UVa Class Schedules (Unofficial, Lou's List v2.10)   New Features
Schedule of Classes with Additional Descriptions - Fall 2022
These data were not obtained from SIS in real time and may be slightly out of date. MouseOver the enrollment to see Last Update Time
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These pages present data mined from the University of Virginia's student information system (SIS). — Lou Bloomfield, Department of Physics

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African-American and African Studies
 AAS 2500Topics Course in Africana Studies
 Introduction to African Languages and Literatures
19013 002SEM (3 Units)Open 24 / 25Anne RotichMoWeFr 1:00pm - 1:50pmNew Cabell Hall 315
 What is Africa? What is the African imagination? How can we imagine Africa and write a narrative that fairly describes the African continent? This course will survey literary texts in English by contemporary African writers to see how they imagined Africa and issues that preoccupied the writers. Students will read a variety of literary texts including novels, short stories, poetry, film and songs and critically analyze the cultural and aesthetics of the literary landscape and then express their learning through class discussions, reflections, group presentations and the writing of an analytical digital stories.
 Race, Class & Gender
19015 003SEM (3 Units)Closed 25 / 25Liana RichardsonTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmNew Cabell Hall 395
 While many people in the United States embrace the rhetoric of equality, “the American Dream”, and “the land of opportunity”, social inequality by race, class, and gender is a persistent feature of our society. The overall goal of this course is to examine the social, political, and economic factors that cause and are produced by this inequality, paying particular attention to how race, class, and gender intersect to shape the lived experiences and life chances of Black people. First, we will discuss how race, class, and gender are socially constructed, and how power and privilege are patterned by them. Then, we will examine how the resultant social inequalities are perpetuated and reinforced by the policies and practices of social institutions, such as the labor market, housing, health care, media, and criminal justice system. Finally, we will consider potential strategies for disrupting these linkages, and the social justice politics associated with them.
 AAS 3500Intermediate Seminar in African-American & African Studies
 Race, Ethnicity, and Health in the US
13992 002SEM (3 Units)Wait List (0 / 199) 18 / 18Liana RichardsonTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amNew Cabell Hall 407
 In this course, we will examine the relationships between “race”/ethnicity, other axes of difference, and health disparities in the United States. Drawing from research in a variety of disciplines, including epidemiology, demography, and sociology, we will examine how health is distributed by race/ethnicity, as well as the social, economic, and political factors that give rise to the differential distribution of health across racial/ethnic groups. We also will discuss whether contemporary health promotion and disease prevention policies are sufficient to address racial/ethnic disparities in health and why other potentially more impactful policies have not been pursued.
American Studies
 AMST 2559New Course in American Studies
 Afro-Latinx Histories in the Americas
 JUST ADDED! It's US history & culture in a pan-American perspective!
21054 002Lecture (3 Units)Open 13 / 30Christina Proenza-ColesMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmGibson Hall 211
 This course traces some of the many ways in which U.S. history and culture are fundamentally interconnected with and inextricable from Caribbean and Latin American history and culture, with an emphasis on the centrality of the African Diaspora in American development.
 AMST 3790Moving On: Migration in/to the US
19599 001SEM (3 Units)Closed 30 / 30 (30 / 30)Lisa GoffTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmBryan Hall 235
 No waitlist but spaces often open up. Email me (lg6t@virginia.edu) if you'd like to join the class.
 This course examines the history of voluntary, coerced, and forced migration in the U.S. It traces the paths of migrating groups and their impact on urban, suburban, and rural landscapes. Students will dig for cultural clues to changing attitudes about migration over time. While novels and memoirs make up the bulk of the assignments, we will also analyze photographs, videos, films, poems, paintings, and podcasts. We will also explore the growing body of digital humanities resources related to migration and mobility, including but not limited to resources collected by the DPLA on the Great Migration and the Exodusters; and Torn Apart volume one, “Separados,” about 2018 asylum seekers at the Mexican border.   Assignments will teach students to analyze literature and popular culture; express their ideas in written and visual form; and conduct historical and cultural analysis and interpretation. Class participation/contribution is the core of this class: please note the attendance policy. Other assessments include reading responses, papers, and reflective essays. There will be one test; no midterm or final exam. Students will be required to volunteer 10 hours with a migration-related project during the second half of the semester.
Architecture
 ARCH 5420Digital Animation & Storytelling
Website  18927 001WKS (3 Units)Permission16 / 18Earl MarkTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amCampbell Hall 105
 Description: Arch 5420 is a small workshop/seminar that explores moviemaking through exercises in computer animation, Approximately five independently developed short animations constitute the work of the term culminating in a one to five minute time-length final movie project. An interdisciplinary group of students admitted to the seminar will bring perspectives from across the arts and sciences, and design and engineering. Movie projects may range in creative subject areas. For example, built and landscape architectural places may be experienced according to our own changing eye point of view, the transformation of light and objects, as well as the movement of other people. In addition, objects found in architecture and nature reveal formal, tectonic and spatial orders that can be understood through animated sequences that depict varying intervals of time.Storytelling, whether by means of simple character animation or more complex scene description, may be related to these contextual aspects of either real or imagined environments. An in-depth exploration of NURBS three-dimensional modeling and rendering will be the basis for representing built and natural environments, sculpting characters and creating complex geometrical forms. Subject areas for individual projects may range from short narrative movies to the analysis of mico-scale environments or larger scale architectural and landscape architectural settings. The work of the seminar is informed by screenings and the diverse subjects of student work and of other movies. Discussion of perceptual phenomenon provides a framework for the development and critique of individual work. Enrollment: Registration is by instructor permission. It is open to all graduate students at any level and to undergraduate students (typically second year and beyond) with some weight given to expressions of interest on SIS. There are otherwise no prerequisites. The instructor has a background in moviemaking that includes film/video production and computer graphics animation. Technology: The principal software is Maya, a professionally used product in computer animation and movie production. Other related products may be introduced this term as time allows for animation, including special software focused on sound editing and production in collaboration with the Digital Music Center. Maya provides an advanced set of animation techniques, such as instantiated motion, inverse kinematics, compositing, fluid dynamics effects, hair and clothing simulation and other special effects. Also used in the term will be software for digital video editing, compositing, morphing, sound capture and editing. Maya will be available on Apple and Windows computers throughout the school. Free educationally restricted copies of Maya are available for degree students who have access to a personal computer. We will have access to inertial motion capture equipment for full-body motion capture and work with motion capture data. The V-Ray Next plugin to Maya, academy award winning advanced global-illumination and light simulation program, is integrated into advanced rendering tutorials in the class. More information about personal copies under a pilot program established with Chaos Group will be announced in class. The class will take advantage of higher performance Vritual Workstations with all the software included. On grounds computer resources for independent use are also available in Campbell 105 and other locations to be announced subject to social distancing policies.
Architectural History
 ARH 1010History of Architecture I
10001 100Lecture (3 Units)Open 139 / 140Lisa ReillyMoWe 10:00am - 10:50amCampbell Hall 153
 We will explore how architecture affects us, as well as how it informs us about past societies. What does it tell us about the priorities and values of the cultures we are examining? In what ways does architecture shape human experiences; how does it enhance or detract from human activities? These are among the questions that will be asked from both historical and contemporary perspectives. This course will cover material from ancient Egypt through c. 1420 largely in Europe with some examples from Asia, Africa and the Americas. We will analyze monuments such as the Colosseum, the Great Stupa at Sanchi and Teotihuacan. Classes will be a combination of lectures and in-class activities as you learn the fundamentals of architectural history as well as how to analyze buildings. This course is required for all entering undergraduates in the School of Architecture and fulfills the historical perspectives and artistic, interpretive and philosophical inquiry requirements for students in the College of Arts & Sciences. It is open to any student interested in learning how to understand and analyze the built environment.
 ARH 4591Undergraduate Seminar in the History of Architecture
 Vikings into Kings
10232 001SEM (3 Units)Closed 6 / 6 (11 / 12)Lisa ReillyTu 1:00pm - 3:30pmFayerweather Hall 206
 The marauding Vikings are familiar from popular culture including the well-known tv series. Somehow they become kings who commission such extraordinary works as the Bayeux Tapestry, Durham Cathedral and the Cappella Palatina. This course will trace their transformation from raiders and traders across Europe and beyond into rulers of the wealthiest kingdoms in Europe through an exploration of their material culture. This fascinating transformation will be grappled with through discussions and a series of short writing assignments culminating in a research project. Seminar participants will learn how to organize, prepare and write a research paper. This course will fulfill the second writing requirement.
History of Art
 ARTH 2151Early Christian and Byzantine Art
18849 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 32 / 60Foteini KondyliTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmCampbell Hall 160
 We tour Byzantine sites in Virtual Reality, create Byzantine Art exhibits, play video games and talk about how our lives and experiences compare to those of Byzantine people.
 From the magnificent church of Hagia Sophia and the Imperial palaces of Constantinople to mosaics, icons, and items of personal adornment, this course will trace developments in the arts and architecture of the Byzantine Empire in the course of eleven centuries (4th - 15th c. AD). We will explore the role of early Christian and Byzantine art between Greco-Roman aesthetics and the artistic production of the Renaissance.
 ARTH 3591Art History Colloquium
 Medieval Mayhem
13553 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (0 / 199) 15 / 15Eric Ramirez-WeaverMoWe 11:00am - 12:15pmFayerweather Hall 206
 In this course, we will explore the historical and ideological frameworks in which medieval mystical practices joined the human body with nature, transcended the cosmic harmonies of divine proportion, and attempted to fashion the world according to desire and belief. We examine purifying practices such as the Eucharist or baptism, as well as, the manipulation of cosmic forces for personal or political reasons, using techniques ranging from horoscopic astrology to necromancy. Rather than focus exclusively upon hegemonic, orthodox Christian artistic celebrations of piety, the visual culture of heterodox and banned social or spiritual practices will be highlighted. In addition, we will examine the medieval foundations of modern racist ideologies and the legacy of eugenics at UVA specifically. This will enable us to deconstruct images of the Jew in medieval art and culture, as well as, explore Crusader ideals. Lastly, we will explore the role of medievalism in the ideological presentation of histories about the medieval period, with a focus upon the “wizarding world” of Harry Potter. Topics covered include: celestial modeling, eschatology, millenarianism, astrological prediction, horoscopes, talismans and crystals, spells and incantations, medieval gynecology, Hildegard of Bingen, monstrous races, Crusader violence and ideology, military machinations, relics and reliquaries, late medieval mysticism, alchemical theory, Hieronymus Bosch, and the medievalism of Harry Potter.
 ARTH 4591Undergraduate Seminar in the History of Art
 Paris and Prague: Twilight of the Middle Ages
13454 001SEM (3 Units)Open 11 / 12Eric Ramirez-WeaverWe 1:00pm - 3:30pmFayerweather Hall 215
 Late medieval Paris and Prague were united historically and genealogically by ties between the royal families of each city and artistically by the international Gothic style of the year 1400. In this course, we will survey the transformative era of the 14th and early 15th centuries, examining what the artistic record informs us about patronage, artistic styles, everyday life, science, and courtly culture in the late medieval period. Beginning with a brief examination of the Capetian court and Louis IX’s Sainte-Chapelle (consecrated in 1248), the seminar explores artistic evidence for the rise of the Valois and the social pressures or transformations which gave rise to masterful manuscripts, ascendant architecture, and intellectual innovation during their dynasty. A scholarly review of the patronage of Charles V and Jean, Duke of Berry, inter alia, provides an important introduction to key artists of the late medieval period, and focuses class discussion upon major themes of significance for the later middle ages, including courtly culture, lay literacy, the expansion of vernacular literatures, burgher domesticity, university life, mysticism and astrology, and late medieval developments in the liberal arts and theology. Rather than focus exclusively upon the French courts linked to Valois princes, however, this course radically interrogates and reviews the relevance of outlying centers of medieval influence like Prague. The courtly culture of Prague under Charles IV of France’s nephew, the Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV of Bohemia, and his prodigal progeny, Wenceslas IV, experienced an efflorescence in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. The spiritual, intellectual, ideological, and aesthetic aspects of the Beautiful Style will be evaluated, underscoring the pivotal and central place of Prague in the development of European artistic traditions. Comparing Paris with Prague, while examining the courts at each medieval city, provides a foray into an equally relevant discussion concerning the fact and fictions, framing conceptions of the late medieval world.
 Egyptomania
 NEW! Deciphering the mystique of ancient Egypt in modern and contemporary visual culture
12877 002SEM (3 Units)Open 11 / 12Anastasia Dakouri-HildTu 1:00pm - 3:30pmFayerweather Hall 208
 The seminar introduces students to perceptions of Egyptian antiquity in western popular visual culture of the 19th-21st c., from the silver screen to architecture, public monuments, sculpture and painting, critically examining the concept of Orientalism and its ideological roots in the Enlightenment and the Napoleonic era.
 Vikings into Kings
18860 006SEM (3 Units)Open 5 / 6 (11 / 12)Lisa ReillyTu 1:00pm - 3:30pmFayerweather Hall 206
 This course will fulfill the second writing requirement.
 The marauding Vikings are familiar from popular culture including the well-known tv series. Somehow they become kings who commission such extraordinary works as the Bayeux Tapestry, Durham Cathedral and the Cappella Palatina. This course will trace their transformation from raiders and traders across Europe and beyond into rulers of the wealthiest kingdoms in Europe through an exploration of their material culture. This fascinating transformation will be grappled with through discussions and a series of short writing assignments culminating in a research project. Seminar participants will learn how to organize, prepare and write a research paper. This course will fulfill the second writing requirement.
Astronomy
 ASTR 3480Introduction to Cosmology
Website  13843 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 31 / 45Mark WhittleMoWeFr 9:00am - 9:50amNew Cabell Hall 323
 The class is suitable for non-science and science majors and is open to first year students.
 Cosmology is the study of the entire Universe -- its origin in the Big Bang and its growth from a hot early fireball phase into its current majestic tapestry of galaxies, stars, planets, and even people. It is arguably the most exciting scientific field of our time, and it continues to experience major developments, both observational and theoretical. Our course is carefully organized to cover all the major developments, taking a path from the local Universe, with its expanding population of galaxies, out into the remote Universe of young galaxies, and back to the first million years, using the cosmic microwave background to identify the conditions at that time. We'll learn how primordial sound waves can teach us so much about both later and earlier times. We visit the first hour and first second, before contemplating the creation mechanism itself, called inflation. While inflation is still a tentative theory, the evidence for it grows, and there are some crucial experiments, some run by faculty at the University of Virginia, that could essentially verify, or rule out, the theory. As a 3000-level course the lectures and homework strike a balance between richly illustrated descriptions of the main concepts, and a simple quantitative exploration of the same concepts. No prior knowledge of astronomy or physics is assumed, and no math beyond arithmetic and simple algebra. Some homework projects use Excel to analyze cosmological datasets, but no prior knowledge of Excel is required. While the course is designed for non-majors, it is also suitable for astronomy and astronomy-physics majors since it presents a broad and intuitively accessible picture of this large and fascinating subject. The class is also open to first year students.
Biology
 BIOL 4910Independent Research in the Life Sciences
11899 001IND (2 Units)Closed24 / 0Masashi KawasakiTBATBA
 Course description Students will conduct life science research under the mentorship of a professor in research laboratories that conduct biological science at UVA. Laboratories in the department of biology are excluded from BIOL4910*. For each semester, BIOL4910 students’ will receive 2 credit hours (biology laboratory credit) for their research activities. The activities include understanding the goal of the project, underlying hypotheses, data collection, data analysis, learning laboratory techniques, and authoring the final report. * See BIOL4920 at: https://bio.as.virginia.edu/undergraduate/research How to register (Both for the first time and continuing students) - Identify several laboratories with research areas that you are interested in. - Contact the primary investigators (professors) of the labs, and explore the possibilities for joining the lab as a BIOL4910 student. (The professor may not be familiar with BIOL4910. Show this Course description to the professor.) - Obtain agreement from the professor for BIOL4910 mentorship. - Visit GoogleForm where you enter information regarding yourself, your mentor, and the potential research project. GoogleForm: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdXjdjIY-R7h01Yfqe_jghNHa8mBCDVx2TfxanDD6Xya4FWsA/viewform - Your mentor and myself will examine and approve your GoggleForm entry. - I (not the mentor) will issue permission for BIOL4910 on SIS. Students will finalize the registration on SIS. - Please note that you are NOT officially enrolled in BIOL4910 unlessl you successfully register yourself on SIS. Masashi Kawasaki (mk3u@virginia.edu) BIOL4910 Director
Biomedical Engineering
 BME 4550Special Topics in Biomedical Engineering
 Bioreaction Kinetics
 Bioreaction Kinetics (Biomedical and Pharmacological Perspectives)
16976 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (2 / 199)60 / 60Mohammad Fallahi-SichaniMoWe 12:30pm - 1:45pmBiomed Engr & Med Sci 1041
 Course Description (Why should you care about this course?): The increasing demand for Biomedical and Biochemical Engineers in the Pharmaceutical Industry is linked to the everyday utilization of engineering skills, knowledge and technology during all phases of drug discovery, design, and development. The integration of engineering principles with biological knowledge has already contributed to the development of many life-saving therapies and will remain a key driving force in the development of many more drugs. A major goal of this course is to bridge the gap between the fields of Biomedical Engineering, Biochemical Engineering, and the science of how drugs interact with biological systems, i.e., Pharmacology. The plan toward this goal involves: (i) learning about the principles of biochemical reaction kinetics and engineering, (ii) demonstrating how such principles can help us describe, model, predict and modulate the outcome of biochemical reactions in cells, and (iii) applying these principles to the understanding of pharmacological phenomena such as interactions between drugs and their molecular targets (aka Pharmacodynamics), and between drugs and the human body (aka Pharmacokinetics). This course may be a great choice for you if you are a motivated student who is: • seeking a rewarding internship or career in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry, • curious about the design/engineering of biochemical processes in cells, bioreactors or human body, • interested in the development and characterization of new therapies.
