edu with 3-5 pages of your creative writing and a statement (no more than a page) about why you are interested in the class.
 A course for writers on dialogue in fiction and other forms, exploring rhythm, power and the electric relationship between the uttered and unsaid. Expect to read and discuss plays, short stories, experimental novels and poems from writers including Annie Baker, Gayl Jones, Martin Crimp, Raymond Carver, Ann Quinn and Danielle Evans and to explore dialogue in your own writing. This course is one of two required readings courses for students admitted to the Area Program in Literary Prose. It is also open to other qualified students. Please apply BOTH through SIS and by emailing am2aw@virginia.edu with a paragraph about your writing interests and experience. A writing sample may also be requested.
 ENCW 4820Poetry Program Poetics
 APPW POETICS SEMINAR: MYSTERY AND CLARITY
20702 002SEM (3 Units)Permission11 / 12Debra NystromWe 2:00pm - 4:30pmDawson's Row 1
 ENCW 4820 APPW POETICS SEMINAR: MYSTERY AND CLARITY 2:00-4:30 Wednesdays Restricted to Instructor Permission Instructor: Debra Nystrom A 2.5-hour once-weekly seminar class for APPW students and other advanced poetry students. We will read the work of a large variety of poets ranging from Emily Dickinson to Octavio Paz to Li-Young Lee to Aracelis Girmay, as well as the work of some prose writers, and we’ll also engage early in the semester with the exhibit of Joseph Cornell’s shadowboxes at UVA’s Fralin Art Museum. Our attention will be on examining from all angles the relationship between mystery and clarity in art. Along with discussion of our reading and visual materials, students will have regular opportunities to try out focused exercises and to bring their own work into class for discussion. INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION IS REQUIRED FOR ENROLLMENT. Please request instructor permission through SIS and apply through email. APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: writing sample of 4-5 poems IN A SINGLE WORD DOCUMENT with a cover sheet including your name, year, email address, major, prior workshop experience, and whether or not you are a member of the APPW Program. Submit your application to Prof. Nystrom at dln8u@virginia.edu . Applications will be considered on a rolling basis as soon as registration opens. Class will be held both online and in person outdoors on grounds when weather permits.
 ENCW 7310MFA Poetry Workshop
 AND SO THE CONVERSATION TURNS
20004 001WKS (3 Units)Permission10 / 10Kiki PetrosinoTu 2:00pm - 4:30pmDawson's Row 1
 This graduate-level workshop, designed for MFA poets in the first two years of the program, invites students to continue developing their own writing practices while adding new critical & compositional techniques to their repertoires. We’ll devote most class sessions to reviewing peer-generated poetry, but we’ll also discuss published works & take time to explore other aspects of the creative process. For this semester's craft topic, we'll focus on the importance of turns as technical & rhetorical occasions for signaling change, transition, or transformation in a poem. Students should be prepared to engage energetically in “workshop,” or peer review, in addition to polishing their own writing. Each student will serve as First Commenter for select peer manuscripts, preparing robust introductory remarks for workshop. Students will compose several postings on COLLAB forums on relevant topics and, as a final project, prepare a portfolio collecting revised poetry & a portfolio letter. The final grade will be calculated based on the above items, plus attendance, one post-workshop office hours consultation and participation. Instructor permission required.
English-Literature
 ENGL 2502Masterpieces of English Literature
 Locating Jane. Or, Putting Austen in her Place
19939 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (11 / 99) 20 / 20Alison HurleyTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amNew Cabell Hall 191
 Jane Austen is everywhere – at movie theaters, on coffee mugs, in myriad sequels, parodies, and re-imaginings of her novels. How is it that an author whose works are so deeply embedded in her own time remains a contemporary phenomenon? How is it that novels depicting a remarkably thin slice of a defunct society enjoy such broad appeal? In this course we will try to answer these questions by “putting Austen in her place.” We will carefully situate Austen’s novels within a number of specific but overlapping interpretive terrains – literary, political, intellectual, and gendered. By deeply contextualizing Austen, I believe we will be in a better position to assess her significance in both her world and in our own. In order to perform this work we will need to develop the skills necessary for reading and writing effectively about texts. Specifically, we will aspire to read closely, write precisely, argue persuasively, ask good questions, employ strong evidence, and take interpretive risks. Our readings will most likely include: Sense and Sensibility, Emma, Mansfield Park and Persuasion. Sorry, no P&P!
 ENGL 2508Studies in Fiction
 Science Fiction
19319 002SEM (3 Units)Wait List (32 / 199) 20 / 20Patricia SullivanTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmBryan Hall 235
 Like to sink into a book that challenges the ways we think about ourselves by imagining other worlds, speculative futures, aliens, artificial intelligences, cyborgs, technology and society at their best and possible worst, and more? We will read several books that are classified loosely as science fiction, though there may be some overlap with other genres such as speculative fiction or climate fiction. Along the way, we will consider key conventions and aspects of the novel as a genre, questions of social relevance, and the past, present, and future of science fiction. We will also practice close reading strategies, reflect on acts of literary interpretation through brief references to critical essays, inquire into some of the functions and effects of fictional narratives, and practice constructing both reflective and argumentative essays. Students will write regular reading responses and exploratory pieces, lead seminar discussions in groups, write three short essays, and take a brief final exam. This course fulfills the second writing (or writing-enhanced) requirement. ENGL2508 also prepares students interested in the English major for upper-level coursework in literature, though all majors are welcome.
 Contemporary Novel
19938 004SEM (3 Units)Wait List (8 / 99) 20 / 20Christopher KrentzMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 364
 This course will provide an introduction to the contemporary American novel. We will read some celebrated fiction published since 1960, probably including Roth’s Goodbye Columbus; Morrison’s Sula; Díaz’s The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao; Bechdel's graphic novel Fun Home; Kingsolver's new Demon Copperhead, and Amna's recent debut American Fever. Focusing on whatever themes the novels raise, we’ll talk about narrative style, ethnicity and identity in America, and much more. Moreover, we’ll concentrate on developing analytical and writing skills, which should help students to succeed in other English and humanities classes. The course will fulfill the second writing requirement.
 The Novel of Upbringing
20028 005SEM (3 Units)Wait List (11 / 99) 20 / 20James KinneyTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmBrooks Hall 103
 The Novel of Upbringing -- How does the fictional representation of upbringing reflect on the cultural uses of fiction in general as well as the actual work of becoming adult? Works to be studied: Jane Austen, Emma; Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre; Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; Charles Dickens, Great Expectations; Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn; Michael Malone, Handling Sin. Class requirements: Lively participation including 8 brief email responses, one short and one longer essay, and a final exam.
 ENGL 2592Women in Literature
 Contemporary Feminist Theory & 18th-Cent Fiction
20038 002SEM (3 Units)Wait List (10 / 99) 20 / 20Natalie ThompsonTuTh 5:00pm - 6:15pmThe Rotunda Room 150
 Surprisingly, today’s theories of gender and sexuality are often constructed and negotiated by looking back to the past. Many contemporary theorists use eighteenth-century literature and culture as a touchstone, a way to analyze and question our current conceptions of gender and sexuality. In this course, we will read (and watch) novels, memoirs, and cultural accounts from the eighteenth and nineteenth century alongside current theories of gender and sexuality. This course requires no previous knowledge of feminist/sexuality theory or of its eighteenth- and nineteenth-century contexts. This is a writing-intensive course which will balance small weekly writing assignments with three larger essays. We’ll focus on how to grow and feel comfortable thinking and writing critically, as well as revising wisely. We’ll promote lively discussion of the ways we perceive and construct gender and sexuality today, as well as the ways current theories invoke or employ tropes and realities from the past. The course is also designed as an introduction to the study of literature at the college level. We’ll discuss foundational modes and methods of writing and thinking about literature and culture (what even is “close reading,” really?), explicitly talk about how to execute them, and try them out ourselves. Primary texts will likely include The Woman of Colour, Sense and Sensibility, and excerpts from the television show Harlots. Critical readings include essays and theories from Eve Sedgwick, Michel Foucault, Hortense Spillers, and Saidiya Hartman. This writing intensive course (three papers totaling 20 pages) satisfies the prerequisite for the English major as well as the second-writing requirement.
 ENGL 2599Special Topics
 The World Wars in European Literature
19932 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (6 / 99) 20 / 20Sarah ColeMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmMonroe Hall 114
 The First and Second World Wars transformed European culture and challenged poets, novelists, and filmmakers. Why create art in a time a mass violence and upheaval? How could a poem, film, or literary narrative do justice to the raw experience of war? In this course, we will explore a diverse group of responses from authors in Britain, France, and Germany, ranging from the gritty realism of Remarque’s All Quiet on the Western Front to the elegant modernism of Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway. We will pay equal attention to literary techniques and social identities, examining questions of gender, class, ethnicity, and disability in war literature. The seminar will emphasize close reading, active participation, and analytical writing. Requirements include three essays, an in-class presentation, and weekly discussion questions. Among our main texts will be poems by Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon, and Paul Celan; novels by Virginia Woolf, Erich Maria Remarque, and Irene Nemirovsky; memoirs by Vera Brittain and Elie Wiesel; and films by Jean Renoir and Louis Malle.
 The Past in Medieval Literature
20034 002SEM (3 Units)Wait List (1 / 99) 20 / 20Katherine ChurchillTuTh 5:00pm - 6:15pmNau Hall 241
 If "what's past is prologue"—where does that put the Middle Ages? As preface, prequel, to the main action? How do we situate or relegate the past, what does it mean to do so? What does “doing” history entail? For us, the Middle Ages conjures up images of crumbling castles or rusty suits of armor. But for medieval Western Europeans, the past was Roman ruins, the fall of Troy, and Arthur's court. Using both medieval English literature (including, perhaps, Old English lyrics, Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde, and prologues by John Gower and William Caxton) and contemporary memory studies, historical, and archival theory, this class will show how medieval conceptions of the past can help us understand temporality and periodization as modes of powerbrokering and history-shaping. In doing so, we will consider how the past functions in the present—perhaps it's not even so bygone after all.
 King Arthur in Time
 King Arthur in Time
20039 003SEM (3 Units)Wait List (4 / 99) 20 / 20Courtney WattsMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmClark Hall G004
 King Arthur and his knights of the Round Table are a romanticized staple in nostalgic notions of the medieval past. But who is King Arthur, and where did his legend come from? This course will chart the history of King Arthur in literature, from his early Welsh origins through medieval chronicle and romance, modern poetry and novel, and contemporary film. Along the way, we will consider how the changing historical context and conventions of genre shape and transform the Arthurian mythos. Whenever they were written, texts about King Arthur are always set in the mythic past, shrouded by the mists of half-forgotten history. How does the past function in the world of literary imagination? And what are the political uses of the imagined past? As we read famous works of literature, whether from the twelfth century or the twentieth, we will explore not only medieval narrative but also narratives about the Middle Ages. As writers, we will step into the unfolding history of Arthurian narrative to speak back to these texts and the critics who read them.
 ENGL 2910Point of View Journalism
19926 001SEM (3 Units)Closed 34 / 30 (34 / 30)Lisa GoffTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmJohn W. Warner Hall 115
 No waitlist but spaces sometimes open up. Email Prof. Goff at lg6t@virginia.edu.
 This course examines the history and practice of “point-of-view” journalism, a controversial but credible alternative to the dominant model of “objectivity” on the part of the news media. Not to be confused with “fake news,” point-of-view journalism has a history as long as the nation’s, from Tom Paine and Benjamin Franklin in the eighteenth century to "muckrakers" like Ida B. Wells Barnett and Ida Tarbell at the end of the nineteenth, and “New Journalism” practitioners like Tom Wolfe, Joan Didion, and Hunter Thompson in the twentieth. Twenty-first century point-of-view practitioners include news organizations on the right (Fox News, One America News Network) and left (Vice, Jacobin, MSNBC, Democracy Now), as well as prominent voices like Ta-Nehisi Coates, Rebecca Solnit, Barbara Ehrenreich, and Jia Tolentino. We will also consider the rise of “fake news.” A term formerly used to indicate the work of entertainers such as Jon Stewart and Steven Colbert, who pilloried the news (and newsmakers) in order to interpret them, “fake news” is now an established practice of the far right, as well as a political slur used to denigrate the work of mainstream (center and left-of-center) news organizations.
 ENGL 3161Chaucer I
 Whan that Aprill, amidst the other pandemic, strangers meet at a pub and tell stories . . .
19922 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (6 / 99) 20 / 20Elizabeth FowlerTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmNew Cabell Hall 107
 A series of quizzes and a paper built in stages. This class will read everything in the original Middle English! We'll be thinking about poetry and poetics and how the engine of language helps to produce experience for the reader.
 ENGL 3260Milton
 At the crossroads of antiquity and modernity
19881 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 28 / 30Rebecca RushTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amBryan Hall 235
 Click blue numbers at left for a full course description.
 In this course, we will investigate the political, religious, and poetic debates of seventeenth-century England by focusing on a poet and pamphleteer who inserted himself into many of the major controversies of the period. In addition to tracing Milton’s career as a poet from his earliest attempts at lyric poetry to his completion of his major works Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes, we will read selections from his controversial pamphlets, in which he advocated beheading the king, loosening divorce laws, and halting print censorship. We will debate about how to reconcile Milton’s radicalism with the more backward-looking aspects of his poetry and prose. (He consistently looked to ancient Greece and Rome as political and poetic models. He wrote in genres like the sonnet and the epic that were downright outmoded by the seventeenth century. And he often based his arguments for radical liberties on appeals to reason, truth, and temperance.) As we unravel the peculiar intellectual positions of a poet who stood at the crossroads of antiquity and modernity, we will also attend to what makes him distinctive as a poet, including his ear for the rhythms of verse and his dedication to producing lines that are thick with learned allusions, etymological puns, and interpretive ambiguities. No prior knowledge of Milton or the seventeenth century is required; the only prerequisite is a willingness to read slowly, attentively, and with a dictionary at hand.
 ENGL 3370Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Drama
19899 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 25 / 30Cynthia WallMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmDell 2 101
 This course will range over the vast goodly fields of Restoration and eighteenth-century drama: tragedies, she-tragedies, heroic, gothic, and colonialist, along with samples of other popular stage entertainments such as operas, adaptations, pantomimes, farces. We’ll poke into contemporary biographies of the principal actors and managers, acting manuals, descriptions of theatres, sets, and costumes, accounts of the audiences, and the rise of Shakespeare as a national icon. Core playwrights will include William Wycherley, Thomas Shadwell, Aphra Behn, William Congreve, Susanna Centlivre, George Lillo, Richard Cumberland, Oliver Goldsmith, Frances Burney, and Matthew Lewis. Added fun will be found in Nahum Tate’s happy version of King Lear (1688), Henry Fielding’s truly wonderful The Tragedy of Tragedies; or, The Life and Death of Tom Thumb the Great (1731), and Elizabeth Inchbald’s Lovers’ Vows (1798) (yes, the one in Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park).
 ENGL 3460Victorian Poetry
19945 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (7 / 99) 30 / 30Andrew StaufferTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmJohn W. Warner Hall 113
 An introduction to the British poets writing between 1832 and 1914, in the long envelope of Queen Victoria’s reign, with a preliminary glance at Romanticism (1780s-1820s) by way of background. Poetry by Tennyson, the two Brownings (Robert and Elizabeth, married), the two Rossettis (Dante and Christina, siblings), Hopkins, Emily Bronte, Housman, Arnold, Hardy, Yeats, and others, with a coda on poets of WWI. The goal of the course is a broad exposure to the kinds of poetry being written during the first century of general literacy and the mass distribution of print in Britain, in the wake and onrush of the political, philosophical, and industrial revolutions of the nineteenth century. This was a time when poetry mattered intensely to a wide swath of the British population, and when modern ideas of what poetry could be and do were being shaped. Course themes will include memory, the self, time, sexuality, language, art, the imagination, love, and death: something for everyone.
 ENGL 3540Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature
 Jane Austen and the Romantics
20007 002Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (14 / 99)30 / 30Mark EdmundsonTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmDell 2 100
 Jane Austen and the Romantics – ENGL 3___: We’ll begin this course by reading one, maybe two of Jane Austen’s novels. Then we’ll go on to compare her vision of life and writing with some Romantic visions. We’ll consider her in imaginary dialogues with Blake, Wordsworth, and Shelley. And we’ll also discuss her in connection with Emerson, a generally serene and affable writer who disliked Austen’s work and wasn’t reluctant to say so. Cornel West, the writer and political activist, says that Emerson and Austen are his favorite writers, though he recognizes the tension between them. Is it possible to bring Austen and Emerson into some kind of harmony? This question, and others like it, will lie at the center of the course. A shortish paper, a longer one, and maybe a presentation or two.
 ENGL 3560Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature
 Contemporary Jewish Fiction
19998 002Lecture (3 Units)Open11 / 30Caroline RodyTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmDell 2 101
 ENGL 3560 002 and 5559 003 Contemporary Jewish Literature Spring 2023 In this course we will explore a literature positioned between tradition and modern invention, between the spiritual and the mundane, and—as Saul Bellow once put it—between laughter and trembling, in the emotionally rich territory where Jewish people have lived a spirited, talkative, politically engaged, book-obsessed modernity in the face of violence and destruction. We will read mainly Jewish American texts but also some by Jewish writers from other countries, taking up short stories, essays, poems, jokes, Broadway song lyrics, and a few complete novels, as well as short videos clips and a film, surveying a diverse array of modern Jewish literary and popular cultural production. About the first third of the course examines early and mid-twentieth century Jewish American writers, some from the immigrant New York milieu like Abraham Cahan, Mary Antin, Henry Roth, Isaac Bashevis Singer, and immigrant Yiddish poets (in translation), and then heirs to Yiddish culture with bold American aspirations, such as Delmore Schwartz, Alfred Kazin, Grace Paley, Chaim Potok, Bernard Malamud, Elie Wiesel, Philip Roth, Cynthia Ozick, and Lore Segal. For the rest of the term we will read fiction from the booming field of contemporary Jewish fiction, including authors such as Art Spiegelman, Allegra Goodman, Nathan Englander, Jonathan Safran Foer, Nicole Krauss, Michael Chabon, Joshua Cohen, Christophe Boltanski, David Bezmozgis, and Etgar Keret. The course will focus on the ways writers shape and reshape a new literature with roots in a formidable textual, cultural, and religious tradition. We will observe an evolving relationship to Jewish religious practice and to traditional Jewish texts, to Yiddish and the culture of Yiddishkeit; to memory and inheritance as burdens or as creative touchstones, to humor as an imaginative force. We will also consider changing conceptions of Jewish identity, of American identity, and of gender roles; the transformations wrought by assimilation and social mobility; socialist, feminist and other political commitments and visions; forms of engagement with history including the Holocaust, the founding of Israel and its ongoing conflicts; and life in multiethnic America. Requirements: reading, active class participation, co-leading of a class discussion, multiple short reading responses, a short and a long paper.
 ENGL 3840Contemporary Disability Theory
19937 001SEM (3 Units)Open 29 / 30 (29 / 30)Christopher KrentzMoWeFr 12:00pm - 12:50pmClark Hall 102
 Over the last several decades, thinking about people with physical, cognitive, and sensory differences has moved from a mostly pathological medical-based understanding to a more rights-based framework, although both models persist and overlap. In this course we will consider how conceptions of disability have (or have not) changed, considering such matters as how a disability is defined; disability in American history; autism and neurodivergence; deaf culture and medical interventions; disability and race, gender, class, and sexual orientation; and much more. The class will also consider how these theories relate to the depiction of disabled people in literature and film. Possible texts include Goffman’s Stigma; Wells’ “The Country of the Blind”; Coetzee’s Waiting for the Barbarians; Desai’s Fasting, Feasting; Nussbaum’s Good Kings, Bad Kings; Novic’s True Biz; and the films Unrest and Crip Camp. The class will feature a range of learning strategies, from whole-class discussion to smaller-group discussion to short lectures. Requirements will include two papers, quizzes, and active informed participation.
 ENGL 4500Seminar in English Literature
 Gothic Forms
19900 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (5 / 99) 18 / 18Cynthia WallMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmDell 1 104
 Gothic literature burst onto the scene in the eighteenth century with ruined castles, ethereal music, brooding villains and surprisingly sturdy heroines, all performing as metaphors of our deepest fears and fiercest resistances. Throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries the gothic continued as a genre of cultural anxiety. This seminar will survey gothic literature through both history and genre: the classic novels, Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto (1764), Matthew Lewis’s The Monk (1797), Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818), Robert Louis Stevenson’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886), Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House (1959), and Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey (1818); 18thC German vampire poetry and poems by John Keats, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Robert Browning, Christina Rossetti, and Sylvia Plath; the plays of Matthew Lewis and Richard Brinsley Peake; and the short stories of Edgar Allan Poe, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, W. W. Jacobs, Richard Matheson, and Stephen King. And we will ask ourselves: What are we afraid of?
 Milton and Whitman
20236 002SEM (3 Units)Wait List (1 / 99) 18 / 18Mark EdmundsonTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 594
 We’ll read with care and imagination what are perhaps the two greatest long poems in English, John Milton’s Paradise Lost and Walt Whitman’s Song of Myself. Both are works of palpable genius, but of very different kinds. Milton’s poem is committed to hierarchy, order and degree. In his cosmos, justified subordination and command are the highest ideals.(Though he is constantly challenging those ideals.) His world at its best is firmly and yet in its way flexibly ordered. He is a brilliant exemplar of true conservatism. Whitman is much different. “Unscrew the locks from the doors / Unscrew the doors themselves from their jams,” Walt chants. Whitman wants to dissolve all needless boundaries in the interest of perfect democratic equality. He wants to undo the barriers between old and young, rich and poor, women and men. And he does so, at least imaginatively, in Song. We’ll read the poems for what they are in themselves. But we’ll also consider them as brilliant exemplars of the progressive mind and its conservative counterpart. Students may be surprised as to where they fall in this mapping. With any luck, we’ll find ourselves, in the words of the Whitmanian, Wallace Stevens, “more truly and more strange.” A mid-term paper, a final essay, and some short writing assignments.
 Sally Hemings University
20633 003SEM (3 Units)Permission 7 / 14Lisa WoolforkTu 5:30pm - 8:00pmJohn W. Warner Hall 110
 This course is Sally Hemings University Connecting Threads. A community-engaged version of a previous incarnation, Sally Hemings University. The course explores questions generated by re-framing “Mr. Jefferson’s University” (and universities generally) as a site that destabilizes the dominant narrative of the university as Jefferson’s primary property and by extension that of similarly entitled white men. Sally Hemings, an enslaved girl, exercised the full extent of her limited agency to craft a legacy of liberation for her descendants. Taking Hemings’ role as an enslaved seamstress seriously, Sally Hemings University Connecting Threads interrogates the ways in which aesthetic practices (art, craft gestures) can operate within and alongside liberatory strategies.