 Mechanobiology
Syllabus  19736 003Lecture (3 Units)Open40 / 75Brian HelmkeMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmBiomed Engr & Med Sci 1041
 Why are tumors detectable as stiff lumps? Why do fatty plaques in arteries only occur at certain locations? How does cell sensing of mechanical forces determine what kind of cell it becomes? These questions involve relationships between physical forces and biological mechanisms at the tissue, cell, and molecular length scales. In mechanobiology, we aim to understand how forces cause biological signaling in health and disease. This semester, you will explore examples in biomedical engineering research and in your own lives. We will work together to analyze key papers in the field and to practice explaining how mechanobiology impacts our lives and careers. Prerequisites: APMA 2130, BME 2101, BME 2104, BME 2220. Corequisite: BME 3240.
Civil Engineering
 CE 6500Special Topics in Civil Engineering
 Construction Practice
17008 006Lecture (3 Units)Permission 5 / 5Diana Franco DuranTBATBA
 Throughout this practicum course, a contractor opens an ongoing construction project on campus to students so they can shadow a Project Engineer, Project Manager, or Superintendent while performing different CEM tasks. Additionally, students do field walks and attend weekly meetings with the project team and are encouraged to analyze the Jobsite context, actors' behaviors, and decision-making relevant to the project challenges.
Chinese
 CHIN 1060Accelerated Elementary Chinese
Website  10374 001Lecture (4 Units)Permission8 / 18Ying GaoMoWeFr 9:00am - 9:50amNew Cabell Hall 168
 SIS Description: Specifically intended for students with native or near-native speaking ability in Mandarin Chinese, but little reading and writing ability. The course focuses on reading and writing Chinese. The goals of this course are to help students: (a) achieve control of the Chinese sound system (the 4 tones and Pinyin) and basic components of Chinese characters; (b) be able to write 400-500 characters, (c) express themselves clearly in written form on a variety of covered topics using learned grammar patterns and vocabulary, (d) improve their basic reading skills (including learning to use a Chinese dictionary).
 CHIN 3050One Book at a Time: Reading China from Cover to Cover
20644 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 9 / 12Ran ZhaoMoWeFr 12:00pm - 12:50pmNew Cabell Hall 066
  Students of second or above levels can select a book from a list of great Chinese literary works curated by the instructor to read. Some graded readers will be included for 2000-level students. This course provides students with the opportunity and support to read a book in Chinese language from cover to cover while discussing related social and cultural topics. Heritage students have the opportunity to pick a book of their choice. Prerequisite: CHIN 1020 or CHIN 1060.
College Advising Seminar
 COLA 1500College Advising Seminars
 One Great Book
12512 015SEM (1 Units)Wait List (8 / 15) 18 / 18Cristina GriffinTh 9:30am - 10:45amPavilion VIII 108
 What makes something or someone “great”? In this course, we will explore the concept of greatness together by reading one recent novel that has been hailed as “great” or “the best.” We will read the novel slowly over the course of the semester, digesting the book in small manageable increments each week. As we read and discuss together, we will amass different conceptions of greatness and question what cultural values these definitions reveal. Who has the authority to declare something or someone great? How are these definitions useful and how are they harmful? How do these ideas of greatness create or resist social hierarchies? Along the way, we will also think self-reflectively about our own personal relationships to the idea of greatness. What does striving to be great look like in our own lives? President Ryan has said that he strives for the University of Virginia to be “both great and good”; as you begin your journey at UVA, how do you want to define being “both great and good” for yourself?
 Charlottesville's Forgotten Civil War History
11720 024SEM (1 Units)Wait List (2 / 15) 18 / 18Brian NeumannWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmPavilion VIII 102
 This course examines the 257 Black men from Albemarle County and the 69 UVA students and professors who served in the Union military during the Civil War. For more than a century, the public memory of the Civil War in Albemarle County focused almost entirely on the area’s Confederate history. By uncovering the stories of these Black and white Unionists, this course instead highlights the fault lines within the Civil War South and sheds new light on the Confederacy's defeat.
 Ordinary to Extraordinary: Arts Trans Life
11734 027SEM (1 Units)Wait List (0 / 15) 18 / 18Ari BlattMo 11:00am - 12:15pmLower West Oval Room 102
 From Ordinary to Extraordinary: How the Arts Transform Everyday Life Students in this comparative, interdisciplinary seminar will explore the many ways that artists manage to find, represent, and critically engage with beauty in the banal. Students can expect to read some fiction, poetry, and a few lyrical essays. We'll also look at some photographs, paintings, and films. While readings on the aesthetics of the everyday will inform our discussions of work from the modern and contemporary periods, a series of short experiential assignments will encourage students to become more sensitive observers, and practitioners, of the quotidian. Since this is a first-year advising seminar, we will also spend a good deal of time discussing topics, tricks, and tips that should help class participants adjust to life at the University.
 Performing Acts of Justice & Equity
11903 030SEM (1 Units)Open 17 / 18Eric Ramirez-WeaverFr 11:00am - 12:15pmPavilion VIII 108
 This COLA course will introduce students to the transformative possibilities of community-based theater and dance. Emphasizing the rich resources in central Virginia from Charlottesville to Richmond, we explore the local history of the Theater Owners Booking Association (TOBA), and the ways that vaudeville and tap dance have played a prominent role in defining social and cultural mores, or reflected the inequalities of the Jim Crow era. This course will explore twin dual trajectories. On the one hand, the life and legacy of Bill “Bojangles” Robinson, as cultivated through the enduring work of the Copasetics, supplies one personal connection to this material. The Copasetics through Charles “Honi” Coles and Brenda Bufalino trained my teachers at the American Tap Dance Foundation. On the other hand, students will learn through a series of public outreaches how to study performance historically, and how to use performance to tell the living history of great performers. The graded work for the course will result in a public performance of student composed, rehearsed and performed work, celebrating the legacy and contributions of African-American artists in our region of Virginia. Our community partners include: the Jefferson School African American Heritage Center, Paramount Theater, Live Arts, and Charlottesville Ballet.
 One Great Book
11986 031SEM (1 Units)Wait List (5 / 15) 18 / 18Cristina GriffinTu 2:00pm - 3:15pmThe Rotunda Room 150
 What makes something or someone “great”? In this course, we will explore the concept of greatness together by reading one recent novel that has been hailed as “great” or “the best.” We will read the novel slowly over the course of the semester, digesting the book in small manageable increments each week. As we read and discuss together, we will amass different conceptions of greatness and question what cultural values these definitions reveal. Who has the authority to declare something or someone great? How are these definitions useful and how are they harmful? How do these ideas of greatness create or resist social hierarchies? Along the way, we will also think self-reflectively about our own personal relationships to the idea of greatness. What does striving to be great look like in our own lives? President Ryan has said that he strives for the University of Virginia to be “both great and good”; as you begin your journey at UVA, how do you want to define being “both great and good” for yourself?
Commerce
 COMM 2730Personal Finance
14627 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 33 / 49Dorothy KellyMoWe 8:00am - 9:15amRobertson Hall 256
 Student evaluation from F2021 "It is a great course that should be encouraged for all UVA students to take!" "Try to get more students. Advertise. More people need this."
 3 Credit elective for students with no previous knowledge of finance, investing, or managing money. Learn how to budget, save, and invest for your financial well-being AND earn 3 credits.
 COMM 4559New Course in Commerce
 Finance and Society
19649 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 18 / 20William WilhelmTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmRobertson Hall 254
 Note from the instructor: I have posted a course description. The only prerequisite is introductory microeconomics. If you have any questions, problems registering for the course, or would like a copy of this semester's syllabus, email me at wjw9a@virginia.edu. MORE FUN: NON-COMM STUDENTS ARE WELCOME IF THEY HAVE COMPLETED THE PREREQUISITE, EVEN 2ND-YEAR STUDENTS, WHO MAY NEED MY PERMISSION, WHICH I WILL GRANT IF THE COURSE CAP HAS NOT BEEN EXCEEDED. I'VE ALSO BEEN TOLD THAT I SHOULD INFORM SUCH STUDENTS THAT TAKING THE COURSE IN THE 2ND YEAR WOULD PRECLUDE IT COUNTING TOWARD BSC DEGREE REQUIREMENTS SHOULD THEY BE ADMITTED TO COMMERCE LATER... Bill Wilhelm
 Course Description: Financial markets play a central role in market economies, but they are complex, opaque, and prone to human error and misbehavior. This course addresses these social challenges by developing tools for economic, legal, and moral reasoning. The course is intended for a broad audience. Students who are not considering a career in finance will learn how to engage more effectively with public debate around financial markets, market economies and the challenges they pose for achieving a just society. Students considering a career in finance or business will also learn how to identify and more thoughtfully respond to conflicts and temptations endemic in market economies.
 Finance and Society
20113 003Lecture (3 Units)Open 10 / 20William WilhelmTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmRobertson Hall 116
 Note from the instructor: I have posted a course description. The only prerequisite is introductory microeconomics. If you have any questions, problems registering for the course, or would like a copy of this semester's syllabus, email me at wjw9a@virginia.edu. MORE FUN: NON-COMM STUDENTS ARE WELCOME IF THEY HAVE COMPLETED THE PREREQUISITE, EVEN 2ND-YEAR STUDENTS, WHO MAY NEED MY PERMISSION, WHICH I WILL GRANT IF THE COURSE CAP HAS NOT BEEN EXCEEDED. I'VE ALSO BEEN TOLD THAT I SHOULD INFORM SUCH STUDENTS THAT TAKING THE COURSE IN THE 2ND YEAR WOULD PRECLUDE IT COUNTING TOWARD BSC DEGREE REQUIREMENTS SHOULD THEY BE ADMITTED TO COMMERCE LATER... Bill Wilhelm
 Course Description: Financial markets play a central role in market economies, but they are complex, opaque, and prone to human error and misbehavior. This course addresses these social challenges by developing tools for economic, legal, and moral reasoning. The course is intended for a broad audience. Students who are not considering a career in finance will learn how to engage more effectively with public debate around financial markets, market economies and the challenges they pose for achieving a just society. Students considering a career in finance or business will also learn how to identify and more thoughtfully respond to conflicts and temptations endemic in market economies.
Computer Science
 CS 6501Special Topics in Computer Science
 Learning in Robotics
Website  19016 005Lecture (3 Units)Closed40 / 40 (50 / 60)Madhur BehlTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmOlsson Hall 120
 This is a graduate level class; undergraduates will need permission from the instructor to enroll
 A robot is a machine that senses its environment using sensors, interacts with this environment using actuators to perform a given task and does so efficiently using previous experience of performing similar tasks. We will cover the fundamentals of these three aspects of robotics: perception, planning and learning. A tentative list of topics includes state estimation (EKF, UKF, Particle Filters, visual-inertial odometry), control and planning (LQR, MDPs, sampling-based planning, bayesian methods), reinforcement learning (policy gradients, Q-learning, Imitation Learning, Offline RL) and some miscellaneous topics (meta-learning and formal verification). The coursework will have both applied and theoretical aspects. Some experience with, or appreciation of, robotics is recommended.
 Topics in Reinforcement Learning
Website  19017 006Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (5 / 199)50 / 50Shangtong ZhangTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amMechanical Engr Bldg 339
 Reinforcement learning (RL) is a powerful framework for solving sequential decision making problems and has enjoyed tremendous success, e.g., playing the game of Go and nuclear fusion control. In this course, we will dive into some theoretical topics of RL. You are expected to be comfortable with reading and writing proofs involving linear algebra and probability. You are NOT expected to know RL. We will make sure you can catch up even if you do not know RL before. After this course, you will be able to catch up with most RL papers easily and be well prepared to do research in RL.
 Autonomous Mobile Robots
Website  16866 012Lecture (3 Units)Closed12 / 12 (38 / 40)Nicola BezzoWe 12:30pm - 1:45pmRice Hall 120
 Nicola BezzoTu 5:00pm - 6:15pmOlsson Hall 011
 Have you ever wonder how an autonomous car or the Mars rover work? Or how a drone can fly autonomously avoiding obstacles while tracking objects on the ground? ...Then, this is the class for you!
 Have you ever wonder how an autonomous car or the Mars rover work? Or how a drone can fly autonomously avoiding obstacles while tracking objects on the ground? ...Then, this is the class for you! The objective of this course is to provide the basic concepts and algorithms required to develop mobile robots that act autonomously in complex environments. The main emphasis is on mobile robot locomotion and kinematics, control, sensing, localization, mapping, path planning, and motion planning. The class is organized in lectures on Tuesday and labs on Wednesday where you will have the chance to program state-of-the-art ground and aerial vehicles! Please note that this class is combined in Systems Eng (SYS 6060), Electrical and Computer Eng (ECE 6501), and Computer Science (CS 6501). In case one section is close, please try to enroll in any of the other sections.
Electrical and Computer Engineering
 ECE 3103Solid State Devices
Website  16157 001Lecture (3 Units)Open21 / 38Xu YiMoWeFr 10:00am - 10:50amRice Hall 340
 The MOSFET (Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor) is the most successful device in the history of electronics. It is one of the most manufactured devices ever, exceeding several billion per capita. This course will enable you to understand what transistors are, how they work, and why they are so important in today’s integrated circuits. To this end, we will explore how semiconductor materials can be used to make basic devices including pn-junctions and metal-semiconductor contacts. At the end of the semester, you will be able to design a transistor to specifications and apply the concepts you have learned to a vast array of semiconductor devices.
 ECE 6501Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering
 Autonomous Mobile Robots
Website  16240 002Lecture (3 Units)Open, WL (2 / 199) 16 / 17 (38 / 40)Nicola BezzoWe 12:30pm - 1:45pmRice Hall 120
 Nicola BezzoTu 5:00pm - 6:15pmOlsson Hall 011
 Have you ever wonder how an autonomous car or the Mars rover work? Or how a drone can fly autonomously avoiding obstacles while tracking objects on the ground? ...Then, this is the class for you!
 Have you ever wonder how an autonomous car or the Mars rover work? Or how a drone can fly autonomously avoiding obstacles while tracking objects on the ground? ...Then, this is the class for you! The objective of this course is to provide the basic concepts and algorithms required to develop mobile robots that act autonomously in complex environments. The main emphasis is on mobile robot locomotion and kinematics, control, sensing, localization, mapping, path planning, and motion planning. The class is organized in lectures on Tuesday and labs on Wednesday where you will have the chance to program state-of-the-art ground and aerial vehicles! Please note that this class is combined in Systems Eng (SYS 6060), Electrical and Computer Eng (ECE 6501), and Computer Science (CS 6501). In case one section is close, please try to enroll in any of the other sections.
Creative Writing
 ENCW 3350Intermediate Nonfiction Writing
 VOYAGES OF BODY AND MIND
18157 001WKS (3 Units)Permission 13 / 12Jane AlisonWe 2:00pm - 4:30pmBryan Hall 233
 Unless you are in the APLP, please send a message saying who you are and why you're interested in this class, along with a ten-page (max) writing sample, to me at jas2ad@virginia.edu. I'll let people know during the summer.
 A class for ambitious students who want to study ways of crafting literary nonfiction that focuses upon journeys, both internal and external. We’ll examine how other writers have taken their senses, scientific minds, beliefs, imaginations, and literary bloodlines upon ventures into unknown parts, including deep inside themselves (and their pasts) or even others’ bodies. We’ll study aspects of converting observation, speculative thinking, fact, and not-quite-fact into living narrative—how to contract and expand time, organize structure, shift among inner and outer worlds, create spaces, control questions and tensions—so that you can develop skills and craft your own exploratory pieces of lyric prose.
 ENCW 3610Intermediate Fiction Writing
13029 001WKS (3 Units)Permission 7 / 12Micheline MarcomTh 4:00pm - 6:30pmNew Cabell Hall 056
 Instructor Permission is required for enrollment in this class. APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: send a writing sample of 3-5 pages with a cover sheet including name, year, prior workshop experience, other workshops which you are applying to, and why you'd like to take this class. Submit your application IN A SINGLE DOCUMENT to mam5du@virginia.edu by July 31st and apply for admission through SIS. The instructor will let all applicants know by mid August if they have been admitted.
 Instructor Permission is required for enrollment in this class. Please apply for instructor permission through SIS. APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: writing sample of 3-5 pages with a cover sheet including name, year, prior workshop experience, other workshops which you are applying to, and why you'd like to take this class. Submit your application IN A SINGLE DOCUMENT to mam5du@virginia.edu by July 31st. The instructor will let all applicants know by mid August if they have been admitted.
 ENCW 4820Poetry Program Poetics
 Cutting Up: Collage, Play, & Resistance
11845 001SEM (3 Units)Permission11 / 12Brian TeareTu 2:00pm - 4:30pmDawson's Row 1
 By permission only. Please contact Professor Teare if you are interested in enrolling in or learning more about this course. bt5ps@virginia.edu
 Collage is a technique that originated in French visual arts around 1910. Collage has its root in coller, “gluing,” but from the start it’s been a practice of first cutting out/decontextualizing an image or phrase and then pasting down/recontextualizing it among other images or phrases. From its radical roots in Dada and Surrealism to today’s postmodern mixologists sampling cannily chosen source texts, poetic collage has always been about cutting up: as much about play as resistance, as much about exploring imaginative possibilities as about critique of the status quo. The readings portion of this course will immerse us in a historical survey of linguistic collage, while the experiential learning portion of this course will allow us to explore collage techniques literally – through in-class exercises with scissors and glue sticks, and by enacting related techniques like exquisite corpse and erasure. Together we’ll explore many iterations of collage over the past century – from Surrealism’s countercultural salvos to Negritude’s decolonial visions to contemporary feminism’s gender interventions – while each of us also develops and articulates our own personal collage poetics.
English-Literature
 ENGL 2502Masterpieces of English Literature
 Four Books, Four Centuries, Four Forms
18302 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (23 / 199) 20 / 20John O'BrienMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 115
 In this course, we will read four different works produced between 1600 and 2000, each in a radically different form: William Shakespeare’s play King Lear, Jane Austen’s novel Emma, T. S. Eliot’s poem The Waste Land, and Stanley Kubrick’s film 2001: A Space Odyssey. Each of these works is a masterpiece of its kind, an influence to many who followed it, and a work about which many critics have had things to say. They are all incredibly pleasurable and rewarding as well. We’ll use these masterpieces to explore the kinds of ways that you can approach literary and filmic texts. The course will fulfill the second writing requirement.