 ENGL 4520Seminar in Renaissance Literature
 John Donne and Edmund Spenser
 Dig into the verse of two knotty, ardent, idiosyncratic poets
19882 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (4 / 199)18 / 18Rebecca RushTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmBryan Hall 330
 Click blue numbers at left for a full course description
 The aim of this course is to illuminate what is distinctive about the mental and poetic habits of two Renaissance poets by reading them side by side. If you have met these two poetic characters, you may have been struck by their differences rather than their similarities. Spenser’s intricately fashioned allegorical tales of love-lorn shepherds, wandering knights, and subtle sorcerers seem far removed from Donne’s metaphysical lyrics with their witty rants and far-flung conceits. In our close study of well-known and less-known works, we will consider the correspondences as well as the incongruities between these two poets, attending in particular to their ideas about the best way to body forth passions in poetic language, to their visions of excess and measure, to their understandings of the relation between religious and amorous devotion, and to their accounts of the reign of mutability in the world. No prior knowledge of Donne or Spenser is required or expected; the only prerequisite is a willingness to read with attention—and a dictionary.
 ENGL 4559New Course in English Literature
 The Bible Part 2: The New Testament
20737 002Lecture (3 Units)Open15 / 18John ParkerMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmBryan Hall 334
 The stories, rhythms, and rhetoric of the Bible have been imprinting readers and writers of English since the seventh century. Moving through much of the New Testament, from the Gospels to Revelation, this course focuses on deepening biblical literacy and sharpening awareness of biblical connections to whatever members of the class are reading in other contexts. Along the way we will discuss English translations of the New Testament; the process of canonization; textual history; and the long trail of interpretive approaches, ancient to contemporary. Our text will be the New Oxford Annotated Bible, 5th ed. All are welcome. No previous knowledge of the Bible is needed or assumed. It can be taken before or after the Bible Part 2: The Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, taught by Professor Stephen Cushman.
 ENGL 4560Seminar in Modern and Contemporary Literature
 Global Speculative Fiction
 Global Speculative Fiction
19902 002SEM (3 Units)Open8 / 18Debjani GangulyTu 3:30pm - 6:00pmNew Cabell Hall 411
 The course will explore the emergence of speculative fiction as a global literary form in our contemporary age. Broadly encompassing the genres of fantasy, science fiction, horror and alternative history, speculative fiction is any kind of fiction that creates a narrative world which may or may not resemble the world we live in. This kind of fiction embodies alternative ideas of reality including magic, space or time travel, alternative realities, or alternative histories. In recent years, there has been a proliferation of speculative fiction from Africa, Latin America, and the Asia Pacific that figure alternative futures for peoples oppressed by centuries-long colonialism. The rapid proliferation of digital technology and the accelerating effects of anthropogenic climate change have given a new edge to this body of fiction. We will study the emergence of counter-factual utopian and dystopian narratives, Afrofuturism and animism, the specter of fossil futures, and apocalyptic fiction on environmental collapse through a range of exciting works. The goal of this course is to understand the rise of speculative fiction as a literary form and a mode of world-making that captures cataclysmic shifts in human and non-human worlds that can no longer be comprehended by social, political, and moral frameworks of our recent past and present. Primary Texts Namwalli Serpell, The Old Drift (ISBN: 978-1-101-90714-6) Nnedi Okorafor Lagoon (ISBN: 978-1-4814-4088-2) Ruth Ozeki, A Tale for the Time Being (ISBN: 978-0-14-312487-0) Omar Elakkad, American War (ISBN: 978-1-101-97313-4) Kim Stanley Robinson, Ministry For The Future (ISBN: 978-0-316-30013-1)
 Literature and Imprisonment
20018 004SEM (3 Units)Open 9 / 18Sandhya ShuklaTu 3:30pm - 6:00pmNew Cabell Hall 415
 “Literature and Imprisonment” This course explores how imprisonment shapes the cultural imaginary. It seeks to understand how forms of containment, internment, incarceration, and more, can, paradoxically, give rise to expansive ideas about democracy, freedom and inclusion. Engaging in careful race and class analysis, we ask how, at various historical moments, the writings and other cultural works of political and non-political prisoners advance a rethinking of “America,” with abiding limits and possibilities. Materials to be covered may include fictional and non-fictional texts by Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston, Julie Otsuka, Chester Himes, James Baldwin, Malcolm X, Angela Davis, Leonard Peltier, Jimmy Santiago Baca, Viet Mike Ngo, and others; secondary sources by Michelle Alexander, Michel Foucault, Dylan Rodriguez and Caleb Smith will also be consulted. Though this is a mostly US-based course, we will also engage transnational and comparative perspectives, and students will be encouraged to pursue projects, if they so wish, on other parts of the world. Inasmuch as imprisonment raises social, economic, political and cultural questions, adopting an interdisciplinary sensibility which spans the social sciences and expressive arts will be crucial for our inquiry. Assignments include: regular weekly reading reflections, a 5-7 pp critical essay, and a 10-15 pp research paper.
 American Novels, American Controversies
20032 005SEM (3 Units)Open10 / 18Victoria OlwellTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amBryan Hall 203
 How do recent U.S. novels enter into contemporary political and social questions? As works of fiction, what particular expressive resources do novels bring public discourse? If novels seek to persuade readers to adopt a position, how do they do so? This course approaches such questions by considering novels alongside select contemporary non-fiction. The novels in the course address such issues as climate change, mass incarceration, immigration, women’s status, and modern Native American identity. R In addition to reading novels and sources related to contemporary issues, we’ll also study the history and aesthetics of the novel. Course requirements will include two 7-page papers, a final exam, and energetic class participation.
 ENGL 4580Seminar in Literary Criticism
 Critical Race Theory
20031 001SEM (3 Units)Closed18 / 18 (18 / 18)Marlon RossTh 5:00pm - 7:30pmNew Cabell Hall 064
 What does race mean in the late 20th and early 21st century? Given the various ways in which race as a biological “fact” has been discredited, why and how does race continue to have vital significance in politics, economics, education, culture, arts, mass media, and everyday social realities? How has the notion of race shaped, and been shaped by, changing relations to other experiences of identity stemming from sexuality, class, religion, disability, multiculturalism, nationality, and globalism? This course surveys major trends in black literary and cultural theory from the 1960s to the present, focusing on a series of critical flashpoints that have occurred over the last several decades. These flashpoints include: (1) the crisis over black authenticity during the Black Power/Black Arts movement; (2) the schisms related to womanism (or women of color feminism), focused on Alice Walker’s novel The Color Purple and the Steven Spielberg film adaptation; (3) the debate over the social construction of race (poststructuralist theory); (4) the debate over queer racial identities, focused on two films, Cheryl Dunye’s The Watermelon Woman and Barry Jenkins’ 2016 film Moonlight; (5) the theory and critique of post-racialism; (6) mass incarceration and the prison abolition movement; and (7) the aesthetic movement called Afrofuturism. Other reading will include a variety of theoretical essays and chapters drawn from different disciplines, including legal theory, film and media studies, sociology, history, and political theory. While concentrating on theories of race deriving from African American studies, we’ll also touch on key texts especially from Native American and Chicanx studies. The goal of the course is to give you a solid grounding in the vocabulary, key figures, concepts, debates, and discursive styles comprising the broad sweep of theoretical race studies from the late-twentieth century to the present, and to nurture your own theorizing about race and its deep cultural impact.
 ENGL 5060The Sonnet Revised and Revisited
 Click blue number to the left for full course description.
20441 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (6 / 99) 18 / 18Clare KinneyTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmBryan Hall 332
 Sonnets: their delights, their transformative practices, and their multifarious agendas, from the 16th century to yesterday.
 “A chamber of sudden change”; “a meeting place of image and voice”; “a game with mortal stakes”; “the collision of music, desire and argument”: these are some of the ways that poets and critics have described the sonnet. Starting with the Petrarchan experiments of Renaissance Europe and extending our reach through the Romantics and the modernists to Ted Berrigan, Seamus Heaney, Carol Ann Duffy, Terrance Hayes and beyond, we will consider the persistence and the many metamorphoses of the form. Sonnet writers construct a “a moment’s monument” for religious, political, philosophical and meta-poetical purposes as well as to anatomize desire, and when they present sonnets in sequence they make lyric do something of the work of narrative. Every time a sonnet is written, its author becomes part of a very long literary conversation and may make that intervention the occasion to set thought and feeling in a new dialogue, to reconsider “the contradictory impulses of being in the world,” to talk back to tradition, to make the dead speak again, to re-make and re-break the rules of form. Exploring the history, poetics and the race and gender politics of this tenacious short form, we will consider the craftiness of craft and the particular power of “bound language.” In addition to addressing a wide selection of sonnets written from the 16th century to yesterday, we will also read critical writings on the sonnet by a variety of scholars and poets. Requirements: lively participation in discussion; a series of email responses to readings, one 6-7 page paper; a presentation on a contemporary sonnet of your own choice; a substantial final project (critical or hybrid creative-critical).
 ENGL 5559New Course in English Literature
 Contemporary Jewish Fiction
19999 003SEM (3 Units)Open9 / 15Caroline RodyTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 066
 ENGL 5559 003 Contemporary Jewish Literature Spring 2023 In this course we will explore a literature positioned between tradition and modern invention, between the spiritual and the mundane, and—as Saul Bellow once put it—between laughter and trembling, in the emotionally rich territory where Jewish people have lived a spirited, talkative, politically engaged, book-obsessed modernity in the face of violence and destruction. We will read mainly Jewish American texts but also some by Jewish writers from other countries, taking up short stories, essays, poems, jokes, Broadway song lyrics, and a few complete novels, as well as short videos clips and a film, surveying a diverse array of modern Jewish literary and popular cultural production. About the first third of the course examines early and mid-twentieth century Jewish American writers, some from the immigrant New York milieu like Abraham Cahan, Mary Antin, Henry Roth, Isaac Bashevis Singer, and immigrant Yiddish poets (in translation), and then heirs to Yiddish culture with bold American aspirations, such as Delmore Schwartz, Alfred Kazin, Grace Paley, Chaim Potok, Bernard Malamud, Elie Wiesel, Philip Roth, Cynthia Ozick, and Lore Segal. For the rest of the term we will read fiction from the booming field of contemporary Jewish fiction, including authors such as Art Spiegelman, Allegra Goodman, Nathan Englander, Jonathan Safran Foer, Nicole Krauss, Michael Chabon, Joshua Cohen, Christophe Boltanski, David Bezmozgis, and Etgar Keret. The course will focus on the ways writers shape and reshape a new literature with roots in a formidable textual, cultural, and religious tradition. We will observe an evolving relationship to Jewish religious practice and to traditional Jewish texts, to Yiddish and the culture of Yiddishkeit; to memory and inheritance as burdens or as creative touchstones, to humor as an imaginative force. We will also consider changing conceptions of Jewish identity, of American identity, and of gender roles; the transformations wrought by assimilation and social mobility; socialist, feminist and other political commitments and visions; forms of engagement with history including the Holocaust, the founding of Israel and its ongoing conflicts; and life in multiethnic America. Requirements: reading, active class participation, co-leading of a class discussion, multiple short reading responses, a short and a long paper.
 Writing Self and Other: Formally Inventive Memoir
20970 005SEM (3 Units)Permission15 / 12Jane AlisonFr 2:00pm - 4:30pmBryan Hall 233
 Unless you are in the MFA or APLP program, instructor permission is required. Please send a note saying who you are and why you're interested in this course, along with a brief (10-page max) creative-writing sample, to Jane Alison at jas2ad.
 In this studio-seminar we’ll explore some arts of memoir, especially formally inventive memoir. How do memoirists find shapes in the flows of life? How do they choose the moments and images that reveal patterns that in turn give meaning to experience? How do they create the “I” that will see and translate what’s seen, and how do they know what is “true” and find ways to render it meaningfully? How, above all, do they transform the private to public, transmute life to art? These and other fundamental questions of persona, shape, time, and sense will engage us all term—as will some exciting refusals to craft memoir with such questions in mind. We’ll focus particularly on narratives that employ both reflection and deflection to find and create truths, and narratives that are formally inventive, in order both to look and look away. Readings might include works by Annie Ernaux, Jesse Ball, Maggie Nelson, Marie Ndiaye, Anne Carson, Michael Ondaatje, Kazim Ali. Alongside this reading, you will write and workshop your own memoir projects, which might be several essays, a series of linked fragments, or a single extended work.
 ENGL 5830Introduction to World Religions, World Literatures
 THE BIBLE
19884 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (7 / 199) 15 / 15Stephen CushmanWe 10:00am - 12:30pmDawson's Row 1
 The stories, rhythms, and rhetoric of the Bible have been imprinting readers and writers of English since the seventh century. Moving through selections from the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament, from Genesis to Revelation, this course focuses on deepening biblical literacy and sharpening awareness of biblical connections to whatever members of the class are reading in other contexts. Along the way we will discuss English translations of the Bible; the process of canonization; textual history; and the long trail of interpretive approaches, ancient to contemporary. Our text will be the New Oxford Annotated Bible, 5th ed. All are welcome. No previous knowledge of the Bible needed or assumed.
 ENGL 5831Proseminar in World Religions, World Literature
 1 cred/zoom workshop for grads of all depts interested in literature & religion, auditors welcome!
19925 001SEM (1 Units)Permission 2 / 0 (2 / 0)Elizabeth FowlerFr 2:00pm - 3:00pmNew Cabell Hall 042
 This is a pass/fail seminar that meets most Fridays designed for all graduate students interested in the intersections among religions and literatures. This spring we'll have guest speakers, bring in our own work, discuss topics that interest the group, and generally support you in your own endeavors. This is not designed to pile more work on you, but to give you a kind of home base among the disciplines. We're on zoom to accommodate dissertators from afar. You're welcome! Email fowler@virginia.edu for more information.
 ENGL 8520Studies in Renaissance Literature
 Magic and Witchcraft in Early English Drama
19944 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (6 / 99)15 / 15John ParkerMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 407
 This course will begin by examining the place of magic in scripture and the ancient world, focusing especially on its overlap with religion, philosophy (particularly natural philosophy or science), and medicine. We will then move to medieval demonology, (particularly the writings of Augustine, Aquinas, and Caesarius of Heisterbach) in order to better understand the overlap in representations of witches, saints, and heretics after 1100. We will look specifically at the earliest version of the demonic pact in the legend of St. Theophilus, as depicted in a thirteenth-century French play by Rutebeuf, and at the trial of Jesus for witchcraft in the York cycle. The last half of the semester will be devoted to Renaissance demonology, English witchcraft trials, and the depiction of magic on the commercial London stage. Plays may include Marlowe's Doctor Faustus, Shakespeare's 1 & 2 Henry VI, Othello, Macbeth, King Lear, The Tempest, Jonson's Masque of Queens and The Devil is an Ass, Middleton's The Witch, Dekker, Ford, and Rowley's The Witch of Edmunton and Thomas Heywood and Richard Brome's The Witches of Lancashire. Throughout the course we will be particularly attuned to the so-called Entzauberungsprozeß or "process of disenchantment" that, Max Weber argues, began with the Hebrew Bible and ancient Greek philosophy. To what extent is the relationship between witchcraft and theater clarified by the history of magic as Weber, Lynn Thorndike, Henry Charles Lea, Keith Thomas, and Stuart Clark (among others) envision it?
 ENGL 8596Form and Theory of Poetry
 Cutting Up: Collage & Revolutionary Poetics
19970 001SEM (3 Units)Permission14 / 15Brian TeareTh 2:00pm - 4:30pmDawson's Row 1
 Poets, prosers, and scholars welcome.
 Collage is an early 20th-century technique that originated in the visual arts in France around 1910. In French, collage is derived from coller, which means “gluing,” but it’s always been about first cutting out/decontextualizing image or language and then pasting down/ recontextualizing it among other images or language. After its emergence as a technique in the paintings and works on paper of Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso, collage quickly moved into the technical vocabulary of writers and artists associated first with Dada and then with Surrealism, whose chief theorist and champion, André Breton, writes in the first “Manifesto of Surrealism” that “Everything is valid when it comes to obtaining the desired suddenness from certain associations…It is even permissible to entitle POEM what we get from the most random assemblage possible.” Surrealists viewed such randomness as a gateway to “the marvelous,” but the marvelous was largely a weapon: against dead convention, constraint, propriety, logic, boredom, etc. The marvelous, according to Breton, could, on the one hand, “push man to frightful revolts,” and on the other, offer “an artificial paradise” created by dream, desire, disruption, and the law of chance. This is the legacy Surrealist collage offers poets who come after: revolt and paradise, critique and aspiration, the overthrow of the status quo. As the Martinican author Suzanne Césaire writes in her essay, “1943: Surrealism and Us,” “when liberty is threatened throughout the world, surrealism…can be summed up with a single magic word: liberty.” Thus though Surrealist collage emerged from a deeply colonial and patriarchal culture, both Black and feminist poets have found its weaponization of the marvelous a powerful tool. “Colonial stupidity will be purified,” Suzanne Césaire claims, “Our value as metal, our cutting edge of steel, our amazing communions will be rediscovered.” This course will present a capsule survey of Surrealist collage and six of its revolutionary inheritors. We’ll begin with Breton, poet and painter Alice Paalen Rahon, and the Negritude poet Aimé Césaire before moving on to three mid-century American poets associated with the “New American Poetry” – Leroi Jones (later known as Amiri Baraka), John Ashbery, and Barbara Guest – and end with three contemporary poets – Ann Lauterbach, Douglas Kearney, and CAConrad – whose work repurposes Surrealism’s dual legacy of revolt and artificial paradise for feminist, queer, anticolonial, and purely aesthetic ends. Alongside the poetry of these nine poets, we’ll study manifestos, interviews, and statements of poetics in order to better understand the theories of making practiced by collage-based poets. Intertwined with this survey of the poetry and poetics of collage will be an experiential learning portion of the course, which will allow us to explore collage techniques literally – through poetics exercises with scissors and glue stick. Together we’ll explore the many iterations of collage over the past century, from Surrealist salvos to anticolonial visions to Camp cut-ups to feminist interventions, while slowly each of us will begin to develop and articulate our own personal version of collage poetics. The course will be capped off with a final portfolio containing a reflective poetics statement and a manuscript of collage-based work.
 ENGL 8810Criticism in Theory and Practice
 Forms of Marxism
19946 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (0 / 99)15 / 15Brad PasanekMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmBrooks Hall 103
 This course surveys major works of Marxist literary theory with an emphasis on theories of form and ideology. The core reading is Karl Marx’s Capital, which we will read carefully for the first two thirds of the semester, following lines of argument out into literary-critical applications. Thus, Marx’s account of commodity fetishism is followed by readings from Georg Lukács on reification and realism, Bertolt Brecht’s Verfremdungseffekt, and the Frankfurt School analysis of the culture industry. Marx’s account of machinery and work-day discipline leads on to Walter Benjamin on mechanical reproduction and Sianne Ngai on the gimmick; primitive accumulation brings out Frantz Fanon and Silvia Federici. Weekly reading assignments will also be paired with a packet of miscellaneous excerpts from eighteenth- and nineteenth-century literature. We’ll settle in at midterm for a reading of Walter Scott’s Waverley and Marxist interpretations of the novel. Later in the term we’ll turn to twentieth-century cinema: The Spook who Sat by the Door (1973), Jeanne Dielman, 23 quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (1975), and They Live (1988). This final third of the course turns our attention to social reproduction and the categories of race, gender, and sexuality. We’ll study efforts to amend and extend Capital: reading from W.E.B Dubois’ Black Reconstruction, Federici’s Caliban and the Witch, and Mario Mieli’s Towards a Gay Communism.
Entrepreneurship
 ENTP 1559New Course in Entrepreneurship
 Unlocking Social Media Superpowers
 Full title: Unlocking your social networking superpowers
20889 004Lecture (0.5 Units)Open11 / 50Steven JohnsonTBA TBA
 Class is entirely online and can be completed at your own pace. It is completely asynchronous. There is no class meeting time.
 Why do some online spaces just feel right, and others are a turn off? Do you want to help create and nurture positive online social interactions? This course will help you to understand why people join social networks; how platforms shape interactions; and, how you can facilitate positive, mutually beneficial online experiences. Unlock your social networking superpowers to help build and maintain a positive online presence.
Writing and Rhetoric
 ENWR 1506Writing & Critical Inquiry Stretch II
 Writing about Culture/Society
 Writing about Place, Identity, and Community. Click left on 10128 for brief description.
10128 004SEM (3 Units)Open 10 / 12Patricia SullivanTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmBryan Hall 203
 During the course of this semester, we will explore a variety of places and communities, such as classrooms, dorms, neighborhoods, hometowns, schools (high school, UVA), athletic teams, social groups, social media sites, cities, nations, prisons, refugee camps, and others. We’ll consider how the places we come from, have lived in, or visited, shape our identities, our sense of community and our sense of belonging (or not belonging).
 Writing about Culture/Society
 Writing about Place, Identity, and Community. Click left on 11300 for brief description.
11300 005SEM (3 Units)Open 2 / 12Patricia SullivanTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmBryan Hall 203
 During the course of this semester, we will explore a variety of places and communities, such as classrooms, dorms, neighborhoods, hometowns, schools (high school, UVA), athletic teams, social groups, social media sites, cities, nations, prisons, refugee camps, and others. We’ll consider how the places we come from, have lived in, or visited, shape our identities, our sense of community and our sense of belonging (or not belonging).
 ENWR 1510Writing and Critical Inquiry
 Writing about the Arts
 The Art of the Review: Writing About TV, Music, Visual Art, Film & More
19177 054SEM (3 Units)Wait List (4 / 6) 18 / 18Lucy CatlettMoWe 3:00pm - 4:15pmBryan Hall 330
 Before going to the movies or buying a new book, most of us will refer to websites like Good Reads and Rotten Tomatoes to determine whether or not the art is worth the cost and our while. But at their best, critical reviews can do more than determine the “worth” of any work of artistic endeavor; they may provide roadmaps into concept albums, renews the relevance of classics, identify how a work magnifies the cultural imagination, or dig into the root of why some narratives in our culture win while others lose. Over the course of the semester, we’ll have the opportunity to make insights of our own as we learn the art of writing cultural reviews. Just as one does when composing literature essays, a reviewer of any artistic expression strives to read (or watch, or listen to) a work closely; analyze and understand its context, and explain what is interesting and meaningful about it. At the same time, we as a class will broach broaching the existential questions that attend the art of the review: what does it mean to write about art? What responsibility do reviewers of all kinds have to the art that they are reviewing, or to their readers? Is everyone qualified to be a critic? Like the works of criticism we read, the papers students will produce will be poignant but short in length. Authors we may encounter over the semester include Zadie Smith, Jia Tolentino, Peter Schjeldahl, Emily Nussbaum, Maggie Nelson, Doreen St. Felix, Michiko Kakutani, Susan Sontag, and others.