 ENGL 2506Studies in Poetry
 Introduction to Renaissance Poetry
 Including Sidney, Shakespeare, Donne, Wroth, Jonson, Herrick, Milton, Philips, and Marvell.
18291 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (9 / 199) 18 / 18Rebecca RushTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmAstronomy Bldg 265
 Click blue numbers to the left for a course description.
 What is poetry? What sets it apart from other modes of writing, thinking, imagining, feeling? What are the distinctive tools at the poet’s disposal? How do these tools work, and how can we describe their workings? Should poetry be plain or intricate, delightful or didactic, passionate or rational, heavenly or human? In this course, we will explore the many Renaissance responses to these questions by reading a selection of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century verse. We will inspect a range of poetic styles and genres, beginning with sonnets by Philip Sidney, William Shakespeare, John Donne, and Mary Wroth. Other poets will include Ben Jonson, Robert Herrick, John Milton, Katherine Philips, Richard Lovelace, Abraham Cowley, and Andrew Marvell. We will move slowly at first, sometimes reading only one poem per class, and will work together to develop the interpretive skills to unfold a poem. This course also aims to help you sharpen your skills as a writer. The first written assignments will be short, observational readings of poems that you will then turn into structured, argument-based papers. You will have the opportunity to revise one paper based on feedback from your instructor and your classmates. No prior knowledge of poetry, meter, or rhyme is expected. Lovers and despisers of poetry are equally welcome. The only prerequisite is a willingness to read with attention—and a dictionary.
 Lyric and Short Forms
 Lyric and Short Forms
20123 003SEM (3 Units)Wait List (7 / 199) 20 / 20Matthew DavisMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmRice Hall 011
 For a course description, click on "20123" to the left.
 This course is an introduction to poetry for students who have little or no previous experience reading poetry. We will read poets who wrote accentual-syllabic verse in English in the past 400 years. Some poets who might be studied include Phillip Larkin, Robert Frost, E. A. Robinson, Thomas Hardy, Charlotte Mew, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Emily Dickinson, John Keats, Edmund Waller, Robert Herrick, and John Donne. We will focus on short lyric poems and sonnets. There won’t be many poems on the syllabus that are longer than sixty lines, but every poem will need to be read several times, with very close attention. Students will learn techniques for making sense of poetry and practice “scanning” poems (marking stressed and unstressed syllables) using the For Better for Verse website. They will also comment on poems online using Perusall (software that facilitates “asynchronous social annotation of texts”), write two essays, and memorize a sonnet.
 Poetry of Place & Displacement
21047 005SEM (3 Units)Open 8 / 20Jeddie SophroniusMoWe 5:00pm - 6:15pmShannon House 109
 From poems of longing to elegies, the space offered by poetry has been used by writers throughout history to explore heartbreak, loss, and displacement. So what is it that’s so different from poetry that speaks so much to the maladies of the heart? What does it mean to be an alien in one’s own country? What does it mean to wear loneliness as a coat? And above it all, why poetry? In this course, we will ponder these questions. We will explore both the physical and emotional displacement in its many variations through the works of poets who have used the page to navigate through and adapt to the radical changes in their world. This course fulfills students’ Second Writing Requirement. As such, a major learning objective for this course is the development of student writing, which is reflected in the final course grade.
 ENGL 2507Studies in Drama
 Shakespeare's Sisters
20887 001SEM (3 Units)Open 7 / 20Mary Ruth RobinsonTuTh 8:00am - 9:15amNew Cabell Hall 187
 Pairing Shakespeare with women writers of the Renaissance. Click "20887" to the left for a full course description!
 Virginia Woolf once wrote that any woman writer in the sixteenth century would have died a lonely death: uneducated, oppressed, unable to ever write a word. But today, we know that women in the Renaissance—Shakespeare’s sisters, to borrow from Woolf—did write works of their own. In this course, we’ll pair plays by Shakespeare with lesser-known plays by women writers. As we work through these texts together, we’ll also discuss broader questions meant to shift our collective understanding of Renaissance literature. These questions might include: • Who gets to define ‘classic books’ or ‘great literature’? • Who’s allowed to write ‘great literature’ in the first place? • Does the relationship between a text and the author’s identity really matter? • How did gender, power, and desire intersect in 1610? How do they intersect today? • Why are English teachers always so obsessed with Shakespeare, anyway? Shakespearean enthusiasts and skeptics alike are welcome, as are majors, nonmajors, and students of all years. No prior knowledge (of Shakespeare or otherwise) is required—only a willingness to read carefully, embrace uncertainty, and rewrite the Renaissance together. Please write me at mrr7xr@virginia.edu if you have any questions about the course!
 ENGL 2508Studies in Fiction
 Country Houses in the Modern Novel
20889 003SEM (3 Units)Wait List (0 / 99) 20 / 20Zoe Kempf-HarrisTuTh 8:00am - 9:15amNew Cabell Hall 315
 A seminar on place and space in the novel. Click "20889" to the left for a full course description.
 Examining the objects, rooms, landscapes, and architecture of the literary estates featured in the works of Henry James, Virginia Woolf, E.M. Forster, Edith Wharton, and others, we will engage with these locales as more than mere settings. Country houses have a rich literary history of reflecting the consciousnesses of their owners and inhabitants, and we will further consider how these houses, estates, and places are used to reveal the social conditions and cultures of their era. Reading and reflecting together, we will discuss how these writers use materiality and place to communicate the aesthetic and other values of their times. Please contact zek7pr@virginia.edu with any questions.
 Experiments in Narration
 Narrative Perspective and the Reading Experience
20890 004SEM (3 Units)Wait List (2 / 99) 20 / 20Robert ZenzMoWeFr 12:00pm - 12:50pmNew Cabell Hall 389
 This class offers a sustained investigation of the complex relationships between readers and narrators. Throughout the semester, we’ll pair important bits of narrative theory with fiction that showcases the various tools and textual procedures by which an author delineates and focalizes narrative perspective. Topics on the table include the artifice of omniscience, free indirect discourse, the frame-narrative, the unreliable narrator, etc. By reading and discussing works that foreground both perspective and the limits of perspective, we’ll develop a sense for how narrators mediate the technical distinctions between story, narrative, and discourse while deepening our understanding of why those distinctions matter. Contact rz5dj@virginia.edu with any questions.
 ENGL 2527Shakespeare
 Recasting Shakespeare
 How did Shake adapt themes for his audience and how do today's artists rework those themes for us?
20891 002SEM (3 Units)Open 5 / 18Lucia AldenMoWe 6:30pm - 7:45pmBryan Hall 203
 In this course we will explore how Shakespeare reworked his source materials when writing his plays and how his plays were then recast for succeeding audiences as movie, novel, and play adaptations. Through our discussion and selected readings on adaptation theory, themes, and motifs, we will think about the evolution of "texts" as we try to tease out the difference between an inventive and creative production and an adaptation of a work. In the course, we will ask if Shakespeare's plays are *actually* timeless and, if so, why do the themes have such staying power? How do today’s artists transform the themes of Shakespeare’s plays so that they speak to today’s concerns? How do they imbue his plays with new meaning? Why does the content still feel so gripping and current four centuries later? DOES it?? How/why/is Shakespeare important to understand and engage with today? Texts read/watched in this course include: Twelfth Night, She's the Man; The Jew of Malta, The Merchant of Venice, the novel Shylock is My Name by Howard Jacobson; Othello, Paula Vogel's play Desdemona, the 2001 movie "O", the novel New Boy, and others. The last play/set of adaptations we read will be chosen by the class.
 Difficult Women in Shakespeare
20893 003SEM (3 Units)Open, WL (1 / 99) 15 / 18Valerie VoightMoWe 5:00pm - 6:15pmBryan Hall 312
 Heroines and villainesses in Shakespeare. Click 20893 to the left for a course description.
 This course explores Shakespeare’s work through the lens of some of his most infamous female characters: women who are enterprising, brash, insubordinate, even villainous. In what ways are their transgressions of typical social roles celebrated or condemned in Shakespeare’s plays? We will read a selection of plays including The Merchant of Venice, Macbeth, King Lear, and The Winter’s Tale and interrogate Shakespeare’s characterization of women alongside both contemporary and Renaissance ideas about femininity. No prior knowledge of Shakespeare is required for this course.
 ENGL 2599Special Topics
 Painting and Prose
18299 002SEM (3 Units)Open, WL (2 / 199) 19 / 20Cynthia WallMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmBryan Hall 328
 Somebody once said, “Ut pictura poesis,” or, “Poetry is a speaking picture, painting a silent poetry.” But what does that mean, exactly, and how does it work? Humans have told stories about famous paintings, and painted famous stories, all in attempt to figure out ourselves and our world. This course explores the many ways that art has imagined literature, and literature art, from Ovid and the Bible, through Shakespeare and Milton, Pope and Blake, Rossetti and Tennyson, the Pre-Raphaelites, and Aestheticism (Oscar Wilde). Requirements: active participation, weekly short commentaries, writing workshops, three short papers (5-7pp), and a final exercise.
 Literature after Auschwitz
20882 006SEM (3 Units)Wait List (6 / 99) 20 / 20Eyal Handelsman KatzTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmAstronomy Bldg 265
 How did Jewish American writers respond to the Shoah? Click "20882" to the left for course description.
 The Third Reich persecuted, dispossessed, tortured, and murdered, among others, millions of Europe’s Jews during its regime in the 1930s and 1940s. The event was so monumental that it has become central – perhaps, some scholars argue, in an overdetermined way – to our understanding of genocide and trauma. It led the theorist Theodor Adorno to argue that “to write poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric”. And yet, many victims, survivors, their descendants, and even those who did not have a direct link to the Holocaust have contended with it and its aftershock through literature. In this course we will examine how the Holocaust has been represented in the literature of (primarily) Jewish American authors. This course will explore issues such as memory and trauma, the ethics of representation, the notion of Holocaust “generations”, the Americanization of the Holocaust, and more. Students will engage with the ways in which our conception and memory of the Holocaust have changed in U.S. culture across time, some of the canonical texts and institutions that have shaped it in different ways, and the key debates in Holocaust studies in the 20th and 21st centuries.
 Science Fiction and Identity
20883 007SEM (3 Units)Wait List (5 / 99) 20 / 20Courtney WattsMoWeFr 10:00am - 10:50amNew Cabell Hall 485
 Can fiction help us see injustices in our own world with fresh eyes, or dream up a more equitable future? Science fiction has long been a site for exploring identity in alternate worlds, from utopias to dystopias and many spaces in between. In this course, we will dive into the exploratory world of science fiction, focusing on texts by writers of color as well as women and queer writers. We will consider the possibilities offered in these fictive worlds, while also exploring possibilities in how we read and write about them. Applying concepts from social movements in the real world, we will read works of science fiction as participating in a broader social dialogue, and then engage in that dialogue by writing critically about the texts we read. Along the way, we will delve into texts on the edge of the canon, considering what those marginal texts and marginalized voices have to teach us about our own world and possible other worlds.
 Serious Comedy
21015 14SEM (3 Units)Open 17 / 20Derek CavensMoWeFr 1:00pm - 1:50pmShannon House 111
 Despite its often-frivolous reputation, Comedy may be the most complex genre to understand. Encompassing numerous subgenres, purposes, and grounding theories, Comedy tends to raise more questions than it answers. What does it mean to laugh? Why is something funny (or not) to some people but not to others? To what extent does Comedy liberate and/or suppress differences in ourselves and others? And how should we respond to provocative or offensive humor in our rapidly changing culture? In this course we will unpack these questions (and more) by reading and viewing a wide range of comedic and analytical texts from Ancient Greece to the present.
 ENGL 3220The Seventeenth Century
 An Age of Revolutions?
18282 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (0 / 199) 25 / 25Rebecca RushTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amBryan Hall 328
 In this course, we will study the poetry, prose, and drama of a century marked by revolutions. In 1620, Francis Bacon asserted that all human knowledge needed to be rebuilt from the foundation upward. In 1649, John Milton argued that the English people could dethrone and behead the king (they did), and Gerrard Winstanley made the case that, while they were at it, they should also overturn personal property ownership (they didn’t). Over the course of the semester, we will tease out the common threads in these cases for philosophical, political, and economic revolution and interrogate the underpinnings of their arguments. Are their ideas really novel and revolutionary? Are the radicals really who we think they are? Why do they so often depict their revolutions as returns to older times? How do they qualify and limit their radical claims? We will read works of political and philosophical prose in conversation with literary works—from Francis Bacon’s scientific utopia New Atlantis to Aphra Behn’s comedy about the romantic exploits of Cavaliers in exile—that meditate on the transformations and continuities of the century in markedly different ways. Authors include Francis Bacon, Aphra Behn, John Donne, Ben Jonson, Robert Herrick, Thomas Hobbes, Andrew Marvell, John Milton, and Katherine Philips.
 ENGL 3310Eighteenth-Century Women Writers
18296 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (3 / 199) 30 / 30Alison HurleyTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmBryan Hall 328
 During the eighteenth century, social, economic, and technological developments in Britain converged to alter the ways in which texts were produced and consumed. The result of these innovations was a print culture that offered women the opportunity to step onto the public stage as professional authors for the first time. Female authors, nevertheless, remained intensely aware of their “delicate situation” within the literary public sphere. They responded to this situation by deploying a variety of authorial strategies that ingeniously combined self-promotion with self-protection in order to legitimize their appearance in print. This class will be particularly interested in examining the relationship between gender and genre in eighteenth-century Britain. Our readings will highlight a series of specific literary forms – drama, poetry, and the novel – each of which implicates gender in distinctive and compelling ways. Class requirements include frequent discussion thread posts; two thesis-driven essays; a poetry annotation assignment; and a “blue-book” essay-based final exam. Our class meetings will promote discussion and student participation and as much as possible.
 ENGL 3500Studies in English Literature
 Literary Games
 Co-taught with Jason Bennett
18303 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (0 / 99) 30 / 30Brad Pasanek+1MoWe 5:00pm - 6:15pmBond House 106
 Read, play, code
 This course in “extra-literary” criticism tasks English majors and other students with investigating the ways video games are available for interpretation and formal analysis. We will read game studies and literary theory, play games, and--take note!--learn to build them. Students will be introduced to the Unity game engine and framework. (No prior experience with programming required.) Our main effort is to check and test literary theory in "defamiliarized" ludic contexts, designing sprites and worlds and complicating traditional intuitions about narrative, characters, and fiction by means of game experiences. Students will protoype a literary game for their final assignment.
 Pursuing Happiness
19717 002Lecture (3 Units)Open 17 / 20 (17 / 20)Lorna MartensTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmPavilion VIII 102
 Fictions of happiness pursued--and found! Through the ages, people have sought happiness and formulated conceptions of what happiness means. Happiness could be something we once had--then lost--but might find again; something we might achieve by acting wisely or performing meritorious deeds; something possible through escape; alternatively, something available in the here and now; bound up with love or recognition from others; or a byproduct of creativity, independent of others. This course is not a self-help course. Don’t take it expecting to find the key to happiness. This is a literature course. We’ll read fiction, poetry, theory. But we will read some cheerful and uplifting (or at least moderately cheerful or uplifting) literature, to raise our spirits as the pandemic, with luck, recedes. Texts by Hesiod, Ovid, Chrétien, Rousseau, Schiller, Novalis, Wordsworth, Emerson, Valéry, Hunt, Rilke, Hilton, Stevens, Cavafy, Thurber, Giono, Nabokov, I. Grekova. Some theory of happiness and one or two films. Lots of discussion, two short presentations, two short formal essays, and a final exam are envisaged.
 ENGL 3510Studies in Medieval Literature
 Medieval Romance
18271 001Lecture (3 Units)Open, WL (1 / 99) 20 / 25Clare KinneyTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmMonroe Hall 118
 Medieval narratives of questing and testing, magic and wonder, courtly love and chivalric violence. Click the blue number to the left for full course description.
 In this course we’ll explore medieval narratives of questing and testing, of magic and wonder, of courtly love and chivalric violence. We’ll be paying attention to the gendering of romance and to the space it finds for female desire and female voices; we’ll also be considering romance’s representations of otherness and alienation. Towards the end of the semester, our syllabus will glance at two modern cinematic reinventions of the genre. Tentative reading list (the French works will be read in translation): the Lais of Marie de France, Chrétien de Troyes’ Lancelot and Yvain; Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Chaucer’s Knight’s Tale and The Book of the Duchess; Sir Orfeo; The King of Tars; excerpts from Thomas Malory’s Morte D’Arthur; John Boorman’s Excalibur (1981); Ridley Scott’s The Last Duel (2021). Requirements: regular attendance and lively participation in class discussion, two 6-7 page papers, a series of pre-class responses to our readings, comprehensive final examination.
 ENGL 3515Medieval European Literature in Translation
 Augustine of Hippo
18272 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 34 / 40 (34 / 40)Kevin HartTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amNew Cabell Hall 232
 St. Augustine (354-430) is certainly the most important writer in early Christianity and his influence, both literary and theological, has been varied, intense, and extensive. This African writer composed an immense oeuvre, including personal testimony, philosophical dialogues, scriptural commentary, thought about God, ecclesial controversy, letters, and sermons, while also, for much of his life, being Bishop of the town of Hippo (near modern Annaba, Algeria). His work marks much medieval literature, the theory of signs, our understanding of history, and rhetoric, as well as medieval and modern concepts of human selfhood and the nature of God. In this seminar we shall read a rich selection of Augustine’s writings, paying special attention to how he interprets Scripture, what he thinks we are doing when reading texts, what he says about prayer and seeing God, about Christian love, and what he thinks about the human relationship with the divine.