 Writing about Culture/Society
 Writing about the Future (Click on section number link on the left to read more!)
12034 056SEM (3 Units)Wait List (1 / 6) 18 / 18Jeddie SophroniusMoWeFr 11:00am - 11:50amBryan Hall 310
 Pandemics, wars, rising sea levels, recession, metaverse—the world as we know it has been forever changed. What will remain, what will be obsolete? What autonomy do we have as individuals in a society where hyper-surveillance is the norm? What will the world look like when the world’s fossil fuel reserves run out in just a few decades? What will happen once all the corrals in oceans turn to stones? When the bees all die out? Have we destroyed our planet to the extent that it is unrepairable? Will metaverse be the new society? The focus of this course revolves around the understanding of key factors that are shaping our future and finding the roles we have to play to ensure we have the future that we want. Throughout the semester, we will keep up with international news that ranges from politics, the economy, to science and technologies that have the potential to impact many people's lives, be it for the better or worse. We will extensively read and watch speculative fiction and social commentary pieces.
 Writing about Culture/Society
 Writing about the Future (Click on section number link on the left to read more!)
12060 057SEM (3 Units)Wait List (2 / 6) 18 / 18Jeddie SophroniusMoWeFr 1:00pm - 1:50pmBryan Hall 312
  Pandemics, wars, rising sea levels, recession, metaverse—the world as we know it has been forever changed. What will remain, what will be obsolete? What autonomy do we have as individuals in a society where hyper-surveillance is the norm? What will the world look like when the world’s fossil fuel reserves run out in just a few decades? What will happen once all the corrals in oceans turn to stones? When the bees all die out? Have we destroyed our planet to the extent that it is unrepairable? Will metaverse be the new society? The focus of this course revolves around the understanding of key factors that are shaping our future and finding the roles we have to play to ensure we secure the future we want. Throughout the semester, we will keep up with international news that ranges from politics, the economy, to science and technologies that have the potential to impact many people's lives, be it for the better or worse. We will extensively read and watch speculative fiction and social commentary pieces.
 Writing about Culture/Society
 Writing about the Future (Click on section number link on the left to read more!)
12129 059SEM (3 Units)Wait List (0 / 6) 18 / 18Jeddie SophroniusMoWeFr 10:00am - 10:50amBryan Hall 310
 Pandemics, wars, rising sea levels, recession, metaverse—the world as we know it has been forever changed. What will remain, what will be obsolete? What autonomy do we have as individuals in a society where hyper-surveillance is the norm? What will the world look like when the world’s fossil fuel reserves run out in just a few decades? What will happen once all the corrals in oceans turn to stones? When the bees all die out? Have we destroyed our planet to the extent that it is unrepairable? Will metaverse be the new society? The focus of this course revolves around the understanding of key factors that are shaping our future and finding the roles we have to play to ensure we secure the future we want. Throughout the semester, we will keep up with international news that ranges from politics, the economy, to science and technologies that have the potential to impact many people's lives, be it for the better or worse. We will extensively read and watch speculative fiction and social commentary pieces.
 ENWR 2520Special Topics in Writing
 Writing the Memorial to Enslaved Laborers at UVA
Website  12447 004SEM (3 Units)Closed 17 / 16Kate KostelnikTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmBryan Hall 312
 In this writing course we’ll contribute to conversations of race and history at UVA through self-designed writing projects. The first part of the course will be an inquiry into the history of enslaved laborers at UVA and how the writers of the Declaration of Independence framed our country—particularly in terms of equality, individual liberty, and the institution of slavery— (texts: Danielle Allen’s Our Declaration, Sullivan’s Commission on Slavery and the University, excerpts from Nelson and Harold’s Charlottesville 2017, and excerpts from Nelson and McInnis’s Educated in Tyranny). Next, we will look at how writers speak back to silences and suppressed narratives (texts: Colson Whitehead’s Underground Railroad, Petrosino’s White Blood, and Sharpe’s In the Wake). Throughout the course, we’ll look at current conversations about racial justice at UVA and beyond as well as community responses compiled by the Institute for Engagement and Negotiation[1] (IEN) in designing and executing the Memorial to Enslaved Laborers[2].
 ENWR 3500Topics in Advanced Writing & Rhetoric
 Studies in Cultural Rhetorics
19196 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (1 / 10) 16 / 16Tamika CareyTu 6:00pm - 8:30pmWilson Hall 244
 Every culture has its own way of making meaning and communicating through persuasive means. Native American groups, for instance, have retained ceremonial customs and spiritual practices despite the conquests that have shaped this country. Queer communities, for example, have strategic ways that they use to make sense of the world and joy for themselves despite and in relation to heteronormativity. African-Americans, LatinX, and Asian Americans all have strategic language practices and social customs they use to fortify their collective identities and advocate for themselves amid historical hostility. Differently abled people have developed strategic ways of making their needs met despite design choices that disadvantage them. Individuals in this country’s working-class employ strategic techniques to advocate for themselves in challenging environments. This course will explore how these various cultural locations (e.g., race, ethnicity, gender, ability, sexuality) impact how people generate rhetorical practices to maintain community and resist social division. Our work will involve exploring a variety of contexts wherein these practices are made, learning methodologies for studying rhetorical production across media and modality, and tracking these practices and their historical developments. Ideally, this work will enrich how you understand and participate in real-world cross-cultural and intercultural communications in professional and public spheres as well as personal encounters. Projects are likely to include: a language and culture autobiography; a discussion-leading presentation; an annotated bibliography and introduction; and a final project presentation. Please direct questions to Dr Carey (tlc9ec@virginia.edu)
 ENWR 3740Black Women's Writing & Rhetoric
19200 001SEM (3 Units)Open 15 / 16Tamika CareyTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 107
 This course offers students a survey of the persuasive communication and writing strategies Black women have used towards the project of empowerment. We will explore how they use rhetoric as techne, or an art, to meet their needs, and rhetoric as a critical lens we can understand to critique literature, communication, discourse, and more. Texts may include: Jacqueline Jones Royster’s Traces of a Stream: Literacy as Social Change Among African American Women, Brittany Cooper’s Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower, Mikki Kendall’s Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women a Movement Forgot, and others. Projects are likely to include: a discussion leading presentation; an analytical essay, and a final project.
Enviromental Thought and Practice
 ETP 3559New Course in Environmental Thought and Practice
 Africulture: The African Roots of US Agriculture
20655 001Lecture (3 Units)Open8 / 10 (18 / 20)Michael Carter Jr.+1Tu 2:00pm - 4:30pmNew Cabell Hall 303
 Taught by Mr. Michael Carter, Jr. of Carter Farms; supported by Prof. Lisa Shutt
 Led by a practicing farmer-activist, (Michael Carter, Jr. of Carter Farms in nearby Orange County, VA) we will examine how principles, practices, plants, and people of African descent have shaped US agriculture and thus, the lives of all Americans. By examining a wide range of history, laws, attitudes, cultures and traditions, we will see how many US staple commodities and practices have their roots in Africa and observe cultural similarities between indigenous cultures around the world. While evaluating realities of today’s Black farmers and the innovations they devise to survive in a system stacked against them, we will look for solutions to an array of challenges in environmental and agricultural sciences faced by today’s Black farmers.
French
 FREN 3032Text, Image, Culture
12054 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (3 / 199) 15 / 15Amy OgdenTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amFrench House 100
 Contemplative Reading and Writing
 This section will explore ways of using contemplative practices to - become more observant of how French-speaking artists (authors, filmmakers, poets, etc.) communicate through diverse media; - rebalance writing habits to transform anxieties into productive energy; - discover the joys of reading in French and sharing one's enjoyment with others both orally and in writing.
 The Power of Literature/Literature as Power
11590 002SEM (3 Units)Wait List (0 / 199) 15 / 15Deborah McGradyTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmNew Cabell Hall 191
 This class will explore examples of poetry, theatre, and prose from the medieval to the modern that challenged the status quo -- whether by demanding change, revealing difference, or bearing witness to political and personal injustices. The selected authors are united across the centuries in the belief that literature has the power to better the world and the individual. Because these writers share in the conviction that it is not just what you say but how you say it that makes change possible, this course will be dedicated to learning how to appreciate the art of writing.
 FREN 3034Advanced Oral Expression in French
13100 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (2 / 199) 15 / 15Gladys SaundersTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 168
 FREN 3034 Advanced oral expression in French This advanced course in oral expression has two main objectives: to provide students an occasion to practice their oral French skills in a variety of communicative contexts; and to offer them the opportunity to learn and reflect on various aspects of French culture of interest to their French-speaking contemporaries. Topics for discussion will be determined largely by student interests but will likely include aspects of French education and family life; the arts (French music, architecture, museum exhibitions, dance, theatre, haute couture . . . ); Franco-American relations; immigrant contributions; sports; and business culture. All class resources (including articles from French newspapers and magazines, journals, videos, TV and radio) will be available online. Students will be graded on their engaged involvement in class discussions, their in-class presentations (individual and group), a final oral reflective exam, and an audio and/or video class project or contribution to a class web-journal. FREN 3034 is the only course on offer to emphasize exclusively the skill of speaking French (spontaneously and fluently). Course conducted entirely in French.
 FREN 3043The French-Speaking World III: Modernities
 Tradition and Innovation
13102 001SEM (3 Units)Open 10 / 18Claire LyuTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmPavilion VIII 108
 In this course, we will reflect upon some of the key questions that arise when we engage in the process of literary, artistic, or intellectual creation. How do we make something new out of what is old? How do we nurture singular originality in the face of mounting societal pressures to conform? How can we learn from the past without becoming subservient to it? By examining the works of modern and contemporary writers, artists, and intellectuals who engage in explicit dialogue with their predecessors, we will explore different ways in which tradition gives birth to innovation. We will read the French writer Colette who, in writing a memoir of her parents, comes to discover how her identity is shaped by what she has inherited from each of them; the French-Chinese writer Cheng who, elected to the French Academy, writes in a French imbued with Chinese language and thought; the Belgian-Rwandan musician Stromae who rewrites and performs in the 21stcentury, the aria of Bizet’s 19th-century opera, which, in turn, was inspired by a short story published earlier by Mérimée; and the Belgian philosopher Despret who revisits the thesis of human exceptionalism that undergirds Descartes’ philosophy of the 17thcentury by reapproaching it from the perspective of the multiple ethical, feminist, and ecological exigencies of our own century.