 ENGL 3540Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature
 Romanticism
18174 001Lecture (3 Units)Open22 / 25Herbert TuckerTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmNew Cabell Hall 315
  “Romanticism” is the odd but indelible name that belongs to British writing from the long, noisy turn of the nineteenth century. It was a time when the French Revolution and Napoleonic wars set old Europe’s social structures on fire, while underneath that political blaze the inexorable advance of industrial capitalism made for slower but surer changes in the way we modern heirs of the Romantics continue to live, argue, and dream. Readings will strike a balance between verse and prose, nonfiction and fiction (Walter Scott, Jane Austen), men’s and women’s writing. Class meetings will mix informal lecture with group discussion; to get poetry off the page and under our skin we’ll do a fair amount of reading aloud. Each student will write two shorter essays and one longer one. A collaborative mock-midterm in October will tone us up for the final exam at the end of it all.
 ENGL 3545Studies in American Literature before 1900
 U.S Literature and Social Justice
19721 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 27 / 30Victoria OlwellTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmMonroe Hall 118
 Exploring U.S. literature from the antebellum period through the Progressive Era, this course asks, what strategies did literary authors use to influence public debates about social, economic, and political justice? Beneath this question lie two more: What underlying conceptions of justice did U.S. literature advance, and how might we assess them? Literature during the era we’ll consider spanned the full political spectrum, but our focus will be primarily on literature invested in the extension of rights, equality, and protections to dispossessed people, as well as in the amelioration of politically induced suffering. We’ll examine literary protests against slavery, Jim Crow law, Chinese exclusion, urban poverty, women’s status, and the conditions of industrial labor. Course requirements include several short papers, class participation, and a final exam
 ENGL 3560Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature
 Freud and Literature
19718 004Lecture (3 Units)Open13 / 20 (13 / 20)Lorna MartensTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmPavilion VIII 102
 In formulating his model of the psyche and his theory of psychoanalysis, Freud, a scientist with a vast humanistic education, availed himself of analogies drawn from various fields, including mechanics, optics, philosophy, politics--and not least, literature. Freud textualized the human mind, turning the stories generated by its different levels into an object of analysis. But if literature was formative for psychoanalysis, Freud's ideas in turn captured the imagination of many twentieth-century literary writers. After introducing Freud's theories through a reading of his major works, including The Interpretation of Dreams, the course will turn to literary works by post-Freudian writers, including Kafka, Schnitzler, Breton, Lawrence, and Woolf, that engage with Freud's masterplot.
 ENGL 3570Studies in American Literature
 American Wild
18136 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (8 / 199)30 / 30Stephen CushmanMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmDell 2 101
 With biblical images of wilderness in mind, seventeenth-century English colonizers of Massachusetts described what they found as another wilderness, howling, savage, terrible. For them it was to be feared, avoided, and, where possible, tamed. Four centuries later, with eighty percent of U.S. citizens living in cities, many of them exposed to wilderness only through calendar pictures or screensaver photos, what meaning or value does American wildness have? Is it only a fantasy image, part of an American brand, as in the phrase “the wild West.” Are wildness and wilderness the same thing? Has the howling, terrible, untamed wildness of the seventeenth-century forest relocated to another sphere, in the wildness of wildfires in California and throughout the west? Is climate the new frontier, the new wilderness, where Americans encounter untamed wildness in droughts, floods, violent storms, and extreme weather? Have we come full circle to more biblical imagery, with apocalypse replacing wilderness as the rubric under which we encounter the wild? This course will begin with a look at biblical antecedents and their influence on white colonists encountering landscapes inhabited by native people. From there we’ll move to the literature of westward exploration, and further encounters with indigenous populations and their lands, in selections from the journals of Jefferson-commissioned Lewis and Clark. Then it’s on to the mid-nineteenth pivot toward wildness in the eyes of Romantic beholders, foremost among them Henry David Thoreau, patron saint of the environmental movement. Next comes John Muir, whose vision of wilderness preservation begat the U.S. National Park System. Proceeding to the twentieth-century, we’ll add important voices, such as Aldo Leopold’s and Rachel Carson’s and Rebecca Solnit’s, as the preservation impulse merges with concern about public health and social justice. We’ll complete our tour in the twenty-first century by joining the intensifying conversation, along with Robert Bullard, Alice Walker, Linda Hogan, Carol Finney, Lauret Savoy, J. Drew Lanham, and Garnette Cadogan, about whether the visions of Thoreau, Muir, et al. are exclusively white and male. Open to all. Those in the Environmental Thought and Practice Program welcome.
 ENGL 3660Modern Poetry
18135 001Lecture (3 Units)Open, WL (1 / 199) 14 / 30Mark EdmundsonTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmBryan Hall 328
 n this course we’ll seek to understand and appreciate a group of brilliant modern poets. We begin with Robert Frost, who offers immediate, and very real satisfactions, but who also, on extended study, reveals a deeper, darker side. We’ll read Wallace Stevens next, a stunningly original poet, who looked for paradise in his own imagination. Then we’ll consider T.S. Eliot—author of the culture-shaking poem, “The Waste Land.” With that basis we’ll move out to the singular observer and moralist, Marianne Moore; the independent and high spirited poet of African American life, Langston Hughes; and Elizabeth Bishop, artful poet of loneliness and solitude. Perhaps we’ll end with a contemporary poet or two. Ross Gay? Frederick Seidel? There will be a couple of quizzes, and a paper at the end in which students offer informed appreciation of their favorite writer in the course.
 ENGL 3790Moving On: Migration in/to US
19588 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed 30 / 30 (30 / 30)Lisa GoffTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmBryan Hall 235
 No waitlist but spaces often open up. Email me (lg6t@virginia.edu) if you'd like to join the class.
 “Moving On: Migration In/To the U.S.” (ENGL 3790) examines the history of voluntary, coerced, and forced migration in the U.S. It traces the paths of migrating groups and their impact on urban, suburban, and rural landscapes. Students will dig for cultural clues to changing attitudes about migration over time. Photographs, videos, books, movies, government records, poems, podcasts, paintings, comic strips, museums, manifestos: you name it, we’ll analyze it for this class. We will also explore the growing body of digital humanities resources related to migration and mobility, including but not limited to resources collected by the DPLA on the Great Migration and the Exodusters; and Torn Apart volume one, “Separados,” about 2018 asylum seekers at the Mexican border.   Assignments will teach students to do historical research; digital mapping and storytelling techniques; written and visual communication; historical and cultural analysis and interpretation. Learning outcomes include production of original work, critique of historical narratives; organization of diverse types of evidence; empathy; self-knowledge. Class participation/contribution is the core of this class. Other assessments include reading responses, papers, StoryMaps, and reflective essays. There will be one test; no midterm or final exam. Students will be required to volunteer 10 hours with a migration-related project during the second half of the semester.
 ENGL 3971History of Drama I: Ancient Greece to the Renaissance
18289 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 20 / 30John ParkerMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmWilson Hall 214
 The first third of this course will cover the drama of classical antiquity in translation, beginning with Greek plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and/or Aristophanes, then moving from there to the Latin plays of Plautus, Terence and/or Seneca. The next third of the course will consider the kinds of performance that displaced (and in some cases transformed) these pagan traditions after the Christianization of the Roman empire; we will likely read a liturgical drama, a morality play, a saint play, a vernacular Biblical drama and a secular farce. The final third of the course will cover plays from the Renaissance, focusing particularly on the commercial London stage of Christopher Marlowe, William Shakespeare and Ben Jonson. A major goal of the course will be to answer some of the questions posed by historical period: what does it mean, in the context of this particular genre, to move from antiquity to the Middle Ages to the Renaissance? How seriously should we take the differences between paganism and Christianity? What portion of early modern drama derives from classical antiquity, what portion from the Middle Ages, and what portion, if any, is new? What does it mean to say that drama by the time of Shakespeare had been secularized?
 ENGL 4270Shakespeare Seminar
18284 001SEM (3 Units)Open 12 / 18John ParkerMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 115
 A broad survey of Shakespeare's plays, likely to include The Comedy of Errors, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Romeo and Juliet, Titus Andronicus, Richard II, Troilus and Cressida, Measure for Measure, Hamlet, Macbeth, King Lear, Antony and Cleopatra, Coriolanus, The Winter's Tale. We will explore Shakespeare's relation to his sources, inquire into the earliest printed versions of the plays, and consider how practices of the print shop and playhouse shaped the texts that we have. We'll read one play per week, for the most part letting its particular concerns dictate the course of our conversation. There will be two papers (around 6pp. each), a midterm and final.
 ENGL 4520Seminar in Renaissance Literature
 Paradise Lost
18283 001SEM (3 Units)Open12 / 18Clare KinneyTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmBryan Hall 332
 Origins, revolutions, dangerous desires, and quite a bit of gender trouble. And John Milton's stunning poetry. Click the blue number to the left for full course description.
 We will slowly and carefully explore Milton’s enormous and embattled epic of origins—and we will also examine several of his earlier poetic experiments, glance at his political writings on censorship and divorce, and look at some provocative literary criticism of Paradise Lost. Among the issues the course will address: Milton the revolutionary (the politics and poetics of rebellion); Milton the rewriter of Scripture (inspired re-creation or Satanic supplementation?); Milton and gender (is paradisal bliss really conditional upon female secondariness?); Milton and literary history (how can we digest the poetry that tries to swallow all its predecessors?). Requirements: enthusiasm, stamina, regular attendance and lively participation in class discussion; regular e-mail response postings; a 6-7 page paper, a long concluding research paper.
 ENGL 4560Seminar in Modern and Contemporary Literature
 Modern Love and US Fiction
 Modern Love and US Fiction
18141 002SEM (3 Units)Wait List (3 / 199) 18 / 18Victoria OlwellTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmBryan Hall 332
 Maybe love is eternal, but it’s also historical and ideological. Love is shaped by custom, law, and narrative, and it plays a central role in the formation of private and public life alike. This course examines romantic love in U.S. fiction from the late nineteenth through the early twentieth-first centuries. Our primary texts will cross genres as well as centuries as we examine romance, realism, modernism, post-modernism, and documentary. In addition, we’ll read archival and scholarly non-fiction. We’ll interpret fiction in light of historical changes in conceptions of love, based in factors including shifting economic conditions and changing conceptions of marriage, citizenship, queer sexualities, and modern psychology. We’ll discern the connections between romantic love and ideas of race, gender, nationhood, and empire. Students will be graded on two short papers, class participation, and a 10-12-page final paper.
 Frost and Yeats: Poetry and Wisdom
18142 003SEM (3 Units)Open16 / 18Mark EdmundsonTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmBryan Hall 332
 ENGL 4____ Robert Frost and William Butler Yeats: Poetry and Wisdom; Is it possible for poets in the modern period to dispense plausible wisdom? Both of these great poets aspire to do just that. How is the wisdom they offer, or try to offer, different from what philosophers give? Is there a wisdom unique to poetry? Are there particular dangers to be aware of when poets aspire to be wise? Can they cause confusion? Can they cause harm? Do they sometimes erase the individual values of the reader with their authority and their eloquence? Or can they be lamps for our lives, teaching us, in Wallace Steven’s phrase, How to live and what to do? We’ll read most all of Frost’s poems and most all of Yeats’s, and maybe we’ll even take a shot at his wild, prophetic book, “A Vision.” A short paper, a longer one, plenty of class conversation.
 ENGL 4901The Bible Part 1: Hebrew Bible / Old Testament
19600 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (7 / 99) 15 / 15Stephen CushmanMoWe 11:00am - 12:15pmDawson's Row 1
 The stories, rhythms, and rhetoric of the Bible have been imprinting readers and writers of English since the seventh century. Moving through selections from the Hebrew Bible / Old Testament, from Genesis through the prophets, this course focuses on deepening biblical literacy and sharpening awareness of biblical connections to whatever members of the class are reading in other contexts. Along the way we will discuss English translations of the Bible; the process of canonization; textual history; and the long trail of interpretive approaches, ancient to contemporary. Our text will be the New Oxford Annotated Bible, 5th ed. All are welcome. No previous knowledge of the Bible needed or assumed. PLEASE NOTE: Professor John Parker will teach a course focusing on the New Testament in spring 2023. Both courses will read the New Testament gospel of Mark, connecting the semesters, but you do not have to take the fall course as a prerequisite for the spring one.
 ENGL 5559New Course in English Literature
 Violence and Possession, Medieval to Renaissance
18286 001SEM (3 Units)Open 13 / 15James KinneyTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmBryan Hall 233
 Violence and Possession, Medieval to Renaissance -- Have We Moved On?
 In this course we will study the expansionist foundation-projects set out and explored in a range of medieval and Renaissance genres, Beowulf to El Cid on to Henry V and beyond, winding up with the freelance imperialism of Robinson Crusoe and his followers. Other texts to examine include Machiavelli's The Prince, the anonymous Famous Victories of Henry V, select essays of Bacon, and select books of Paradise Lost. One short, one longer essay, regular class participation, and a final exam.
 ENGL 5830Introduction to World Religions, World Literatures
 Augustine of Hippo
20083 001SEM (3 Units)Open 12 / 15 (34 / 40)Kevin HartTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amNew Cabell Hall 232
 This course is offered through English and Religious Studies, at BA and MA levels.
 St. Augustine (354-430) is certainly the most important writer in early Christianity and his influence, both literary and theological, has been varied, intense, and extensive. This African writer composed an immense oeuvre, including personal testimony, philosophical dialogues, scriptural commentary, thought about God, ecclesial controversy, letters, and sermons, while also, for much of his life, being Bishop of the town of Hippo (near modern Annaba, Algeria). His work marks much medieval literature, the theory of signs, our understanding of history, and rhetoric, as well as medieval and modern concepts of human selfhood and the nature of God. In this seminar we shall read a rich selection of Augustine’s writings, paying special attention to how he interprets Scripture, what he thinks we are doing when reading texts, what he says about prayer and seeing God, about Christian love, and what he thinks about the human relationship with the divine.
 ENGL 8380Eighteenth-Century Prose Fiction
18297 001Lecture (3 Units)Open17 / 18Cynthia WallMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmBryan Hall 328
 Other than that they are (mostly) long to very long prose fiction narratives, eighteenth-century British novels have little in common, formally speaking. From the dreamlike (or nightmarish) landscape that is Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress, through Haywood’s shrewd amatory fiction, Defoe’s circling first-person narratives, the suffocating epistolarity of Richardson (that’s a compliment, btw), the self-reflexive irony of Fielding, the agonies of sensibility (not to mention punctuation) in Sterne, the psychological labyrinths of gothic, and the innovative interiorities of Austen, each new instance defines and patterns itself anew, and none bears much similarity to the nineteenth-century inheritors. We will look at a variety of historical and cultural contexts, such as changes in architecture, typography, and grammar, and the ways they map onto changes in literary perceptions of space, time, motion, things, narrative, typography, and even prepositions. Student presentations will track the theory and criticism of the novel from the eighteenth century to the present.
 ENGL 8500Studies in English Literature
 The Anglophone World Novel
 The Anglophone World Novel: Theory and Criticism
18248 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (0 / 99)15 / 15Debjani GangulyTu 3:30pm - 6:00pmNew Cabell Hall 187
 The course will explore theories of the anglophone world novel from the 1980s to the present. We will study the changing shape of the novel in the era of globalization, digital transformation, platform publishing, war on terror, ethnic and civil wars, and accelerating environmental crises. We will read novels by Ian McEwan, Don DeLillo, Ruth Ozeki, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Joe Sacco, and Amitav Ghosh among others. The course will engage with theories of the contemporary novel through the scholarly works of Cheah, Ganguly, Jagoda, Nixon, McGurl, and Walkowitz.
 ENGL 8540Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature
 World Gothic
 World Gothic
18244 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (3 / 199)14 / 14Alison BoothTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amBryan Hall 233
 Do gothic conventions travel? What elements compose "gothic"--a haunted house, an ancestral secret, an apparition, a protagonist captive or pursued, or others? How do history and nation change the meanings of such elements? What are some psychoanalytic approaches to the genre? How is it symptomatic (or not) of colonialism and capitalism? We will read a range of novels and short fiction that suggests both a history and a geography of gothic conventions, within the limits of a semester's syllabus. Probable selections include short or longer works by Walpole, Radcliffe, Coleridge, Austen, Mary Shelley, Irving, Bronte, Poe, Hawthorne, Stoker, James, Rhys, Wharton, and selections of works identified by BIPOC authors or “world literature” rubrics. Film and current media will be included. In addition to powerful impressions of haunting works, students will gain familiarity with theories of narrative form, feminist/ gender and postcolonial criticism, and political histories of genre. A short essay, a presentation, a project (encouraged to use digital tools such as StoryMaps), and long essay. This seminar can be taken as an elective, Option B, for the DH Certificate. A more extensive project can be proposed, and the final essay can be short accordingly.
 ENGL 8596Form and Theory of Poetry
 The Contemporary American Lyric Sequence
 The Contemporary American Lyric Sequence
18144 001SEM (3 Units)Permission15 / 14Lisa SpaarWe 2:00pm - 4:30pmPavilion VIII 108
 Please contact LRS9E@virginia.edu with questions about the course.
 ENGL 8596. FORM AND THEORY OF POETRY: The Contemporary American Lyric Sequence This seminar for practicing writers will focus on the lyric sequence in American poetry written since 1980. We will begin by exploring pointed gatherings of poems by Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, and Jean Toomer, but the focus of the course will be on contemporary poets working in series, both within and across embodiment as a book, including series and sequences by Anne Carson, Lucille Clifton, Shane McCrae, Kevin Young, Lucie Brock-Broido, Maggie Nelson, Claudia Emerson, Jess Rizkallah, Harryette Mullen, Sherwin Bitsui, D. A. Powell, Tom Andrews, Aditi Machado, Arthur Sze, and others. As we read, we will examine ways in which these contemporary sequences are in conversation with poets working in other cultures, traditions, and lyric modes, both mainstream and experimental. What poems had to have been written in order for these late twentieth- and early twenty-first-century lyric sequences to exist? How has the gestalt of the fragment in modernism and post-modernism evolved in recent work? Or devolved? What attracts poets to serial thinking? Is there a poetics of the lyrical sequence? What various formal ruses do poets working in series and sequences deploy and what might writers learn from them? We may have the pleasure of hearing from visitors, perhaps watch a couple of films, and make forays into the Fralin Museum of Art and Special collections from time to time, as well. Course work will involve a seminar paper or a creative project: the writing of a poetic sequence with accompanying poetics statement.