 FREN 3559New Course in French and Francophone Cultural Topics
 TBD
 Students’ Choice: The Goncourt Book Club
20763 001Lecture (1 Units)Wait List (2 / 199)18 / 18Ari Blatt+1Th 9:30am - 10:20amWilson Hall 244
 Discover what France is reading now, and make your mark on the literary scene, by discussing a selection of books nominated for one of France’s most prestigious literary awards, the Prix Goncourt. Then cast your vote for the French Embassy’s Choix Goncourt USA! The French Department invites students to earn one credit as they participate in a weekly reading group focused on the newest nominated Goncourt Prize novels. The reading list consists of 6 books, short-listed by the French Embassy for this year’s Choix Goncourt USA. Because UVA has been designated a Center of Excellence by the Embassy (along with Duke, Princeton, Yale, Harvard, and NYU), our students have been invited to participate in this opportunity to engage with contemporary French and Francophone literary creation and to make their voices heard as they cast a vote that will determine who wins this year’s Choix Goncourt USA. After reading and discussing the six books during our weekly meetings, students will elect one representative to present the group’s top choice at a festive awards ceremony at the Villa Albertine in New York in April. The Department of French will fund travel and lodging for the student representative’s trip. Details: The six books will be provided to enrolled participants free of charge. Students will be guided to read two of the six books over winter break, then one each month during spring semester. The reading experience is designed to allow students to lead discussion, establish criteria for evaluating the books, and designate a representative to attend the ceremony in New York. Faculty facilitators: Professor Ari Blatt (ajb6f) and Professor Cheryl Krueger (clk6m) Reading and discussion in French. One credit. Counts toward the French major and minor. Prerequisite: FREN 3032 or equivalent placement or proficiency. Profs. Blatt and Krueger will hold an introductory meeting for all pre-enrolled participants on Weds. Nov. 16 at 5:15 in NHC 349 (French Dept. Conference Room).
 FREN 3584Topics in French Cinema
 Introduction to French Cinema
19337 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (2 / 199) 18 / 18Alison LevineTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmNau Hall 142
 **N.B. 3032 is not a prerequsite; may be taken concurrently with FREN 3032**
 This class provides an introduction to masterpieces of French cinema, from the earliest short films of the Lumière Brothers and George Meliès, to feature-length works by Godard, Marker, Truffaut, and Varda, as well as contemporary directors. Students will study film genres and movements (Poetic Realism, the New Wave) in relation to social, cultural and aesthetic trends. They will identify and analyze film techniques (camera angle, camera movement, montage, and more). They will discuss French cinema’s place in an international and transnational conversation about cinema, and explore questions such as: What is “French” about French cinema? What does it do well? Where has it failed? What has it taught us about France—about cinema—and about ourselves? Students will view approximately one film/week, outside of class, complete accompanying reading assignments, participate in class discussion, write analytical papers, and create original audiovisual material. Counts toward the French major or minor. All reading, writing, viewing, and discussion is in French.
 FREN 3585Topics in Cultural Studies
 Americans in Paris
19146 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 7 / 18Gladys SaundersTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmNew Cabell Hall 287
 FREN 3585 - Americans in Paris. Paris has always attracted Americans. This course (inspired by David McCullough’s book, The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris) studies the remarkable experiences of celebrated, as well as forgotten Americans (inventors, artists, writers, diplomats, medicals, etc.) who traveled to Paris in search of professional betterment, and their interactions with the people, the city and the cultural changes going on around them. Strong emphasis placed on oral communication skills. Requires active class participation and research. Readings from the McCullough book will be in English, but other assigned readings, discussions, lectures, oral presentations, films and writing will be in French. A day trip to the National Gallery of Art in Washington to view the celebrated work of one of America’s finest sculptors (who developed his exceptional talent during his stay in Paris) is planned. Course conducted in French. TR 12:30 – 13:45 (Saunders)
 Suspense
19129 002Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (4 / 199) 18 / 18Cheryl KruegerTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 287
 An exploration of suspense stories in a variety of text and film genres, with a focus on how narrative elements (pace, perspective, foreshadowing, plot structure, cliffhangers) and the manipulation of sound and images create expectation and tension. How does suspense work, and how does solving the puzzles of detective stories, true crime podcasts, and historical mysteries relate to coping with uncertainty and ambiguity in real life? Assignments include short essays, in-class presentations, online postings, and a final creative writing or multi-media project. Pre-requisite FREN 3032 or equivalent Language of instruction: French
 FREN 4585Advanced Topics in Cultural Studies
 Getting Medieval on the Movies
19133 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 9 / 18Amy OgdenTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmNau Hall 241
 Why isn’t Jamie Foxx cast as Robin Hood, or Zoe Saldana as Lancelot, or Michelle Yeoh as Merlin? When we’re dealing in myths, why do some ideas of “historical realism” seem to matter... and how sure are we that we know what medieval European society really looked like? When we imagine the world of over a thousand years ago, why do 1950s (or even 21st-century) race and gender dynamics so often structure it? Why does it matter how we retell important myths in popular culture anyway? Writers and artists of the Middle Ages often didn’t share our worries about historical accuracy in representation and gave us the lasting legacies of a white Jesus and a pink-cheeked Virgin Mary—even if regional alternatives in fact existed with various degrees of cultural (in)sensitivity. What legacies are we passing down to future generations in our retellings of stories about Robin Hood, the Holy Grail, and Lancelot’s illicit love for Guenevere? Who benefits from perpetuating a singular image of the Middle Ages? Is there a future for different ways of using these stories, as in the work of French rapper Black M or American artist S. Ross Browne? This class will look at such stories as told in medieval French texts (in modern French translation) and modern stage and screen adaptations, such as the 2012 musical “Robin des Bois” and classics like Rohmer’s 1964 Perceval. For cultural contrast, we may also examine a few Anglo adaptations (like Monty Python and the Holy Grail / “Spamalot,” Black Knight, and the 2018 Robin Hood). No previous study of film required.
 Love, Sex, Marriage, Friendship in Renaissance
19134 002Lecture (3 Units)Open 13 / 18Gary FergusonTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmNau Hall 241
 If passions and emotions are part of human nature, the forms they take and the ways in which they are and can be expressed vary greatly over time and between cultures. How were love, sex, marriage, and friendship understood and lived in sixteenth-century France – in each case between members of the opposite sex and the same sex? How did they evolve in this pivotal period of transition between the Middle Ages and the modern world? How were they inflected by intellectual, social and cultural movements such as the Reformation, Humanism, developing notions of the individual, and ongoing debates about the nature of women? Through the study of a combination of contemporary texts and modern films, we will explore a fascinating culture, at once similar to and different from our own – one whose stories (like that of Romeo and Juliet) still speak to us today and with whose legacy we live and continue to grapple.
 Animals in a Posthuman World
19333 003Lecture (3 Units)Open 14 / 18Claire LyuTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmPavilion VIII 108
 This course presents students with a number of leading contemporary French thinkers who, through their innovative, posthuman, ecocritical reassessment of the human-animal relationship, challenge the long-standing Western bias of human exceptionalism. In the first part of the course, we will investigate how Western culture has come to proclaim the idea of human exceptionalism. How does the West construct the difference between humans and nonhuman animals? What parts do religion, philosophy, and science play in constructing models of human-animal divide and/or closeness? In the second part of the course, we will explore the limits of the Western perspective: first, by examining non-Western approaches to human-animal relation; and second, by reflecting on how climate change and the pandemic bankrupt such an anthropocentric worldview and situate us in a posthuman world. We will examine works in a wide range of fields (anthropology, history, philosophy, animal studies, literature, film, art, children’s literature) and practices (domestication, training, farming, experimentation, zoo, rescue/rehabilitation) in order to embark on a collective exploration as to how we can shift from an anthropocentric to an ecological worldview and practice a more equitable posthuman way of sharing our fragile life with all species on the Earth. Authors may include Baratay, Derrida, Descartes, Descola, Despret, Haraway, Hearne, Heidegger, Latour, Pennac, Porcher. In addition to films, we will also look at youtube videos/ podcasts on dog and horse training.
French in Translation
 FRTR 3559New Course French Cultural Topics
 Black France Musicscape: Race, Space, Gender
19331 001SEM (3 Units)Open 8 / 18Rashana LydnerTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmWilson Hall 238
 This interdisciplinary course examines the impact of music and language use in the Black Francophone world. Through an examination of various texts, music and music videos from genres such as coupé décalé, ndombolo/soukous, afro beats, pop, hip hop/ rap, zouk, dancehall and reggae, students will explore, think critically, and discuss issues on cultural expression from multilingual communities in West and Central Africa, the French Caribbean, and mainland France. We will engage with key terms such as the Black Atlantic, la francophonie, authenticity, creolization, globalization, and multilingualism and ask: What role does popular culture play in creating spaces of liberation for the Black Francophone diaspora? And what are the connections that both language and music encourage in the Black francophone diaspora and the larger Black diaspora? Throughout the semester, we will think about the importance of race, space, gender and language in the formation of a Black France Musicscape.
Graduate Commerce
 GCOM 7214Managerial View of AI
20304 001Lecture (3 Units)Open, WL (1 / 199) 39 / 40Steven JohnsonTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amRobertson Hall 225
 Artificial Intelligence (AI) combines algorithms in complex, data-driven ways with difficult-to-predict outcomes. It has become an essential yet largely invisible component of our modern global society. All across the world, AI allows for the automation of business rules, policies, and decision-making at a large scale. Through identification of and reflection on how personal values and societal values relate to those embedded in AI deployments, students will be able to articulate the potential benefits and harms of AI technology to individuals, organizations, and global society. Students will learn about various applications of AI, including marketing, management, life sciences, government policy, education, and transportation. Topics include how to manage AI, ethical frameworks, types and sources of algorithmic bias, guidelines for responsible use of AI, and accountable autonomy. The course is primarily based on readings, research, and discussion (80%) and also incorporates using low-code AI solutions (20%) to analyze how the source and quality of data sources impact AI bias and performance. The course includes both individual and team-based assignments.
German
 GERM 3559New Course in German
 German Phonetics and Pronunciation
19851 001Lecture (3 Units)Open4 / 18Christina NeuhausMoWe 5:00pm - 6:15pmNew Cabell Hall 364
 In this class, we will look at how sounds are produced and organized in the German language. We will use this knowledge to improve our own pronunciation, focusing on areas of particular difficulty for U.S. speakers. By looking at how sounds connect across phrases and analyzing intonation, we will also create more fluent and native-like patterns of speech. By the end of this class, you will be able to analyse sounds and speech patterns, explain how sounds are produced, read and transcribe phonetic transcription, design and assess pronunciation exercises, discuss the sociolinguistic impacts of pronunciation, and critically reflect upon your own journey in German pronunciation.
Global Studies-Global Studies
 GSGS 3559New Course in Global Studies
 Ecological Economics
 Economics as if People AND the Laws of Thermodynamics Mattered
20342 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 18 / 30Spencer PhillipsTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amNew Cabell Hall 168
 aka GSGS 3330 (new number recently assigned)
 Ecological Economics augments standard economics, especially natural resource and environmental economics, by stressing the interdependence and coevolution of natural systems with human institutions, including markets and other means of allocating economic resources. The transdiscipline elevates concerns for “sustainable scale” and “just distribution” to an equal footing with “allocative efficiency” as worthwhile (and indeed essential) societal goals. In this course, students examine these fundamental relationships, rooted in ecology and human behavior, and the consequences of those relationships as realized in current local and global agricultural, natural resource, environmental, and development issues. The course complements a standard course of study in economics and, for students who might take only one economics course, provides an overview (and then some) of the field.
 1492 and Beyond
 1492 and Beyond
20343 002Lecture (3 Units)Open 5 / 30Robin GarciaMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmJohn W. Warner Hall 110
 This course examines the impact of Christopher Columbus’ voyage and the cultural shifts that it marked in Africa, Europe and the Americas from 1492 to the present. It also explores how Indigeneity and race have been constructed in relationship to European expansion through the study of primary and secondary source texts in a variety of disciplines, including art, literature, film, and history. We will consider how the so-called “encounter of the two worlds” altered geographic, social, and national borders and is framed in conversation with the idea of Latin America. As such we will look closely at the relationship between colonial processes and the construction of ideas that supported them. This course is divided in four broad phases: pre-Columbus; the encounter and conquest/invasion; the period of colonization; and nationhood and identity/and decolonial identities. In the second part of the course, we will delve into a comparative approach as it relates to what Latin American scholars have termed the other America, the United States, to examine notions of nationhood and identity in the Americas. We will take special note of current movements to re-write history especially in regards to contemporary challenges to historical monuments across the country by grassroots communities. As such, students will explore the legacy of the Conquest and histories of resistance that emerged as a response through texts that address notions of national identity, diaspora, hegemony, race, gender, and class.