 ENGL 8598Form and Theory of Fiction
 Kafka and His Precursors
18145 001SEM (3 Units)Permission15 / 14Micheline MarcomWe 6:30pm - 9:00pmDawson's Row 1
 In 1951 Borges published a short essay entitled “Kafka and His Precursors” where he writes: “The word ‘precursor’ is indispensable to the vocabulary of criticism, but one must try to purify it from any connotation of polemic or rivalry. The fact is that each writer creates his precursors. His work modifies our conception of the past, as it will modify the future.” In this studio-seminar we will read many of Kafka’s works as well as several by his ‘precursors’ including parts of The Kabbalah, Marcus Aurelius, Thomas Mann, Bruno Schulz, Clarice Lispector, Borges, Roberto Calasso and others. We will also be considering visual art, including Bosch, Kandinsky, the Surrealists, and others.
 Students will work towards a final hybrid project wherein they will be asked to consider their own precursors. The course is open to all students, but designed for creative writers and 'ways of seeing' or reading as an artist. Please email me at mamdu@virginia.edu and tell me a bit about your interests if you'd like to take the course.
 ENGL 8820Critical Methods
 How Should a Critic Be
21077 001Discussion (3 Units)Open8 / 18Emily OgdenTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmJohn W. Warner Hall 110
 How should a critic be? This course approaches the question of critical method in terms of ethos rather than in terms of technique. Our focus in considering the history of critical method from the twentieth century to the present will be on ethos, the characteristic spirit that governs practice and self-understanding for practitioners in a certain period or within a certain school of thought.Following historians of science Lorraine Daston and Peter Galison, the course assumes that we can learn a great deal about scholarly practice by looking at the various “regulative ideals” to which critics hold themselves. A focus on ethos directs us toward considering criticism as having intrinsic value for the communities that practice it (rather than instrumental value for “society” or “democracy”). It also can serve as an invitation to us to ask how we want to be, as critics, in the present and future. This course surveys critical methods from the twentieth century to the present, with a special though not exclusive focus on practitioners who identify themselves as “critics” and who are trained or work in English departments. It is not a practicum course; that is, you shouldn’t expect to emerge with a set of tips about how to produce critical writing. Instead, we could call it an interested history: we will consider the open question of how we should practice and who, as critics, we might decide we should be, in relation to the way fellow critics have answered these questions. We will likely read such critics as: T. S. Eliot, I. A. Richards, William K. Wimsatt, Zora Neale Hurston, Lionel Trilling, Hortense Spillers, D. A. Miller, Fredric Jameson, Stanley Cavell, Robert Reid-Pharr, Saidiya Hartman, Christina Sharpe, Merve Emre, Rachel Buurma, Laura Heffernan, and Toril Moi. Course members should expect a significant reading load and near-weekly short writing assignments.
 ENGL 9580Advanced Studies in Critical Theory
 Material Culture: Theories and Methods
18306 002SEM (3 Units)Permission 13 / 12Lisa GoffTu 3:30pm - 6:00pmNew Cabell Hall 111
 Email professor for permission to join class: lg6t@virginia.edu. I may be able to add a few students over the cap.
 “Material culture” is the stuff of everyday life: landscapes and street corners, skyscrapers and log cabins, umbrellas and dining room tables and Picassos and Fitbits. Every thing in our lives, those we choose and those that are thrust upon us, conveys meaning—many meanings, in fact, from the intentions of the creator to the reception (and sometimes the subversion) of the consumer. Interpreting objects, buildings, and places provides insight into the values and beliefs of societies and cultures past and present. In this course we will study theories of material culture, many of which now intersect with literary criticism, from a variety of scholarly disciplines including anthropology, historical archaeology, art history, geography, environmental humanities, American Studies, and literary studies. And we will apply those theories to texts and artifacts of all kinds, from novels and short stories to movies, photographs, historic sites, visual art and culture, fashion and clothing, landscapes, parks and monuments, and more. We will read theorists familiar to students of literature, such as thing theorist Bill Brown, cultural theorist Walter Benjamin, and philosopher Bruno Latour, but also folklorist Henry Glassie; archaeologist James Deetz; anthropologists such as Elizabeth Chin and Daniel Miller; and political theorist Jane Bennet. The class will prepare you to interpret things in ways that illuminate texts, and to read texts in ways that reveal and cultivate the meanings of things.
Engineering
 ENGR 1501Special Topics
 SURE: How to Perform Research
20257 001Lecture (1 Units)Open2 / 38Brian HelmkeTBATBA
 As students, we often hear about professors and undergraduate students participating in research labs, but what is research? In this course, we will build the skills necessary to get involved with academic research, while exploring what research has to offer. Through hands-on activities, guest speakers, lab tours, and more, we will learn about academic research and professional development with a focus on community.
Entrepreneurship
 ENTP 1559New Course in Entrepreneurship
 What is NIL: History, Laws & Making Money
 NIL: History, Laws & Making Money
20151 001Lecture (0.5 Units)Open13 / 25Jason BaumMo 1:00am - 2:00am Web-Based Course
 This is a pilot course in the "Side Hustle Stack" set of 1/2 credit micro-courses offered by the McIntire School of Commerce. The course can be taken asynchronously and at the student's leisure.
 NIL: History, Laws & Making Money is an introduction to name, image and likeness and college athletics. The course will provide an understanding of how athletes earn money; licensing, co-branding (using an institution’s logos) and group licensing; negotiating and reviewing contracts; operating within different state name, image and likeness laws; institutions of higher education being involved; and being represented by agents and attorneys.
 How to Find and Engage with Important People
 How to build your network like "greatest of all time" entrepreneur
20152 002Lecture (0.5 Units)Open14 / 25Charles "Chip" RanslerMo 3:00am - 4:00am Web-Based Course
 This is a pilot course in the "Side Hustle Stack" set of 1/2 credit micro-courses first offered by the McIntire School of Commerce Fall of 2022.
 The "How to Find and Engage with Important People" course is an introduction to the mental models and skills needed to build a powerful network in the internet age. The class is delivered as a 1/2 credit "micro-course" available to be taken asynchronously at the student's leisure. The course gives a rich overview of the mentality of "Greatest of All Time Entrepreneurs" and how they think about building networks, why it's so critical to your success and gives you the skills needed to start connecting with important people that can help you get ahead.
Writing and Rhetoric
 ENWR 1510Writing and Critical Inquiry
 Writing about the Arts
 Revision in the Bardo
12953 006SEM (3 Units)Wait List (0 / 6) 18 / 18Hodges AdamsMoWeFr 11:00am - 11:50amBryan Hall 310
 This class focuses on research, revision, and the writing process. Students will read George Saunders' novel "Lincoln in the Bardo" as well as various other texts.
 Writing about Culture/Society
 Writing about the Future
10865 011SEM (3 Units)Wait List (1 / 6) 18 / 18Jeddie SophroniusMoWeFr 11:00am - 11:50amBryan Hall 334
 Pandemic, wars, rising sea levels, recession, metaverse—the world as we know it has been forever changed. What will remain, what will be obsolete? What autonomy do we have as individuals in a society where hyper-surveillance is the norm? What will the world look like when the world’s fossil fuels reserves run out in just a few decades? What will happen once all the corrals in oceans turn to stones? When the bees all die out? Have we destroyed our planet to the extent that it is unrepairable? Will metaverse be the new society? The focus of this course revolves around the understanding of key factors that are shaping our future and finding the roles we have to play to ensure we have the future that we want. Throughout the semester, we will keep up with international news that ranges from politics, the economy, to science and technologies that have the potential to impact many people's lives, be it for the better or worse. We will extensively read and watch speculative fiction and social commentary pieces.
 Writing about Digital Media
 Writing about Videogames
10878 028SEM (3 Units)Wait List (4 / 6) 18 / 18Alex SlanskyMoWeFr 1:00pm - 1:50pmBryan Hall 330
 Videogames, as a newly interactive form of entertainment technology, have inspired wave after wave of reflection and response. Using a game of your choice as your primary ‘text,’ we’ll add our own responses by playing videogames while considering them as the subjects of conversations on everything from violence to design. Through reviews, articles, video essays, and other media, we’ll ask what it means for entertainment to be interactive. We’ll discuss how games not only passively reflect our broader world but also actively intertwine with players’ choices. We’ll also explore how people think about games long after they’ve ended, extending that interactivity beyond the limits of the game into the world of publication. Then, we’ll write our own responses—reviews, articles, etc.—to those videogames and the ways that people interact with them.
 Writing about Culture/Society
 Writing and Reflecting Upon Society Through the Horror Genre
10883 033SEM (3 Units)Wait List (0 / 6) 18 / 18Kaylin PreslarTuTh 8:00am - 9:15amNew Cabell Hall 044
 This course will guide you into utilizing the horror genre to learn more about important societal or cultural events throughout history and relate them to the modern-day. We will delve into works that date back to the 19th and 20th centuries by authors such as Charlotte Perkins Gilman and Franz Kafka and will note how they compare to more contemporary works such as Carmen Maria Machado’s In the Dream House and the recently released Candyman (2021). Interest in the horror genre has steadily increased in the last few years. We will discuss why this is, how standards of what’s “scary” has changed over time, and how to convey our own fears about society in our writing.
 Writing about Culture/Society
 Writing about the Future
11004 037SEM (3 Units)Wait List (0 / 6) 18 / 18Jeddie SophroniusMoWeFr 10:00am - 10:50amBryan Hall 334
 Pandemic, wars, rising sea levels, recession, metaverse—the world as we know it has been forever changed. What will remain, what will be obsolete? What autonomy do we have as individuals in a society where hyper-surveillance is the norm? What will the world look like when the world’s fossil fuels reserves run out in just a few decades? What will happen once all the corrals in oceans turn to stones? When the bees all die out? Have we destroyed our planet to the extent that it is unrepairable? Will metaverse be the new society? The focus of this course revolves around the understanding of key factors that are shaping our future and finding the roles we have to play to ensure we have the future that we want. Throughout the semester, we will keep up with international news that ranges from politics, the economy, to science and technologies that have the potential to impact many people's lives, be it for the better or worse. We will extensively read and watch speculative fiction and social commentary pieces.
 Writing about Culture/Society
 Writing the Ethical Life
11904 044SEM (3 Units)Wait List (0 / 6) 18 / 18Derek CavensMoWeFr 10:00am - 10:50amShannon House 109
 This section of ENWR 1510 will examine the possibilities of—and problems with—writing about ethics. We’ll read a broad range of texts and view two films (outside of class) that explore the intersection of ethics, narratives and differing perspectives. We’ll write essays that analyze these texts and take positions in the debates that surround them.
 Writing about the Arts
 Are the Oldies Still Goodies? Writing about Music and Movies
12226 056SEM (3 Units)Open 11 / 18Sam JacobTuTh 8:00am - 9:15amNew Cabell Hall 056
 Some of us may have had the experience of a parent—or grandparent, or great-aunt, or granduncle—flipping on the radio or popping a VHS tape into the TV with a declaration that you’re about to experience “a classic.” Maybe you rolled your eyes and sighed relief when the song ended, or when the credits rolled across the screen. But maybe you fell in love with whatever album, band, movie, or director was shared with you. This writing-centered section of ENWR 1510 will give students a chance to explore their personal “oldies” – pieces of music and/or movies from the distant and not-so-distant past. Students will learn to write about how and why certain musical or filmic artifacts became personally meaningful to them, as well as why these artifacts may or may not influence their present day lives. By listening to, watching, and reading more about these artifacts and their historical contexts, we will both praise and problematize music and films, charting how issues of class, race, and gender influence the aesthetic and intellectual paradigms generating personal and societal rankings of art. Students will write inquiry-based pieces that explore their personal affinities for a certain piece of music or film, unpack the ideological components of these works, unearth the (il)legitimacy of a work’s current prestige and/or obscurity, and articulate why certain works do or do not achieve the status of “an oldie but a goodie.”
 Writing about the Arts
 Revision in the Bardo
12372 059SEM (3 Units)Wait List (1 / 6) 18 / 18Hodges AdamsMoWeFr 12:00pm - 12:50pmBryan Hall 334
 This class focuses on research, revision, and the writing process. Students will read George Saunders' novel "Lincoln in the Bardo" as well as various other texts.
 Writing about Identities
 Experiments in Learning
13036 068SEM (3 Units)Wait List (4 / 6) 18 / 18Stephanie CerasoTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmBryan Hall 310
 How do humans learn? When and where does learning occur? Why are we better at learning some things than others? Is it possible to learn how to learn? What does it mean to really learn something? This seminar will serve as a collective inquiry into the experience of learning. We will be reading and writing about a range of topics related to learning, such as curiosity, motivation, failure, boredom, attention and distraction, uncertainty, and more. In addition, our own histories of and investments in learning will serve as key course texts. Rather than talking about learning in an abstract way, you will spend a lot of time examining your own formal and informal learning experiences. Play and experimentation are also core principles of this class. Alongside more traditional writing assignments, you will get to create a mini video documentary about learning something new and participate in various “learning experiments” throughout the semester.
 Writing about Culture/Society
 Writing the Ethical Life
20772 081SEM (3 Units)Wait List (0 / 6) 18 / 18Derek CavensMoWeFr 11:00am - 11:50amShannon House 109
 This section of ENWR 1510 will examine the possibilities of—and problems with—writing about ethics. We’ll read a broad range of texts and view two films (outside of class) that explore the intersection of ethics, narratives and differing perspectives. We’ll write essays that analyze these texts and take positions in the debates that surround them.
 Writing about the Arts
 The Art of the Review: Writing About Music, Television, Art, and Film
20775 084SEM (3 Units)Open 12 / 18Lucy CatlettTuTh 8:00am - 9:15amBryan Hall 203
 Before going to the movies or buying a new book, most of us will refer to websites like Good Reads and Rotten Tomatoes to determine whether or not the art is worth the cost and our while. But at their best, critical reviews can do more than determine the “worth” of any work of artistic endeavor; they may provide roadmaps into concept albums, renews the relevance of classics, identify how a work magnifies the cultural imagination, or dig into the root of why some narratives in our culture win while others lose. Over the course of the semester, we’ll have the opportunity to make insights of our own as we learn the art of writing cultural reviews. Just as one does when composing literature essays, a reviewer of any artistic expression strives to read (or watch, or listen to) a work closely; analyze and understand its context, and explain what is interesting and meaningful about it. At the same time, we as a class will broach broaching the existential questions that attend the art of the review: what does it mean to write about art? What responsibility do reviewers of all kinds have to the art that they are reviewing, or to their readers? Is everyone qualified to be a critic? Like the works of criticism we read, the papers students will produce will be poignant but short in length. Authors we will encounter over the semester include Zadie Smith, Jia Tolentino, Peter Schjeldal, Emily Nussbaum, Maggie Nelson, Doreen St. Felix, Michiko Kakutani, Susan Sontag, and others.
 ENWR 2520Special Topics in Writing
 Writing About the Nonhuman
 Animals to Artificial Intelligences {click on 13904 to the left for description}
13904 005SEM (3 Units)Wait List (8 / 10) 16 / 16Patricia SullivanTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 594
 This course explores the relationship between humans and other beings or forms of intelligence especially animals and artificial intelligences. Students will consider the ways in which we use writing to represent our observations about, knowledge of, and feelings about these different nonhuman agents. In particular, we will address questions of personification, anthropomorphism and anthropocentrism, personhood, the nature of the human, and posthuman collectives. As a class, we will read and discuss stories, poems, nonfiction essays, scholarly research and the occasional science fiction film or scientific documentary. Students will be invited to compose a variety of texts -- autobiographical, analytical, argumentative, exploratory, reflective, speculative -- and conduct some original research. Through workshops, peer reviews, and individual conferences student will develop their awareness of their writing processes, the rhetorical options available to them and their resources as writers in and beyond academic contexts.
 Audible Writing: Writing for and with Sound
13905 006SEM (3 Units)Wait List (4 / 10) 16 / 16Jon D'ErricoMoWeFr 1:00pm - 1:50pmNew Cabell Hall 056
 Text meets audio. As a class, we'll explore, analyze, and produce audible writing in a range of genres, from podcast-style scripts, to audio news and features, to hybrid multi-modal documents. Appropriate for students who combine strong writing with a lively and engaged intellectual curiosity, this course meets the second writing requirement.
 ENWR 3500Topics in Advanced Writing & Rhetoric
 Vegan Writing
17992 001SEM (3 Units)Open, WL (1 / 10) 15 / 16Lindgren JohnsonTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 115
 What does it mean to write vegan? “Plant-based” cookbooks and PETA pamphlets might come to mind. But what happens when we approach veganism not just in terms of diet or even the essential work of animal liberation but as a deeper and wider foundation for thinking in ethical relation to all species, including our own, and the broader environment? What is the writing that organically emerges out of this foundation? This class will explore what becomes possible to think and write when we assume a foundation of vegan nonviolence. This shared commitment will allow us to see violence that we have been taught does not really count as violence, and we’ll ask why and how the larger culture continues to discipline all of us to think, write, and act in ways that destroy others’ relations, cultures, and lives, dulling our intellectual and ethical capacities and impoverishing our own lives in the process. The other and exciting side of the coin, then, is how vegan nonviolence opens us up to worlds and lives that otherwise could not be apprehended, and we will explore how vegan writing animates rather than destroys lives, even as it does not presume to know those lives fully. Many of our readings, which will include a range of material (children’s literature, scientific articles on animal cognition, philosophy, critical race theory, agroecology, film theory, literary criticism, and more), will attend not only to vegan thinking and writing but to the experience of living vegan, which can be isolating, and the class will be a space of support for those who experience such isolation. We will not be approaching veganism, then, as a solution simply to be applied to inherently violent systems (the “Go Vegan!” mantra) but as an ethical and intellectual foundation that yields revolutionary thinking and writing regarding, among other things, other-than-human autonomy and sovereignty, gender and racial equality, environmental health, equitable land access, and prison abolition. Rather than narratives and systems of lack, punishment, and violence, how can we create narratives—and out of these narratives, systems—of plenitude, support, and love?
 ENWR 3640Writing with Sound
Website  13421 001WKS (3 Units)Closed 16 / 16Stephanie CerasoTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmBryan Hall 328
 In this collaborative, project-based course, students will learn to script, design, edit, and produce a podcast series about a topic of their choice. In addition to reading about and practicing professional audio storytelling techniques (e.g. interviewing, writing for the ear, sound design), each student will get to work with a team to produce an original episode for the podcast. No experience with digital audio editing is necessary. Beginners welcome! Students enrolled in the Fall 2022 section of the course have a special opportunity to be part of a large-scale collaborative podcast that spans 3 semesters. That is, in Fall 2022, Fall 2023, and Fall 2024, “Writing with Sound” students in each class are responsible for four episodes per semester. By the end of Fall 2024, we will have created a fully realized twelve-episode podcast. Fall 2022 students have the important task of determining the UVA-related subject of the podcast that students in subsequent semesters will continue to build on. For instance, the podcast’s focus might be categorized under an expansive topic such as student experience, university culture, or university history. The exciting part is that it’s totally up to the students! We’ll be talking much more about this unique project in the first few weeks of class.
Enviromental Thought and Practice
 ETP 3559New Course in Environmental Thought and Practice
 Restoring our Relationship with Nature
Syllabus  18298 100SEM (3 Units)Permission 16 / 11Carolyn Schuyler+1TuTh 9:30am - 10:45amNew Cabell Hall 044
 By instructor permission.
 This course explores the practice, art, and science of connecting with nature and how we may restore broken linkages. We will ground our study in experiential activities, the science on nature and well-being and in the wisdom of local nature connection activists and indigenous ways of knowing. As we strengthen our relationship with nature, a reciprocal bond may form and support us in becoming resilient protectors of the natural world.
French
 FREN 3031Finding Your Voice in French
 Finding Your Voice in French Contemplatively
10508 001SEM (3 Units)Open 16 / 18Amy OgdenMoWeFr 10:00am - 10:50amNew Cabell Hall 191
 This section of 3031 will explore how contemplative practices can help increase our attentiveness to others and to ourselves, leading to greater confidence both in comprehension and in self-expression.
10509 004SEM (3 Units)Wait List (4 / 199) 18 / 18Cheryl KruegerMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 191
 Finding your voice doesn't happen overnight. Not in the language(s) we have been speaking since we were children, and not in a foreign language. The main goals of this course are to guide you on a life-long journey of self-expression, and to help you become aware of your own best practices for learning French. You will be encouraged to take reflective notes in class on the material with which you interact, and just as important, on your relationship to that material. Who are you when you read, speak, listen, and write in French? What are your strengths? How does improving your writing in French help you to better understand how you write in English? How does engaging with French influence your approach to other courses and to the world around you? Students in this course co-construct the reading syllabus, based on their own interests, by assigning and leading discussion of articles in French. They practice listening skills with our songs, podcasts, and other audio sources, and explore visual culture through our Portrait de la Semaine blog posts. Students practice both creative writing and more familiar genres (a film review, a persuasive essay) during in-class writing workshops and draft-writing. Integrated in all these activities, a semester-long grammar review guides students to better understand how form and meaning work together. COURSE OBJECTIVES to connect French to your academic, professional, and personal interests through short, current readings and discussion that you select to find your "voice" in written French to express yourself in writing in another language to experiment with writing genres and styles, including creative writing to think about how form and meaning work together, and how form can change, alter, skew, reinforce, refine the expression of ideas to practice editing and rewriting your own work to learn to use print and online resources to refine grammar and style to hone writing skills that will serve you in other courses (including courses taught in English) to learn to review and revise grammar independently to write with a sense of the reader in mind to read a variety of short texts with grammar, style, and register in mind to read and discuss short articles in French selected by the students themselves, based on their interests WHAT YOU WILL DO expand your knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, and culture, though our Chanson de la semaine/Song of the Week playlist explore visual culture by contributing a short entry to our Tableau de la semaine/Painting of the Week blog review basic French grammar and go into further depth on more advanced grammar; much of this will be done at home practice grammar with written exercises and an answer key (at home) integrate better grammar in writing develop a personal system for tracking the grammar you need to work on work in teams to compose drafts and to peer-review prepare to apply what you have learned to more advanced courses. discover the benefits of guided interactive note-taking in class share ideas and information in class and on a discussion board read short texts in class and at home discuss readings assigned by the teacher and by fellow students assign and lead the discussion of a reading of your choice from the internet, based on your interests
 FREN 3034Advanced Oral Expression in French
14065 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 15 / 18Gladys SaundersTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmNew Cabell Hall 287
 FREN 3034 Advanced oral expression in French This advanced course in oral expression has two main objectives: to provide students an occasion to practice their oral French skills in a variety of communicative contexts; and to offer them the opportunity to learn and reflect on various aspects of French culture of interest to their French-speaking contemporaries. Topics for discussion will be determined largely by student interests but will likely include aspects of French education and family life; the arts (French music, architecture, museum exhibitions, dance, theatre, haute couture . . . ); Franco-American relations; immigrant contributions; sports; and business culture. All class resources (including articles from French newspapers and magazines, journals, videos, TV and radio) will be available online. Students will be graded on their engaged involvement in class discussions, their in-class presentations (individual and group), a final oral reflective exam, and an audio and/or video class project or contribution to a class web-journal. FREN 3034 is the only course on offer to emphasize exclusively the skill of speaking French (spontaneously and fluently). Pre-requisite: FREN 3031 and either completion of FREN 3032 or concurrent enrollment in FREN 3032. TR 11:00am - 12:15pm (Saunders)
 FREN 3043The French-Speaking World III: Modernities
 Great Books
12480 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (1 / 199) 18 / 18Ari BlattTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amNew Cabell Hall 207
 Rather than focus on any single theme, movement, motif, or overarching problematic, this seminar will examine a few of the most admired and influential novels in the history of modern French literature. Special attention will be paid to the potential uses (and to the ultimate uselessness) of literature. How might reading fiction (and learning how to read it well) inform our understanding of the world and our place in it? Texts may include, but are certainly not limited to: Balzac’s tale of a young law student’s drive to make it in the big city in Le Père Goriot; Flaubert’s portrait of the original desperate housewife in Madame Bovary; Robbe-Grillet’s scandalously puzzling La jalousie ; Georges Perec's critique of consumer society in the 1960s (Les Choses); and Maylis de Kerangal's mesmerizing, polyphonic novel about love, loss, and our beating hearts (Réparer les vivants). We might also end our semester with an "extremely contemporary" novel published during the last year or two. Required work may include: active participation in class discussion, weekly ruminations on the readings posted to a forum on Collab, an oral presentation, and two or three analytical essays. Course conducted entirely in French. Prerequisite: FREN 3032.
 FREN 3559New Course in French and Francophone Cultural Topics
 French Across the Curriculum: France in the 20th C
20202 001Lecture (1 Units)Open2 / 6Karen JamesTu 3:30pm - 4:45pmTBA
 French-language discussion class open to students concurrently enrolled in HIEU 2122 (France in the 20th Century) who want to explore primary sources in the original French and discuss them once a week in French with classmates. The focus will be on reading and discussion, although students will also contribute weekly written posts and comments to a discussion forum. (1 credit) Prerequisite: completion of FREN 2020 (or equivalent by placement test score) and concurrent enrollment in HIEU 2122 For questions about the French reading and discussion session (FREN 3559), please contact Prof. Karen James (ksj7c@virginia.edu). For questions about HIEU 2122, please contact Prof. Jennifer Sessions (jes4fx@virginia.edu).
 FREN 3585Topics in Cultural Studies
 Beasts and Beauties
17807 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 14 / 18Cheryl KruegerMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 191
 Werewolves, vampires, phantoms, and fairies: these are some the creatures who inhabit the eerie space of French fiction. In fables, legends, fairy tales, short stories, novels, and film, outer beauty is associated sometimes with virtue, often with inner monstrosity. We will study the presence of menacing fictional creatures in relation to physical and moral beauty, animality, and evocations of good, evil, comfort, fear, the uncanny, kindness and familiarity. For their final project, students in this course write their own supernatural short stories.
 Heroes and Villains
19617 002Lecture (3 Units)Open 10 / 18Deborah McGradyTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 303
 From King Arthur and Joan of Arc to giants, monstrous women, and devils masquerading as humans, the medieval period gave birth to some of the best known and most (in)famous heroes and villains of world culture. We will study romances of “knights in shining armor” and their daring damsels, villains-turned-heroes and vice versa, and the exploits of fairies, transfigures, and wily part beast/part human creatures. What ideals and fears do these characters embody? Does gender play a role in constructing archetypes of good and bad? What do they say about society and the individual, community and the outsider? What can these archetypes teach us about modern definitions of good and bad, constructions of the “Other,” and our own societal fears? Readings in modern French from the past will be combined with modern French films and comics that revive medieval hero(in)es. Course conducted in French.
 FREN 4509Seminar in French Linguistics
 The Bilingual Speaker
19570 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 11 / 18Gladys SaundersTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmNew Cabell Hall 287
 FREN 4509 Seminar in French Linguistics: L’individu bilingue / The bilingual speaker TR 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm Saunders Nearly half the people in the world speak more than one language every day; and in France, some 13 million speakers use regularly several languages. Yet, says expert (renowned psycholinguist) François Grosjean, “le bilinguisme reste méconnu et victime d’idées reçues” (especially in France where, historically, a linguistic policy of monolingualism has been promoted). In this seminar, we shall explore the many facets of the bilingual and bicultural individual (focusing particularly on the two languages that everyone taking the course will speak: French and English). Our guide will be Grosjean’s 2015 book, Parler plusieurs langues: le monde des bilingues (an excellent analysis of the complex field for the French audience). Through our study of Grosjean and other sources, we will gain insight into some of the persistent myths about bilingualism and the bilingual individual. We will acquire knowledge of the linguistic characteristics of the bilingual speaker (e.g., the phenomenon of code switching, the principle of complementarity, language dominance, mixed linguistic systems, accent retention, translating / interpreting difficulties). We will advance our understanding of how one becomes bilingual in the first place (linguistic and psycholinguistic aspects). We will observe how others (writers, translators, artists, teachers, etc.) speak about bilingual/bicultural individuals in their work, and much more. Students will conduct fieldwork, record and analyze oral interviews, give oral presentations, and contribute daily to the in-class discussions on assigned readings and film clips. The seminar will be taught in French. Participants must feel comfortable speaking French in the classroom, as well as outside the classroom (some field projects will require the use of French). Course counts for major/minor credit in French and in Linguistics. Prerequisite: FREN 3032
 FREN 4582Advanced Topics in French Poetry
 Baudelaire and French Modernity
17809 001Lecture (3 Units)Open11 / 18Claire LyuMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 207
 Nous lirons une sélection de textes de Baudelaire (Les Fleurs du mal, Les Petits poèmes en prose, Les Paradis artificiels, et les critiques d'art) pour apprécier l'ensemble de la production littéraire de l'un des poètes les plus célébrés dans la culture occidentale. Nous procèderons par des lectures et des analyses attentives et examinerons la sensibilité et l'esthétique de la modernité baudelairienne: le problème du mal et l'éthique de la poésie, la structure et la déstructuration de la forme poétique, et la question de l'inspiration et de la lucidité dans l'entreprise poétique. De façon plus générale, nous nous intéresserons à la nature et au pouvoir du langage poétique ainsi qu'à la relation entre la poésie et la vie pour nous à l'époque contemporaine.
 FREN 4585Advanced Topics in Cultural Studies
 Tour de France
13671 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (5 / 199) 18 / 18Ari BlattTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmNew Cabell Hall 407
 While most university departments of French offer at least one undergraduate course that delves into the history, culture, and ways of inhabiting Paris (UVa regularly offers two or even three!), very few offer students a chance to explore the diverse spaces and places outside the confines of the capital city where, in fact, the overwhelming majority of French people actually live. This course proposes to do just that by inviting students on an expansive (though by no means exhaustive) tour of France through an eclectic mix of sources both literary and visual. Focusing primarily on the contemporary period, we will study the representation of an array of sites, many of them off the beaten path, that make France “France” today. From the disaffected former mining region in the Nord-Pas de Calais (just a short drive from the town of Calais and a number of migrant refugee camps nearby) to the sun-drenched valleys of Provence in the south. And from the expansive peri-urban zones around the capital city that remind us that “Paris” is a region, too, to national frontiers marked by mountains and seas. Special attention will also be paid to works that engage the undiscovered and largely forgotten territories that make up the sparsely populated and often disregarded “empty diagonal” that crosses central France from the northeast to the southwest. Through our reading and discussion of novels, short stories, essays, films, photobooks, and television shows, this course ultimately seeks to demystify the usual clichés about France’s diverse topographies, which are regularly mistaken as mere setting, background, or décor. If we look closely enough, however, these places often reveal themselves to be potent actors capable of disorienting dominant conceptions about how life in the “Hexagon” is lived. More specifically, students will discover how contemporary French culture mobilizes place as a complex vector through which important conversations (about national identity, class, immigration, postcolonialism, gender, history and memory, and the changing environment, for example) converge. Required work may include an oral presentation, short writing assignments, exercises in place writing, regular participation in class discussion, and a final project.
 The City of Paris: Stories of a Living Legend
17816 002Lecture (3 Units)Open10 / 18 (10 / 18)Philippe RogerMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmClemons Library 320
 This course will explore Paris, both as a contemporary metropolis and a multilayered palimpsest of history, legends and myths. A global city, Paris is today so much more than the capital of France; it holds meaning the world over. A real city of grit and struggle, it is also synonym of joie de vivre, as well as symbolic of lofty ideals. The principal theater of the French Revolution, it earned a reputation for insurrection and protest. A hotbed of artistic life and intellectual debate, it has been, and still is a magnet for talent, ambition, and dissent. How did Paris achieve such iconic status on the world stage? What myths and historical moments have defined it? Together, we will explore maps, paintings, and films that illustrate key features of the history, topography, architecture, and neighborhoods of Paris. We will discover the imagined city in art, literature and song. We will also interrogate the “American dream” of Paris, Black Paris, its promises and mirages. By the end of this course, Paris will be a familiar place. You will be able “to read” the city, unlock its codes —become a Parisian, even from a distance. Required work may include an oral presentation, short writing assignments, regular participation in class discussion, and a final project. Most readings will be short excerpts of important books (fiction and non-fiction) or articles about Paris. Readings and films may include (but are not limited to) work by Hugo, Zola, Sartre, Beauvoir, Hemingway, Marc Augé / René Clair, Jacques Tati, Éric Rohmer, Mathieu Kassovitz, Woody Allen. For a full syllabus and more information, go to the Collab site open for this course. Course conducted in French. Pre-requisite: FREN 3032 plus one additional 3000-level course in French. (N.B. Students who have previously taken FREN 3652: Modern Paris may not enroll for FREN credit in this course.) 
German
 GERM 3010Texts and Interpretations
10524 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 16 / 18Julia GuttermanTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 411
 “Texts and Interpretations” is designed to introduce students to the practice of reading and interpreting texts and to further students' overall German language proficiency in reading, writing, and speaking. Students will have the opportunity to familiarize themselves with different genres and media, as well as with the technical terms necessary to discuss and analyze them. Students will engage in class discussions and group work, which will take the form of creative tasks such as short performances of a scene, recitations (Lesetheater), or transformations of a text into a different genre in order to explore the conditions of meaning-making. Guided reading and writing assignments will exercise students’ critical thinking skills. Active participation is required throughout the course. All work will be conducted in German.
 GERM 3559New Course in German
 New Voices in German: Today's Literary Landscape
18678 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 15 / 18Julia GuttermanTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmNew Cabell Hall 364
 What do German speakers read these days? In “New Voices in German,” we will explore a selection of novels fresh off the press and ask how they critically engage with Germany’s multilingual and transnational (literary) landscape. Readings include Fatma Aydemir’s “Dschinns,” Shida Bazyar’s “Drei Kameradinnen,” Katja Petrowskaja’s “Vielleicht Esther,” Jackie Thomae’s “Brüder,” Khuê Phạm’s “Wo auch immer ihr seid,” and Saša Stanišić’s “Herkunft.” This course is especially suited to students who wish to enhance their vocabulary through reading and develop their writing and conversational skills. The course will be conducted entirely in German. Prerequisite: GERM 3010 or instructor’s permission. Email jg4mt@virginia.edu if you're not sure whether this course is for you!
German in Translation
 GETR 3720Freud and Literature
18682 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 13 / 20 (13 / 20)Lorna MartensTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmPavilion VIII 102
 For description, click on schedule number to the left.
 In formulating his model of the psyche and his theory of psychoanalysis, Freud, a scientist with a vast humanistic education, availed himself of analogies drawn from various fields, including mechanics, optics, philosophy, politics--and not least, literature. Freud textualized the human mind, turning the stories generated by its different levels into an object of analysis. But if literature was formative for psychoanalysis, Freud's ideas in turn captured the imagination of many twentieth-century literary writers. After introducing Freud's theories through a reading of his major works, including The Interpretation of Dreams, the course will turn to literary works by post-Freudian writers, including Kafka, Schnitzler, Breton, Lawrence, and Woolf, that engage with Freud's masterplot.
 GETR 3790Pursuing Happiness
18685 001SEM (3 Units)Open 17 / 20 (17 / 20)Lorna MartensTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmPavilion VIII 102
 For description, click on schedule number to the left
 Fictions of happiness pursued--and found! Through the ages, people have sought happiness and formulated conceptions of what happiness means. Happiness could be something we once had--then lost--but might find again; something we might achieve by acting wisely or performing meritorious deeds; something possible through escape; alternatively, something available in the here and now; bound up with love or recognition from others; or a byproduct of creativity, independent of others. This course is not a self-help course. Don’t take it expecting to find the key to happiness. This is a literature course. We’ll read fiction, poetry, theory. But we will read some cheerful and uplifting (or at least moderately cheerful or uplifting) literature, to raise our spirits as the pandemic, with luck, recedes. Texts by Hesiod, Ovid, Chrétien, Rousseau, Schiller, Novalis, Wordsworth, Emerson, Valéry, Hunt, Rilke, Hilton, Stevens, Cavafy, Thurber, Giono, Nabokov, I. Grekova. Some theory of happiness and one or two films. Lots of discussion, two short presentations, two short formal essays, and a final exam are envisaged.