Global Studies-Security and Justice
 GSSJ 3559New Course in Global Security and Justice
 Law Justice and Sustainable Development
 Law, Justice and Sustainable Development
19580 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 24 / 30Huong NgoTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 389
 On one level, the very definition of sustainable development is “meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs”, on another level, it is about intertemporal distributive justice. In this course, students will build their understanding of justice built on foundational principles applied in the context of sustainable development. They will also gain a working knowledge of the legal frameworks (national laws and international laws and treaties), and institutional and policy governance frameworks intended to spread, deepen, and defend justice in sustainable development, particularly from Global South experiences. We will also explore solutions to these challenges of sustainable development. We will examine United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights and International Labour Standards, for their potential to advance sustainability by advancing justice. Our goal is to equip thinkers, policy analysts, activists and communicators with the ability to influence and use these institutions to promote justice and sustainable ends.
Leadership and Public Policy - Substantive
 LPPS 3559New Course in Public Policy and Leadership
 Community-Based Research: Charlottesville Housing
16845 001Lecture (3 Units)Open7 / 13 (7 / 25)Paul MartinMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmClaude Moore Nursing Educ 1120
 This experiential-learning course is oriented toward learning and applying skills to help students better understand a policy problem at a community level. While we frequently describe problems at a national level, people experience problems and interventions are implemented in their local context, which has a mix of policy makers, NGOs, stakeholders, and history. The conundrum for policy-makers is that evidence of problems, interventions, and solutions are frequently too general and not precise enough to follow in a specific locality. The gap between national-level understanding and specific and contextualized experience creates a host of policy challenges. The class will take us out of the traditional classroom and into the community. The spring 2023 class will focus broadly on issues related to housing within the Charlottesville community.
 This experiential-learning course is oriented toward learning and applying skills to help students better understand a policy problem at a community level. While we frequently describe problems at a national level, people experience problems and interventions are implemented in their local context, which has a mix of policy makers, NGOs, stakeholders, and history. The conundrum for policy-makers is that evidence of problems, interventions, and solutions are frequently too general and not precise enough to follow in a specific locality. The gap between national-level understanding and specific and contextualized experience creates a host of policy challenges. The class will take us out of the traditional classroom and into the community. The spring 2023 class will focus broadly on issues related to housing within the Charlottesville community.
 LPPS 5720Public Interest Data: Ethics and Practice
 See the spring 2022 syallbus: https://data-ethics-practice.mclaibourn.org/
20440 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (0 / 199)18 / 18Michele ClaibournTh 3:30pm - 6:00pmPavilion VIII 103
 Our Spring 2023 project will expand on work to launch a database of Virginia court records. We will undertake some initial analysis of subsets of this data to create a series of policy-oriented data stories to accompany the database platform. These will serve as examples of the types of research the court data enables, provide models of reproducible analysis, and be an educational resource for others wishing to use the data platform for analysis and advocacy. We are particularly interested in developing analyses that will help justice-oriented organizations and advocates understand how his data can be used to understand outcomes and disparities in the civil or criminal judicial systems.
 This applied course provides exposure to data science within a framework of data ethics in service of equity-oriented public policy. We will use administrative (and other) data to answer pressing questions about policy outcomes with attention to the moral and ethical implications of our work. This includes (1) finding, cleaning, and understanding data, (2) exploring, analyzing, modeling data, and (3) visualizing, contextualizing, and communicating data-informed policy recommendations, with care and respect for the affected partners and communities throughout. We will be using the open-source R environment for our work. You don’t need to be an expert in statistics or R or visualization or coding, but do need to be interested in learning. The projects will provide opportunities to develop these skills further.
Mathematics
 MATH 8720Differential Geometry
12549 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 1 / 12Filippo MazzoliMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmKerchof Hall 317
 This course will mostly focus on the study of conformal and hyperbolic geometry in dimension 2. Through fairly elementary constructions, it is possible to see that any closed oriented surface S of genus larger than 1 admits uncountably many non-isometric hyperbolic metrics (or, equivalently, Riemann surface structures, by the Riemann Uniformization Theorem), and the set of their isomorphism classes, usually referred to as the “moduli space” of S, can be endowed with a natural topology, describing how “close” different hyperbolic/Riemann surface structures on S can be. The study of moduli spaces of Riemann surface structures is of great interest in many areas of mathematics: differential and algebraic geometry, low-dimensional topology, number theory, dynamical systems are just a few examples. As we’ll see, it is at times more convenient to look at the “universal cover” of the moduli space of S, usually called the “Teichmüller space” of S. This object carries in fact a wide variety of structures in addition to its topology. Indeed, it can be endowed not only with a structure of complex manifold of (complex) dimension 3g-3, but also with multiple natural notions of distances, RIemannian metrics, and symplectic structures. In the first part of this course, we will formally introduce the definition of Teichmüller spaces, possibly describing some of the approaches to its study (see e.g. the classical works of Teichmüller, Ahlfors, Bers, Weil, among others, and the more recent works of Thurston — and many others that followed — in more recent years), and investigate its properties. We will start by investigating the fine structure of Teichmüller space: its interpretation in terms of Beltrami differentials and quasi-conformal maps. We will see the description of its cotangent space as the bundle of holomorphic quadratic differentials, and discuss the properties of the Teichmüller distance, see that it is complete, and describe its geodesics. This first part, strictly connected to the conformal interpretation of Teichmüller space, will conclude with the description of the Bers’ holomorphic embedding and the notion of complex projective structures. Depending on the time available, we then have multiple directions of exploration. One option is to continue investigating additional notions of distances on Teichmüller space. This may include the introduction of the Weil-Petersson distance (and the discussion of its properties, for example the fact that it is part of a natural Kähler structure on Teichmüller space), or the Thurston asymmetric distance, and the relations between them. Another possible direction would be to relate what observed on Teichmüller space to the study of the space of quasi-Fuchsian 3-manifolds, discuss the interpretation of complex projective structures in this context and Thurston’s parametrization via locally convex pleated surfaces. This would lead us more towards the study of convex cocompact hyperbolic 3-manifolds. Another option is to discuss several alternative parametrizations of Teichmüller space, for instance via pants decompositions (by Fenchel and Nielsen), shear coordinates (by F. Bonahon), or harmonic maps (by M. Wolf). In general, the topics that we will be discussing are at the base of multiple current areas of research, and the directions listed above are just some of the options. I’d be happy to adapt the flow of the course and the topics that will be discussed depending on the general interests of the students that will participate.
Media Studies
 MDST 3559New Course in Media Studies
 Ukrainian Cinema: Evolution, Revolution & Ontology
20554 002SEM (3 Units)Open 2 / 30Patrick CribbenTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amNew Cabell Hall 309
 The very notion of Ukraine as a nation, a culture, and a people is under attack, quite literally. A century of Ukrainian cinema may provide a counterpoint to such efforts at nullification. We’ll examine Ukrainian cinema focusing on three critical historical periods: the first Soviet decade of 1921-1930 (Vertov, Dovzhenko); the Ukrainian “poetic cinema” of the Soviet “Thaw” of the 1960s and 70s (Parajanov, Muratova, Ilyenko et. al.); and the post-Independence (1990s-2000s) – and particularly the post-Maidan (2014 to the present) – resurgence of creativity and accomplishment among the county’s new and emerging filmmakers. Early on, we will briefly examine the history of Ukraine dating back to the Medieval period (and even prior) to contextualize and disentangle current claims both for and against its historical sovereignty and the continuity or discontinuity of it’s culture. We will get a chance to ask what exactly a “nation” is, or even a culture or a people; and we’ll look for ways such questions, and possibly answers, evince themselves in the cultural and artistic medium of film by way of both content and style. Our emphasis, though, will be on the films themselves, with particular weight to the last 10 or so years leading up to the present moment, as the country’s artists have struggled, and succeeded, to continue to express, define, and declare themselves even in a context of conflict, uncertainty and cultural denial from outside Ukraine’s borders. The syllabus is still under construction, but it may help you to know that grading for the class will consist of class participation, occasional short (1-page) response papers based on some of the films, a 5-page paper around midterms, and a 10-page paper as a final project in lieu of a Final Exam. Films still under consideration include (but are not limited to): Man with a Movie Camera (Vertov, 1929) Earth (Dovzhenko, 1930) A Well for the Thirsty (Ilyenko,, 1965) Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors (Parajanov, 1965) Brief Encounters (Muratova, 1967) The Long Farewell (Muratova, 1971) The White Bird Marked with Black (Ilyenko, 1971) The Asthenic Syndrome (Muratova, 1989) My Joy (Loznitsa, 2010) Maidan (Loznitsa, 2014) The Tribe (Slabosphytskyi, 2014) Ukrainian Sheriffs (Bondarchuk, 2015) Cyborgs (Seitablayev), 2017) Juliet Blue (Toporowych, 2018) Atlantis (Vasyonovych, 2019) My Thoughts are Silent (Lukich, 2019) Homeward (Aliev, 2019) The Earth is Blue and Orange (Tsilyk,, 2020) Reflection (Vasyanovych, 2021) Klondike (Gorbach, 2022) There will be no textbook for the course, but occasional assigned readings may come from offprints, articles, or chapters from such authors as historian Timothy Snyder, film historian Joshua First, film Critic Johnathan Rosenbaum, Ukrainian historian Ivan Rudnytsky, and Ukrainain film scholars Bohdabn Nebesio and Vitaly Chernetsky among others
Music
 MUSI 2090Sound Studies: The Art and Experience of Listening
12571 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (3 / 199) 20 / 20Noel LobleyMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmContact Department
 Class will meet in Wilson Hall 142
 When we think about knowing the world through the senses, we are likely to think first of the visible world. But sound, hearing and listening are crucial too and often take precedence in many communities. Recently scholars in history, anthropology, geography, literary studies, acoustics, music, ecology, environmental science, and art have come together in the field of Sound Studies, reflecting on the role of sounds as forces that flow in and beyond human life. How do sound art, technology, and design create the world we inhabit and our everyday social and political experience? How can vibrations both heal and destroy? What does it mean to experience immersive and embodied sound? We will ponder these and other questions, moving between theoretical, experiential, and creative explorations. Please note: this course is an introduction to Sound Studies, there is no pre-requisite, and students from all backgrounds, levels and experiences are welcome to come and explore myriad ways to engage with sound.
 MUSI 3380Introduction to Composition
Website  20637 100Lecture (3 Units)Open 14 / 20Michele ZaccagniniTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amOld Cabell Hall B012
 for more info email Michele: mz3vq@virginia.edu
 This course focuses on composing short pieces for solo instrument, keyboard and small ensembles. One of the compositions assigned will be a movie scene to be scored. Elements such as melodic and harmonic design, orchestration, and voice leading will be covered. The course starts with a refresher of tonal harmony and counterpoint, moving to the study of musical forms. Pre-compositional exercises (bass harmonization, and counterpoint) will accompany free compositions. The free compositions will be given extensive feedback in dedicated class sessions.