Global Studies-Global Studies
 GSGS 2559New Course in Global Studies
 International Human Rights: History & Practice
Website  20751 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 17 / 40Huong Ngo+1MoWeFr 1:00pm - 1:50pmNew Cabell Hall 232
 Human rights is a complex but compelling topic that is crucial to understanding contemporary economic, political, environmental, and other issues. Students in this course will explore human rights from theoretical/conceptual, historical, and practical perspectives. While human rights have been important throughout the history of civilization, we focus in this course on the post-WWII period which saw the rapid development of human rights institutions internationally, and the post-Cold-War era during which remedial mechanisms have proliferated. As Eleanor Roosevelt put it in her 1948 speech at the Sorbonne in Paris, “The future must see the broadening of human rights throughout the world.” That enterprise, and this course, begin with the Universal Declaration on Human Rights (1945), and follows further developments in the international context.
 GSGS 3559New Course in Global Studies
 Business and Human Rights Across Borders
Website  20752 001Lecture (3 Units)Open3 / 15Huong Ngo+1TuTh 1:00pm - 2:15pmContact Department
 The course will include an interrogation of the concept of corporate social responsibility to discourse on the development of principles and norms and framework for business and human rights. Students will be introduced to United Nation's Guiding Principles on business and human rights and how they can be applied in the conduct of business activities throughout global supply chains. The students will examine cases of business violations of human rights and the effects of such violations on international, regional, and extraterritorial social justice. The students will work with situations and cases involving businesses’ duties on human rights to have knowledge on how businesses are held accountable for violations of human rights and how businesses should do human rights due diligence across global supply chains.
Global Studies-Security and Justice
 GSSJ 4559New Seminar in Global Security and Justice
 Peace, Security, Human Rights & Int Relations
Website  20753 001SEM (3 Units)Open3 / 15Huong Ngo Mo 3:30pm - 6:00pmTBA
 In this course, students will develop a working knowledge of the significance of human rights, peace, and security by examining and applying theories of international relations. We will explore discourses on human rights and state sovereignty, and how the search for peace and human security has evolved in the context of international relations. Students will debate challenging concepts, such as the justifications for international humanitarian interventions, responsibilities to protect nation-states, and the role (legitimate and otherwise) of non-state actors. Students will apply theories and concepts of international relations and human rights to past and current political and public policy issues and practice.
Global Studies-Environments and Sustainability
 GSVS 3310Sustainability Policy at Home & Abroad
 We are working on getting a bigger classroom and will increase enrollment ASAP.
19646 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (12 / 199) 40 / 40Spencer PhillipsTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmNew Cabell Hall 232
 In this course, we examine the main currents of U.S. and international natural resource policy (air and water quality, endangered species protection, public land management, private land conservation, participation in international conventions), consider their origins in broader streams of conservation thought (utilitarian, romantic, progressive), and learn to evaluate and assess these policies using cases involving current and past natural resource and environmental challenges (energy independence, biodiversity loss, recreational access, climate change). Students will also gain familiarity with the actors and processes by which environmental policy decisions are made (Congress, agencies, interest groups, appropriations, oversight, rulemaking, and environmental and related assessments). Principal assignments will be themed around “live”/current natural resource policymaking. A Washington DC field tour (tentative) provides a chance to hear from environmental policy-makers, analysts, and advocates. Instruction for the course will be primarily through discussion of cases and related reading assignments (Thoreau, Leopold, Carson, et al. but also legislation, CFR, Federal Register, and agency and public input into policy processes). Lecture will be used to present/emphasize key processes, analytical frameworks (e.g. environmental assessments and environmental impact statements), and how politics plays into policy.
 GSVS 4100Evidence for (Sustainability) Policy
19607 001SEM (3 Units)Open 8 / 30Spencer PhillipsTh 3:30pm - 6:00pmNew Cabell Hall 383
 Wendell Berry wrote: “A crowd whose discontent has risen no higher than the level of slogans is only a crowd. But a crowd that understands the reasons for its discontent and knows the remedies is a vital community, and it will have to be reckoned with.” In this course, we use “problem-based learning” to develop relevant facts and sound arguments surrounding local, national, and global sustainability challenges. We will work with live case studies in the U.S. and abroad, and follow the steps from problem formation, through model building, data collection, and qualitative and quantitative analysis, and finally on to technical and advocacy communications grounded in our facts.
 GSVS 4559New Course in Global Environments & Sustainability
 GIS for Global Sustainability
18454 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 7 / 20Spencer PhillipsTu 3:30pm - 6:00pmNew Cabell Hall 383
 Sustainability challenges occur in time and space, and understanding how location, proximity, distance, and the distribution of ecological impacts, of affected human populations, and of actions taken to address the challenges is crucial if we are to meet those challenges effectively. This course provides a foundation in the methods and skills needed to build the necessary understanding as well as an opportunity to apply the same to real-world issues. We will use the QGIS platform and related software, including spreadsheets (Excel/Google Sheets).
History-European History
 HIEU 1502Introductory Seminar in Post-1700 European History
 History as Knowledge and Sensibility
 click 18107 (at left) for more info.
18107 001SEM (3 Units)Open 14 / 15Allan MegillTu 5:00pm - 7:30pmGibson Hall 341
 RESTRICTED TO FIRST- OR SECOND-YEAR STUDENTS
 For an older syllabus TO BE REVISED, CLICK THIS LINK -- THERE ARE ALSO A COUPLE OF VIDEOS: https://www.academia.edu/39967022/1502FALL_2019_WEEK_BY_WEEK_SYLLABUS_version_2019_07_29
 HIEU 2122France in the Twentieth Century, 1871-present
 Optional 1-credit French Language Discussion Add-On
18108 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (3 / 199) 30 / 30Jennifer SessionsMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmGibson Hall 242
 ** See the end of this description for details about the optional 1-credit French language discussion add-on. This course explores the dramatic and difficult history of 20th-century France. French republicans envisioned France as a model of universal, secular democracy, but struggled with divisions of religion, race, class, and gender. Focusing on questions of citizenship, we will consider major developments in French society, culture and politics since 1871: struggles to establish the Republic; confrontations of the secular state with religion, nationalism and imperialism; the impact of WWI and the trauma of German occupation and the Vichy regime during WWII, the rise of consumer culture and economic modernization in the post-war period; European integration and the Cold War, decolonization and post-colonial immigration. To explore some big questions about the challenges of democracy, identity, and citizenship in an era of mass politics, empire, and war, our readings and discussions will center on five central themes: • How did the French define their nation and national identity? How did debates about the nation and national identity shape political life and institutions? • What was the relationship between France and its colonial empire? How did the ideas about race that shaped that relationship change over time? • How did the lives of French women change in a period of rapidly changing gender roles? What role did ideas about women and gender play in political and cultural life? • How did the rise of mass culture affect everyday lives and experiences? • What was France’s place in the world in an era of mass war and geopolitical transformation? How did France view and interact with other world powers, especially in Europe and the United States? Assignments will include regular participation and in-class work, two short 5-6 page papers, and your choice of an ongoing reading journal or two hourly exams, and a final research essay or take-home final exam. ** In Fall 2022, we will pilot an optional 1-credit French-language discussion hour for students interested in exploring primary sources in the original French and discussing them with classmates in French. Students who wish to add this option should simply register for FREN 3559 (French Across the Curriculum: France in the 20th C), in addition to HIEU 2122. Please email Professor Sessions or Prof. Karen James (ksj7c AT virg inia D0T ed u) with any questions.
 HIEU 3812Marx
18109 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (7 / 199) 60 / 60Allan MegillMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmNau Hall 211
 Click on 18109 to access a 3-page Course Description.
 For a three-page SHORT COURSE DESCRIPTION, including course requirements (briefly stated) and the titles and ISBNs of the four required books, see the "Teaching Document" section of my academia.edu site. Or attempt to access the "Short Course Description" directly through the following link: https://www.academia.edu/75644805/HIEU_3812_MARX_SHORT_COURSE_DESCRIPTION_1_FALL_2022ver2_1 . If the above link doesn't work, this link should get you into the close vicinity of the document: https://virginia.academia.edu/AllanMegill/Teaching-Documents best wishes, Allan Megill
History-United States History
 HIUS 7031Colonial British America
18260 001SEM (3 Units)Open10 / 12S. EdelsonMo 2:00pm - 4:30pmNau Hall 142
 For Fall 2022, this colloquium will focus on the global history of early America. We will read the new Cambridge History of America and the World, Volume 1, 1500-1800--a major new overview that recasts early American history in a global contexts--along with classic and recent monographs featured it its bibliographies.
Interdisciplinary Studies
 INST 2500Interdisciplinary Studies International Residential College
 Global Challenges: Where Do We Stand?
 Course open only to residents of the International Residential College.
14501 001SEM (1 Units)Open 3 / 16Phoebe CrismanTu 6:30pm - 7:30pmThe Rotunda Room 152
 Looking for an informal opportunity to discuss the pressing global challenges we face in the 21st century? Join this 1-credit interdisciplinary seminar for International Residential College residents. We will examine and debate complex social, political, environmental, and economic issues. Each week a distinguished IRC Faculty Fellow will post a reading on Collab to frame the discussion and will join the seminar. Most weeks we will meet in the Munford House ‘Fishbowl’ over an informal dinner. The seminar will meet 11 times beginning on August 30st (second week of class) and ending on November 16th (week before Thanksgiving).
Leadership and Public Policy - Policy
 LPPP 3500Special Topics in Social Entrepreneurship
 Equity by Design: Transformative Social Enterprise
 Building Equity through Social Enterprises
17316 001Lecture (3 Units)Open4 / 18Andreas AddisonWe 3:30pm - 6:00pmPavilion VIII 103
 Explore the process for creating transformational social enterprises from a foundation of human-centered design, historical and social context of inequalities, and empathy-building to achieve lasting equity. Learn how to build community wealth through developing social enterprises as gateways for accessing new opportunities.
 Social entrepreneurs desire to create a world that is diverse, inclusive, and accessible. We seek to advance equitable human rights by addressing social and economic injustices. At the root of this motivation lies the exploration of how to create a business venture that creates access to opportunity by providing employment, new skills, or access to needed services. Equity by Design will cultivate your abilities to create transformative social enterprises. This course will refine the skills, techniques, and approaches needed to develop transformative social enterprises. We will explore bias, apply human-centered design, and discover how to build empathy with our customers. Vital to creating a successful venture, is to understand the origins, context, and impact of the challenges facing the individuals we are trying to reach. We will learn to understand the problem from the customer's perspective, not from our observation. We will learn how to simplify the complex and understand how to reach the goal of your business intentionally and purposefully. Throughout the semester, we will hear from national social entrepreneurs and policy leaders about the importance of building equity and the importance of creating new transformative social enterprises. At the end of the semester, you will have developed an understanding of the skills, techniques, and approaches needed to create your enterprise.
 LPPP 4500Topics in Public Policy and Leadership
 A Critical Exploration of The Sum of Us
 A Critical Exploration of national bestselling book, The Sum of Us
20340 002SEM (1 Units)Open2 / 25 (2 / 25)Deborah Stroman+1Fr 2:00pm - 4:30pmMonroe Hall 124
 Critical Thinking. Racial Equity. Leadership.
 Heather McGhee’s national bestseller, The Sum of Us, is a brilliant analysis of how the policies that denied opportunity, services, housing, or wealth to Black people also hurt White people. McGhee provides moving examples of how we arrived here: divided and self-destructing, materially rich but spiritually starved and vastly unequal. This course is an in-depth examination of structural racism that reduced the economic output of the United States and the productivity of American workers. The book’s message inspires readers to analyze public policy and to have a new vision for a future in which life can be more than a zero-sum game.
 LPPP 6500Topics in Public Policy
 Negotiating Through Differences
18943 004SEM (1 Units)Open14 / 30Jieun PaiTu 7:00pm - 9:30pmRouss Hall 403
 Differences can take on many forms: people have different goals in their organizations, different needs they must fill, different beliefs about how best to work with others, and are culturally different from one another. In this course, we will explore negotiation strategies that can bridge and build on these differences. By the end of five weeks, you will develop a set of tools that will allow you to achieve a better outcome for both yourself and your counterparts.
 Data Wrangling in Excel
17291 007SEM (1 Units)Wait List (0 / 199)20 / 20Adam FelderTu 7:00pm - 9:30pmMonroe Hall 124
 Learn how to manipulate, clean, and analyze data using Microsoft Excel. Course covers a variety of topics, including but not limited to sorting, filtering, conditional statements, descriptive statistics, importing data, merging, graphing, pivot charts/tables, macros, financial analysis. No prior experience required.
Leadership and Public Policy - Substantive
 LPPS 3295Global Humanitarian Crises Response
17306 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 130 / 150Kirsten GelsdorfTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmGilmer Hall 390
 Getting access to populations caught in war in Ukraine, finding ways to address the devastating crises in Yemen and Ethiopia, the challenges of providing aid in accountable ways, the complexity of addressing extraordinary migration and refugee flows, are only some of the policy questions being faced in the humanitarian aid sector. Taught by a former United Nations official with two decades of experience working in humanitarian aid, this course will look at critical questions defining global humanitarian action and policy. Using historical and critical analysis and case studies; the foundations, dilemmas, and operational realities of providing humanitarian aid will be explored. This class will include practical and professional assignments, as well as guest lectures from other humanitarian responders and practitioners currently serving in crisis zones.
 Getting access to populations caught in war in Ukraine, finding ways to address the devastating crises in Yemen and Ethiopia, the challenges of providing aid in accountable ways, the complexity of addressing extraordinary migration and refugee flows, are only some of the policy questions being faced in the humanitarian aid sector. Taught by a former United Nations official with two decades of experience working in humanitarian aid, this course will look at critical questions defining global humanitarian action and policy. Using historical and critical analysis and case studies; the foundations, dilemmas, and operational realities of providing humanitarian aid will be explored. This class will include practical and professional assignments, as well as guest lectures from other humanitarian responders and practitioners currently serving in crisis zones.
 LPPS 5360Imagining Equitable Policy
Website  17314 001SEM (3 Units)Open, WL (2 / 199)24 / 25Michele ClaibournTu 3:30pm - 6:00pmWilson Hall 214
 Fall 2021 Course Site: https://commpaslab.github.io/lpps5360/
Media Studies
 MDST 3650Shooting the Western
13646 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (3 / 199) 30 / 30William LittleTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmClark Hall 101
 MDST 3650 Professor William G. Little Fall 2022 Wilson 204 Clark 101 Office Hours: W 1-3 and by appointment TR 3:30-4:45 e-mail: wgl2h@virginia.edu Shooting the Western We receive in many Westerns not just a mythic account of the founding of legal, civil society, with an American inflection, but the expression of a great anxiety about what this particular founded society will be like, whether it can hold together, whether it can really leave behind what it was. By this I mean leaving behind the mythic and largely feudal notion of nearly complete self-sufficiency and self-reliance, an honor code, the unavoidability of violence in establishing and maintaining proper status and order, a largely male and isolated world. Robert Pippin, Hollywood Westerns and American Myth Within the structured marketplace of myths, the continuity and persistence of particular genres may be seen as keys to identifying the culture’s deepest and most persistent concerns. Likewise, major breaks in the development of important genres may signal the presence of significant crisis of cultural values and organization. Richard Slotkin, Gunfighter Nation The American Western is a popular cultural phenomenon that has mediated the American experience in profoundly influential ways. The cinematic genre of the Western provides an opportunity to study how American mass media have constructed myths to frame narratives of expansion, acts of disruption, and promises made by charismatic authorities. The myths have shaped and been shaped by concepts of gender, class, race, and nation. Westerns have also dramatized complex visions of ‘progress’: e.g., the belief in America as Promised Land; the idealization of freedom; the promise of democratic rule; the suspicion of official authority; the idealization of private property and economic speculation; the transformative power of new technologies (e.g., the rifle, the railroad, the cinema). Students will examine classic and contemporary Westerns to investigate how these media-generated myths and visions of progress were traditionally informed by binary logic that privileges one term over another: e.g., human/animal, man/woman, white people/people of color, masculinity/femininity, purity/impurity, culture/nature, civilization/wilderness. The genre traditionally endorsed such logic by framing acts of conquest as stories of redemption, but the genre has also proven remarkably adaptable. This course focuses on numerous revisionary narratives that interrogate the power and value of this logic by subverting or reimagining the mythology. Required Texts All readings and course materials will be posted online on the UVA Collab website. A printed reading packet is available through NK Printing (7 Elliewood Ave). Readings must be brought to class Course Films (available to stream in Collab “Announcements”): Robert Eggers, The Witch (2015) 93 min. Howard Hawks, Red River (1948) 133 min. John Ford, The Searchers (1956) 125 min. Fred Zinnemann, High Noon (1952) 85 min. Edwin S. Porter, The Great Train Robbery (1903) 12 min. Nicholas Ray, Johnny Guitar (1954) 110 min. Clint Eastwood, The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976) 135 min. George Miller, Mad Max: Fury Road (2015) 120 min. Chloé Zhao, The Rider (2017) 105 min. Kelly Reichardt, Meek’s Cutoff (2010) 104 min. Jane Campion, The Power of the Dog (2021) 126 min.
 MDST 4510Capstone Topics
 Creative Labor and the Digital Media Economy
14284 002SEM (3 Units)Wait List (21 / 199) 20 / 20Pallavi RaoTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amGibson Hall 341
 Digital media platforms have changed "work" in media organizations as we know it in fundamental ways. What does an influencer do and what is their "workplace?" Can being a YouTuber pay the bills? How are algorithms and social media analytics changing expectations of organizational media labor? Can fans, who freely volunteer so much of their time and labor in online forums, be considered workers? This course explores the intersection of media and technology by examining what is known as monetizable "creative labor" in the digital economy. We will explore how aspiration/hope nurtures new kinds of work in the digital age, how it relates to inequality and precarity in the job market, the media industries' transformations linked to globalization and the spread of digital technologies, and the individualization of labor online. Finally, we will study the sociopolitical stakes of such labor by discussing: 1) the tech industry’s impact on media work cultures; 2) the invisible laborers of the online ecology; 3) and emergent economies of platforms. 
Middle Eastern & South Asian Languages & Cultures
 MESA 2559New Course in Middle Eastern & South Asian Studies
 Playing Games: A Gateway to the Mid East & S Asia
  “Playing Games: A Gateway to the Middle East & South Asia”
17819 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed 60 / 60Samhita SunyaTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmGibson Hall 211
 From the ancient history of games like chess and backgammon, to sports like badminton and falconry, to the "Great Game" of imperial conquests, this course offers an introductory gateway to the long-connected regions of the Middle East and South Asia. Over the semester, we'll explore this region of the world through short stories, films, tv shows, games themselves, and cameo visits by other faculty--all on the topic of "playing games"!
Medieval Studies
 MSP 3501Exploring the Middle Ages
 Medieval Identities, Cultures, and Conflicts
13601 001SEM (3 Units)Open 15 / 25Deborah McGradyTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmNau Hall 141
 First years are enthusiastically invited to take this class and will find a guided entry into upper-level coursework.
 If you think the medieval period was a backwards and barbaric time, think again! This course will challenge your preconceptions about the past by introducing you anew to a period marked by cross-cultural encounters, scientific discovery, religious and philosophical revolutions, and exploration of identity through culture, gender, and race. To experience the full richness of the world cultures from roughly 300 to 1500, a number of guest lectures from UVA faculty will enrich our readings drawn from the francophone tradition, which will range from crusading literature, love poetry, Marco Polo’s Travels, works of the first professional female writer – Christine de Pizan, and the trial of Joan of Arc. Most importantly, guest lectures will model the important work of interdisciplinary studies and put into practice the decentering of “national” literatures that is necessary to move away from a Eurocentric view of the past and toward a global approach to the medieval period. Course assignments will include response papers, collaborative class presentations, and a final research project that will take the form of a traditional paper, a podcast, or a creative work. This course can be taken to fulfill the Second Writing Requirement and it fulfills the Historical Discipline Requirement. FIRST YEARS are ENTHUSIASTICALLY INVITED to take this class and will find a guided entry into upper-level coursework.
Music
 MUSI 3510Music and Community Engagement I
 Sound Justice as Community Engagement
 This is a yearlong community engagement course
Syllabus  18674 001SEM (3 Units)Open 6 / 25Nomi Dave+1TuTh 9:30am - 10:45amOld Cabell Hall 113
 This yearlong community engagement class explores connections between sound, listening, and the law. How do legal proceedings play out in sound? What does the law hear – and what does it not? How do artists and ordinary people use voice to respond to legal failures? In exploring these and other questions, student will directly engage with the Sound Justice Lab and its ongoing projects, relating to issues such as reproductive justice, defamation lawsuits against journalists, gender equity and refugees, and the use of rap lyrics as criminal evidence. Students will meet with lawyers, artists, and social justice practitioners in Charlottesville and beyond, and will have the opportunity to produce research and creative work. Course materials will include court cases and transcripts, music, film, novels, and academic articles. Musical experience is not necessary.
 MUSI 3570Music Cultures
 Curating Sound: Art, Ethnography, and Practice
 curation linking art, ethnography and community practice
14253 001Lecture (3 Units)Wait List (1 / 199) 25 / 25Noel Lobley+2MoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmBond House 106
 This practical and discovery-driven design course explores the intersections of curatorial practice, sound studies, ethnography, composition, sound art, and community arts practice, through a series of engagements linking archival collections, local and international artists and art and community spaces, and the method and philosophies of embodied and experiential deep listening. Drawing from both the histories and potential affordances of sound curation we engage with practical examples ranging from sub-Saharan Africa to Australia, from Europe to New York, and right back here to the Charlottesville and UVA communities, asking what it means to curate local sound within globalized arts circuits. We will explore multiple and diverse case studies where artists, curators, communities, industries and institutions have both collaborated and clashed, as we ask whether it is desirable or even possible to curate the elusive, invasive and ephemeral object, medium and experience of sound. Throughout the entire course we will be working closely with professional artists and curators most notably Around HipHop Live Café and the Black Power Station based in Makhanda, South Africa, the Kluge Ruhe Museum of Aboriginal Art, and the UVA Scholars Lab. Less a lecture format, and more of an interactive workshop, critical and creative content will be explored in an open-pedagogical model where students apprentice as curators and eventually take an active role in curating the class itself. Expect a mix of group project work, individual reflection and portfolio curation, and real-world collaborative work with professional partners.
 MUSI 4545Computer Applications in Music
 Designing Audio Effect Plug
 Designing Audio Effect Plugins
12931 001Lecture (3 Units)Permission 10 / 15Luke DahlMoWe 3:00pm - 4:15pmOld Cabell Hall B011
 Audio effects are common and useful tools used in the recording, mixing, and mastering of music and sound, as well as in sound design. This course focuses on understanding, designing and implementing audio effects, and using them for musical projects. We will cover the signal processing involved in effects such as EQ, delay, chorus, flanger, reverb, distortion, and compression, and we will implement these effects as VST or AudioUnit plug-ins by programming in C++ and using the JUCE framework. We will emphasize the musical application of our designs, and as a final project students will create a unique effect that addresses their own musical goals. In other words we will learn fundamental aspects of digital audio, how audio effects work, how all real-time audio processing works "under the hood", and we will design and build our own audio effects. Enrollment is by instructor permission. Students are expected to have experience using digital audio tools (for example as covered in Musi 2350 or Musi 3390), and to have an ongoing music-making or sound-based practice. Previous programming experience is _highly_ desirable. Enrollment requires instructor permission. Please sign up on the Waitlist in SIS and describe your experience with digital audio tools (such as DAWs), your musical experience, your programming experience, your major, and your year.
 MUSI 7519Current Studies in Research and Criticism
 Audio Justice: Sound, Listening, & the Law
18681 001Lecture (3 Units)Open2 / 10Nomi DaveTh 2:00pm - 4:30pmOld Cabell Hall S008
 What happens when we listen closely to the law? How do justice proceedings rely on hearings? What are the limits of possibilities of audio in the courtroom? This seminar explores the role of sound and listening in legal discourse and practice. Bringing together materials and ideas from legal studies, music & sound studies, anthropology, philosophy, and history, we will consider how formal and informal justice claims are made through sound. We will listen to and consider a range of debates, cases, issues, and creative works. The seminar is connected to the new Sound Justice Lab.
 MUSI 7526Topics in Ethnomusicology
 Composing Ethnographic Stories
12503 001Lecture (3 Units)Open3 / 10Noel LobleyTu 2:00pm - 4:30pmContact Department
 As an interdisciplinary course, we welcome students from any discipline, so please feel free to contact noel.lobley@virginia.edu to discuss your interests and for any further information.
 Combining approaches from ethnography, sound studies, curation and composition we will explore the multiple ways and modes in which music and sound researchers convey stories about human and post-human interconnected worlds.
Physics
 PHYS 1660Practical Computing for the Physical Sciences
Website  12064 001Lecture (1 Units)Open 11 / 20Bryan WrightMo 1:00pm - 1:50pmNau Hall 142
 This course, PHYS 1660, will give you a kit of skills and tools that will help you do great things even if you're not a mathematical prodigy. All you need is a little computing expertise. This course is designed for novice programmers: no programming experience is required! We'll teach you all the basic skills you need.
Website  12386 002Lecture (1 Units)Open 12 / 20Bryan WrightWe 2:00pm - 2:50pmNau Hall 142
 This course, PHYS 1660, will give you a kit of skills and tools that will help you do great things even if you're not a mathematical prodigy. All you need is a little computing expertise. This course is designed for novice programmers: no programming experience is required! We'll teach you all the basic skills you need.
 PHYS 5720Introduction to Nuclear and Particle Physics
Syllabus  10939 001Lecture (3 Units)Open13 / 15Dinko PocanicTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmJohn W. Warner Hall 113
 This is a “field survey” course intended to acquaint the interested advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate student with the foundations, achievements, and current status of the field of elementary particle and nuclear physics.
Politics-American Politics
 PLAP 4450Virginia Elections and Politics
17756 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (0 / 199) 15 / 15Charles KromkowskiWe 3:30pm - 6:00pmBryan Hall 203
 This course will expose students to the scholarly literature on Virginia elections and the election data associated with these elections. Students will critically review the literature and use of a variety of analytical techniques, including GIS mapping software, to analyze both historical and recent elections in Virginia.Prior GIS expertise is not required for this course.
 PLAP 4500Special Topics in American Politics
 Redistricting
13285 003SEM (3 Units)Wait List (4 / 199) 15 / 15Charles KromkowskiTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmMechanical Engr Bldg 214
 This course will expose students to the theoretical, historical, legal, empirical and technical dimensions of redistricting. Our focus will be on election district redistricting in the United States, with the hope that our efforts will inform our understanding of redistricting in other social, political and geographical contexts. Students will gain an introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and the basic skills and tools of geographic analysis related to the redistricting process. Prior experience with GIS and the ArcGIS software environment is not required or expected.
Politics-Comparative Politics
 PLCP 4500Special Topics in Comparative Politics
 Nation-Building
13793 001SEM (3 Units)Wait List (7 / 199) 15 / 15David WaldnerMo 4:30pm - 7:00pmBrooks Hall 103
 In this research seminar, we consider why American occupation-based, nation-building produced capitalist, liberal democracies in Germany and Japan, while in most other instances, including the post-civil war American South, the Philippines, the Dominican Republic, Vietnam, Afghanistan, and Iraq, American nation-building fell far short of its goals. Readings include theories of nation-building and historical case studies. Following approximately 8-10 class sessions, students will write research papers (approximately 20-25 pages) in close consultation with the instructor.
Psychology
 PSYC 4100Neuroscience of Learning, Emotions and Motivation of Functional Behavior
 Neuroscience of Learning, Emotions and Motivated Behavior
19571 001SEM (3 Units)Open 22 / 50Cedric WilliamsTuTh 8:00am - 9:15amMonroe Hall 124
 This course is available to "non-majors" in Psychology with Instructor Permission. Email Prof. Williams at clw3b@virginia.edu
 I. GENERAL COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course examines theories, principles, concepts and research methodology that explain how brain processes underlying the generation of emotions, influence both long term learning and lead to the emergence of functional adaptive behavior. This material will be integrated with contemporary findings from the field of neuroscience to reveal how the development of subjective emotional expression involves underlying physiological, conceptual and cognitive processes coordinated by a constellation of different brain structures. The focus of the course is to understand the neural basis of behavior that emerges through emotional appraisal processes, cognitive conceptual learning, and principles of motivation. The course topics introduce students to the vast areas of behavioral neuroscience research, the ingenious approaches used to unravel the foundations of so many facets of behavior and the fascinating findings that are emerging to explain the brain circuitry underlying our behavior. The different forms of resources will be integrated to understand the neural basis of human behavior, psychopathology and brain related disorders (e.g. anxiety, depression, OCD, addiction, fear, helplessness). Exposure to these areas of science is a continued source of recruitment of students to participate in research conducted in psychology, neuroscience or cognitive-neuroscience labs.   II. PREREQUISITES The course is open to Psychology, Cognitive Science or Neuroscience major as well as to students outside of the major who have completed any 1000 level Psychology, Biology or Chemistry course.
Religion-Buddhism
 RELB 8738Tutorial in Chinese Buddhist Texts
18402 001IND (3 Units)Open2 / 5Natasha HellerTBATBA
 This tutorial will focus on the translation of Chinese Buddhist texts into English. Texts will be drawn from a variety of time periods, traditions, and genres. Students will gain familiarity with Buddhist Chinese, and the themes and conventions of Buddhist texts. At least one semester of college-level classical Chinese expected.
Religion-Christianity
 RELC 3620Modern Theology
 Christianity, Nazism, Holocaust -- Instructor: Victoria Barnett
19742 001SEM (3 Units)Open 13 / 20Victoria BarnettMo 2:00pm - 4:30pmShannon House 111
 This seminar will examine the wide range of Christian theological responses during the 1930s and 1940s to Nazism, the Second World War and the Holocaust. This will include theological and activist reactions from religious communities and leaders in Nazi Germany, the Vatican, the Protestant ecumenical movement, the interreligious movement, and American denominations, including the Black Church. Particular attention will be given to theological turning points and their legacies after 1945.
 This seminar will examine the wide range of Christian theological responses during the 1930s and 1940s to Nazism, the Second World War and the Holocaust. This will include theological and activist reactions from religious communities and leaders in Nazi Germany, the Vatican, the Protestant ecumenical movement, the interreligious movement, and American denominations, including the Black Church. Particular attention will be given to theological turning points and their legacies after 1945.
 RELC 3790Augustine of Hippo
18037 101Lecture (3 Units)Open 34 / 40 (34 / 40)Kevin HartTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amNew Cabell Hall 232
 St. Augustine (354-430) is certainly the most important writer in early Christianity and his influence, both literary and theological, has been varied, intense, and extensive. This African writer composed an immense oeuvre, including personal testimony, philosophical dialogues, scriptural commentary, thought about God, ecclesial controversy, letters, and sermons, while also, for much of his life, being Bishop of the town of Hippo (near modern Annaba, Algeria). His work marks much medieval literature, the theory of signs, our understanding of history, and rhetoric, as well as medieval and modern concepts of human selfhood and the nature of God. In this seminar we shall read a rich selection of Augustine’s writings, paying special attention to how he interprets Scripture, what he thinks we are doing when reading texts, what he says about prayer and seeing God, about Christian love, and what he thinks about the human relationship with the divine.
Religion-General Religion
 RELG 2300Religious Ethics and Moral Problems
18046 100Lecture (3 Units)Open 31 / 60Charles MathewesTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmNau Hall 211
 Class sessions are 50 minutes, not 75 minutes.
 This class has two fifty-minute (not 75 minute) lectures a week and one discussion section. We talk about ethical issues around sex, marriage, war, economics, lying, evil and sin, saints, forgiveness, capital punishment, and the environment, among other topics. We read Jewish, Christian, Islamic, and many secular thinkers on these issues. Movies may be involved.
Systems & Information Engineering
 SYS 6060Autonomous Mobile Robots
Website  20056 001Lecture (3 Units)Open10 / 11 (38 / 40)Nicola BezzoWe 12:30pm - 1:45pmRice Hall 120
 Nicola BezzoTu 5:00pm - 6:15pmOlsson Hall 011
 Have you ever wonder how an autonomous car or the Mars rover work? Or how a drone can fly autonomously avoiding obstacles while tracking objects on the ground? ...Then, this is the class for you!
 Have you ever wonder how an autonomous car or the Mars rover work? Or how a drone can fly autonomously avoiding obstacles while tracking objects on the ground? ...Then, this is the class for you! The objective of this course is to provide the basic concepts and algorithms required to develop mobile robots that act autonomously in complex environments. The main emphasis is on mobile robot locomotion and kinematics, control, sensing, localization, mapping, path planning, and motion planning. The class is organized in lectures on Tuesday and labs on Wednesday where you will have the chance to program state-of-the-art ground and aerial vehicles! Please note that this class is combined in Systems Eng (SYS 6060), Electrical and Computer Eng (ECE 6501), and Computer Science (CS 6501). In case one section is close, please try to enroll in any of the other sections.
 SYS 6581Selected Topics in Systems Engineering
 Learning in Robotics
Website  19731 010Lecture (3 Units)Open10 / 20 (50 / 60)Madhur BehlTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmOlsson Hall 120
 This is a graduate level class; undergraduates will need permission from the instructor to enroll
 A robot is a machine that senses its environment using sensors, interacts with this environment using actuators to perform a given task and does so efficiently using previous experience of performing similar tasks. We will cover the fundamentals of these three aspects of robotics: perception, planning and learning. A tentative list of topics includes state estimation (EKF, UKF, Particle Filters, visual-inertial odometry), control and planning (LQR, MDPs, sampling-based planning, bayesian methods), reinforcement learning (policy gradients, Q-learning, Imitation Learning, Offline RL) and some miscellaneous topics (meta-learning and formal verification). The coursework will have both applied and theoretical aspects. Some experience with, or appreciation of, robotics is recommended.
Urdu
 URDU 1559New Course in Urdu
 Heritage Speaker Script & Grammar Review
19705 001Lecture (3 Units)Open9 / 20Griffith ChausseeMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmWilson Hall 244
 A systematic review/re-introduction of the Nastaliq script and accelerated review of fundamental grammar for heritage speakers of Urdu. After mastering the contents of this class students will be able to proceed directly into a 2000- or 3000-level Urdu class, depending on prior proficiency level.
 URDU 3559New Course in Urdu
 Murder, Mayhem, and Irony: the Stories of Manto
19704 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 2 / 14Griffith ChausseeTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amNew Cabell Hall 038
 Much of Sa'adat Hasan Manto's Urdu short fiction revolves around characters we might describe as criminal, insane, violent, and/or intoxicated. But woven into these stories are bright threads of irony and love. He was a controversial author when he wrote such stories 70 years ago, and he remains controversial. We will read in Urdu several of his iconic short stories, and discuss their humanism and relevance for the 21st century.
University Seminar
 USEM 1570University Seminar
 Designing a Carbon Neutral Future
17686 004SEM (2 Units)Wait List (2 / 199) 18 / 18Ethan HeilMoWe 2:00pm - 2:50pmThe Rotunda Room 152
 Do you wonder how we can begin to address the existential threat of climate change? Decarbonization describes the broad set of strategies to do just that. Designing a Carbon Neutral Future is an interactive seminar designed to engage students in the rapidly evolving concept of economy-wide decarbonization - and will directly support decarbonization in the local community.