 MUSI 3390Introduction to Music and Computers
Website  13768 100Lecture (3 Units)Permission 35 / 25Michele ZaccagniniTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmOld Cabell Hall B012
 for more info email Michele: mz3vq@virginia.edu
 Introduction to Music and Computers is an upper-level introductory course in music technology. Students gain theoretical, historical and practical knowledge of electronic and computer music. An emphasis is placed on creative hands-on experience composing computer music. Theoretical topics include acoustics, recording, digital audio, MIDI, sound synthesis, and audio DSP. Students learn skills in sound-file editing, multitrack sound mixing, sound synthesis, and sound processing. This is a composition class and key assignments are creative in nature.
 MUSI 3510Music and Community Engagement I
 Amplified Justice Part 2
 Sound Justice as Community Engagement
Website  13773 001SEM (3 Units)Open 13 / 25Nomi Dave+1TuTh 9:30am - 10:45amContact Department
 This class explores connections between sound, listening, and the law. How do legal proceedings play out in sound? What does the law hear – and what does it not? What happens when legal systems fail? In exploring these and other questions and engaging in creative advocacy, student will directly engage with the Sound Justice Lab and its ongoing projects, relating to issues such as reproductive justice, defamation lawsuits against journalists, gender equity and refugees, and the use of rap lyrics as criminal evidence. Course materials include court cases and transcripts, music, film, novels, and academic articles. The class has a civic engagement component that offers students opportunities to work with lawyers, artists, and social justice practitioners in Charlottesville and beyond to produce research and creative work. It also provides a space to respond to and engage current events through individual and collective art making. The class can be used to fulfill the music major requirements, but musical or other artistic experience is not necessary.
 MUSI 4523Issues in Ethnomusicology
 African Electronic Music
 Electronic Music in Africa
Website  11869 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 9 / 15Noel Lobley+2MoWe 9:30am - 10:45amContact Department
 Class will meet in Wilson Hall 142. Please feel free to request instructor permission should SIS require it.
 In 2018, the renowned British music journal Fact boldly claimed that “the world’s best electronic music festival is in Uganda.” Indeed, African cities have long been places for some of the most futuristic music, sounds that reverberate between local identities and international avant-garde scenes. Explosive, hypnotic and ultra-modern electronic sounds meld stunning dance forms with musical theatre and fashion, articulating the urban youth experience in cities as diverse and vibrant as Johannesburg, Nairobi, Kinshasa, Lagos, Dar es Salaam, and Kampala. In this course, we will engage multiplex genres of electronic music from the African continent, including Congolese congotronics, Ugandan acholitronix, Tanzanian singeli, and South African shangaan electro and gqom apocalyptic bass music, paying close attention to innovations in artistic practice, remix culture and Afrofuturism. Blending critical and contextual work with exciting opportunities for real world outputs, we will be engaging with professional artists from different electronic scenes, such as the boiling Nyege Nyege collective and The Black Power Station, alongside other professional partners in music production and exhibition and museum curation. As a way to open professional avenues for students, we will all be working together with artists and curators to imagine, design and curate exhibition content in real and virtual spaces. No prior musical experience is required
 MUSI 4610Sound Synthesis and Control
 Sound Synthesis & Control: Designing New Musical Instruments
19807 001WKS (3 Units)Permission 10 / 10Luke DahlMoWe 11:00am - 12:15pmContact Department
 New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME) is a field that explores new ways of performing music with technology. NIME is interdisciplinary, incorporating perspectives from music, sculpture, engineering, human-computer interaction (HCI), and design. In this class we will learn the basic skills needed to design and build new musical instruments. We will implement real-time digital sound synthesis algorithms using the PureData visual programming language, which will run on the Bela embedded audio system. And we will use various electronics sensors to measure user’s gestures as input data. The class is primarily project-based, and we will prototype a number of new musical instruments and interactions. Students are expected to have experience using computers for music-making, such as MUSI 3390 or MUSI 2350. Experience with PureData or Max is beneficial but not required. Enrollment is by instructor permission. If you are interested please sign up on the list, and describe your background and/or interest. Feel free to email the instructor if you have any questions.
 MUSI 4620Audio Visual Environments
Website  20651 001WKS (3 Units)Wait List (5 / 199) 12 / 12Michele ZaccagniniMo 2:00pm - 4:30pmOld Cabell Hall B011
 email Michele for more info: mz3vq@virginia.edu
 This class explores the fundamentals of music visualization and VJ ing. This class will count as Integration Elective in Computer Science. The class is project oriented: students will create several audiovisual compositions such as connecting synthesizers to images, visualizing existing music and live performance (VJing) with MIDI interfaces. Students will be working on both 2D and 3D visuals using shader programming and the Unity game engine as tools. Fundamentals of music synthesis, algorithmic composition and parametrization of musical features will be covered. Some coding experience is encouraged but not required.
 MUSI 7509Cultural and Historical Studies of Music
 Syncopated Histories
 Syncopated Histories
20691 001Lecture (3 Units)Open4 / 10Bonnie GordonTh 2:00pm - 4:30pmOld Cabell Hall S008
 open to students from all departments
 This interdisciplinary graduate seminar in the Music Department considers history as a practice of entangled temporalities, inviting students from across departments to excavate the debris of the past and listen to the resonances between pre-modern and contemporary moments. What is the historical relationship between fiction and dis-information? How do scholars and artists create and transform originary myths? How do emotional and sensory responses effect the doing of history? How do we sound the past in our lives and work? How do different fields like legal history, cultural history, music history tell stories. The class begins by asking what it meant when the United States Supreme court overturned Roe v. Wade based in part on medical knowledge from a time when it was thought, for example, that listening to a string instrument made of the wrong animal products might cause miscarriage. We then will investigate the case study of the Italian castrato phenomenon that prefigures questions around gender, identity and body that are increasingly urgent today. We will look at ancient and medieval roots of the setter colonialism of Jamestown from the perspective of sound. Theoretical readings include Sylvia Wynter’s Unsettling, Kara Keiling’s Queer time/Black Temporalities, Jacques Derrida’s Archive Fever, and Elizabeth Freeman’s Time Binds. Students need not be in the Music Department or read music for this class. There will be ample time for students to pursue their own interests. Coursework centers on reading, writing, archival work in Special Collections, and listening. Students can create final projects that are relevant to their research or can explore other media.
 MUSI 7540Computer Sound Generation and Spatial Processing
  Composing for Music & Movement
19819 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed0 / 0Luke DahlWe 2:00pm - 4:30pmOld Cabell Hall B011
 There are many interesting connections between music and movement. Music and dance occur together in every human culture. When we listen to music we experience an abstract sense of movement, and we use movement metaphors to describe music and its movement. Musical instruments can be thought of as devices for transducing human movement into sound. In this class we will examine these relationships, we will study various technologies for measuring movement, and we will use these technologies to make music from movement and movement-based data. In particular we will explore how motion-capture can be used to generate musical sound in real-time, and we will work with dancers and other movers and performers to create new artistic works. This class is a seminar for graduate composers in the CCT program of the music department. However advanced undergraduates or other interested students may contact the instructor to discuss joining the class.
Politics-Comparative Politics
 PLCP 7500Special Topics in Comparative Politics
 Identity and the State
Website  18794 001SEM (3 Units)Open6 / 15Denise WalshTh 4:30pm - 7:00pmGibson Hall 142
 What is identity? How are identities made? What are some of the challenges and consequences of identity formation and identity politics? This course investigates these questions through comparisons of class, race, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, religion, and nation throughout the course. We begin with political science and its relationship with identity politics and discuss the shift at the turn of the 21st century from treating identity as a given to studying it as a process. The second section of the course considers four approaches to identity formation: neo-primordialism, instrumentalism, constructivism and constructionism. We then turn to two pressing challenges: how to measure identity and the relationship of identity groups to one another. The final section of the course addresses the consequences of identity politics, exploring how and why identity groups mobilize; violence, conflict, and war among identity groups; how identity politics shapes voting, representation, and public policy; and the relationship between identity politics and the recent rise of the Radical Right.
Religion-General Religion
 RELG 1500Introductory Seminar in Religious Studies
 Race and Religion in Virginia
13389 001SEM (3 Units)Open 5 / 20Kai ParkerWe 3:30pm - 6:00pmNau Hall 241
 This introductory seminar will explore how race and religion have together shaped the history and present of the Commonwealth of Virginia. Through reading and discussing both historical documents and recent scholarship on race and religion in Virginia, students will be introduced to various ways of examining and thinking about the role of religion in society. Topics will include the encounter between Native, European, and African people in Virginia during the early colonial period; the importance of religion to the legal construction of race; the relationship between the ideal of religious freedom and the institution of slavery; race and religion in the early history of the University of Virginia; religion and the coming of the Civil War; theologies of abolition and Jim Crow; the development of Black religion in Virginia; the civil rights movement; and the August 11-12, 2017 “Unite the Right” rally. The course will also provide students an introduction to issues central to UVA and Charlottesville.
Systems & Information Engineering
 SYS 2502Special Topics in Systems and Information Engineering
 The Practice of Systems Engineering
 What is Systems Engineering at UVA? A class for first-years considering majoring in Systems.
20895 001SEM (1 Units)Open21 / 60Reid Bailey+1Tu 4:00pm - 4:50pmThornton Hall E303
 What is systems engineering? If you are curious about Systems Engineering but want to learn more prior to declaring a major/minor, or if Systems Engineering concepts have peaked your interest, this 1-credit class is for you. Through a combination of speakers and hands-on activities, we will give you a taste of the many core parts and concepts of the Systems Engineering major at UVA.
 SYS 3502Special Topics in Systems and Information Engineering
 Introduction to Digital Solution Design
20896 001Lecture (1 Units)Open 18 / 20Robert RiggsWe 5:30pm - 7:00pmOlsson Hall 001
 Introduction to Digital Solution Design (DSD) is a one-of-a-kind, and first-of-its-kind, opportunity to learn the basics of platform-based digital development in an interactive and hands-on environment that fosters creativity, learning, and collaboration. DSD is uniquely structured to facilitate both classroom-style instruction and practical hands-on development work to meet any student’s learning needs. Concepts will be demonstrated using leading platform tools like Salesforce, Appian, and ServiceNow. DSD will cover CS and Systems Engineering topics including Agile and Scrum methodologies, data modeling, information security, and business process automation. Hosted by Deloitte Consulting in partnership with leading platform tools, the course is a university recognized, 1-credit class, taught by real-world Deloitte professionals with industry-leading cloud experience.
Women and Gender Studies
 WGS 4500Topics in Women, Gender & Sexuality
 Capstone: Gender Politics in Africa
Website  11606 001SEM (3 Units)Open 7 / 15Denise WalshTu 3:30pm - 6:00pmNew Cabell Hall 068
 This course focuses on the ways structures, institutions, and discourse shape gender in sub-Saharan Africa. It begins with the highly contested topics of pre-colonial gender relations and what gender means in Africa. Next, we turn to the colonial era, tackling themes such as white misperceptions of the Black body and the ways in which sex and gender were at the heart of the colonial state and national liberation movements. After independence, African women organized, moved into formal politics, and even brokered an end to violent conflicts, the third section of the course. Dramatic political transformations like these raised hopes that violence would diminish. The fourth section of the course explains why these hopes have yet to be realized, assessing gender-based violence and homophobia. Despite the odds against them, African feminists and queer theorists remain undaunted. In the final section of the course we consider their inspiring vision for the future that reaches beyond the continent and calls each one of us to action.

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