UVa Class Schedules (Unofficial, Lou's List v2.10)   New Features
Schedule of Classes with Additional Descriptions - Fall 2021
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African-American and African Studies
 AAS 3500Intermediate Seminar in African-American & African Studies
 Introduction to Black Performance Studies
 Black Performance Theory
Fall 2021  18831 001SEM (3 Units)Open17 / 20Ashon CrawleyWe 3:30pm - 6:00pmWilson Hall 238
 "Don't be performative!" A word often said to mean fake, phony, inauthentic, untrue. In this course we will discuss the history of the concept of "performative". We will also discuss the role of performance to Black popular, intellectual and spiritual culture. We will engage fiction, poetry, music, theater , activism and how these practices are various attempts to practice blackness as a living, breathing existence.
 Making a Monster:Race & Monstrosity US Imagination
Fall 2021  18832 002SEM (3 Units)Open21 / 22Janee MosesTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmClemons Library 320
 How has mainstream, white audiences’ “fictitious” fear of angry black masses impacted the genres of horror film, fantasy, and science fiction? This seminar, which begins with D.W. Griffith’s Birth of a Nation (1915), explores the making of racialized and gendered monsters in the aftermath of enslavement in the American cultural imagination through literature and film of the 19th and 20th centuries. Using the intervention of Christina Sharpe’s Monstrous Intimacies (2010) concerning the contemporary repetition of familiar and familial violence that shaped black and white life during colonial slavery, we will explore difference and otherness based on race, gender, sexuality, and power to consider the potential for the monster and the non-monster to be identified through formulations that resemble black and white subjects. The course ends with the critically acclaimed film, Get Out (2017), and the push for further conversations about the ways in which monstrosity and otherness continues to be recognizably black. Throughout the semester, students will learn to place literature and film into their corresponding historical contexts and complicate concepts of racial and national identities with attention to America’s histories of monstrous intimacies. [Fulfills: Humanities; Race &Pol]
 Race, Ethnicity, and Health in the US
Fall 2021  21019 012SEM (3 Units)Open17 / 18Liana RichardsonTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amContact Department
 Why are African-American women 71% more likely than white women to die from cervical cancer, and 243% more likely to die of pregnancy- or postpartum-related complications? Why have Black, Hispanic/Latino, and Native Americans been disproportionately affected by the SARS-CoV-2 virus? In this course, we will examine the relationships between “race”/ethnicity, other axes of difference, and health disparities in the United States. Drawing from research in a variety of disciplines, including epidemiology, demography, and sociology, we will examine how health is distributed by race/ethnicity, as well as the social, economic, and political factors that give rise to the differential distribution of health across racial/ethnic groups. We also will discuss whether contemporary health promotion and disease prevention policies are sufficient to address racial/ethnic disparities in health and why other potentially more impactful policies have not been pursued. Fulfills: Social Science/History; Race & Politics; 3000-level.
 AAS 3645Musical Fictions
Fall 2021  19788 001SEM (3 Units)Open 10 / 14 (21 / 24)Njelle HamiltonTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 395
 Cross-listed with ENGL3560. Fulfills: Humanities requirement for the AAS major
 An exploration of the genre of the contemporary musical novel and why writers and readers are so intrigued by the figure of the musician as a literary trope. Pairing close listening and music theory with close reading of important blues, jazz, reggae, mambo, calypso and rock novels set in the U.S., U.K, Jamaica, Trinidad, France, and Germany, we will consider how novelists attempt to record the soul, lyrics, and structure of music, not on wax, but in novelistic prose, and what kinds of cultural baggage and aesthetic conventions particular music forms bring to the novel form. The topical nature of many of these issues, songs, and novels will hopefully inspire you to thought-provoking class discussions, critical response papers, and final papers that push against the “fictions” and assumptions of musicians and novelists alike.
 AAS 4570Advanced Research Seminar in African-American & African Studies
 Music of the Black Atlantic
Fall 2021  20330 001SEM (3 Units)Open 8 / 18 (8 / 18)Njelle HamiltonTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmDell 1 104
 Listen: some of us haven’t left our houses/town/state in a year and we can’t safely go on cruises right now. So come vibe to a carnival of music as we travel the major ports of call from which key Black music forms emerged: New Orleans (jazz and blues); Kingston (reggae and dub); Rio de Janeiro (samba and bossa nova); Lagos (highlife and afrobeat); London/Brixton (lovers rock and grime). Our in-class activities will be a combination of dedicated listening sessions (DJ-NJ at the Spotify turntable); reading about music; and analyzing musical novels, plays, TV shows and films and their soundtracks. We’ll have spirited discussions on Deck 5 about George Wolfe’s jazz-origins play Jelly’s Last Jam, Marcia Douglas’s reggae novel The Marvellous Equations of the Dread, Netflix’s bossa nova romper Girls from Ipanema, Broadway’s booty-shaking Fela!, Steve McQueen’s slow burning Lovers Rock, and ride Kodwo Eshun’s mind-bending sonic spaceship to the Afrofuture. By the time our imaginary cruise ship returns to port at the end of the semester, you will be well equipped to craft a research paper that applies black sound studies approaches and methods to whatever ports, sounds or texts fired your imagination and curiosity. See you aboard! Fulfills: Humanities; 4000-level research
American Studies
 AMST 2559New Course in American Studies
 War and Memory in Asian American Literature
Fall 2021  18998 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 18 / 20Joseph WeiTu 3:30pm - 6:00pmNew Cabell Hall 058
 This course explores how Asian American writers confront the memory of war. We'll focus on literary representations of the Philippine-American War, Japanese American incarceration, the Korean War, and Vietnam War by "postmemory" Asian American writers, i.e., the generation after who write not through direct recollection but through an imaginative investment and creation. What forms of representation do these writers invent to remember the war and uncover the silences and gaps in the historical record? What are the ethical and political limits of memorializing a war one did not directly live through? And what role does postmemory serve for collective identification, mourning, reckoning, and reconstruction around these wars? Authors we'll read include: Carlos Bulosan, Gina Apostol, Mitsuye Yamada, Brandon Shimoda, Susan Choi, Don Mee Choi, Viet Thanh Nguyen, lê thị diễm thúy, Kosal Khiev, Mai Der Vang, Anthony Veasna So.
 AMST 3221Hands-On Public History: Slavery and Reconstruction
 Hands-On Public History
Website  13775 001SEM (3 Units)Open 12 / 16Lisa GoffTh 3:30pm - 6:00pmNew Cabell Hall 032
 MANDATORY FIELD TRIPS AND ATTENDANCE POLICY. MAKE SURE YOU CAN GO TO ALL THREE BEFORE SIGNING UP FOR CLASS: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1XFOT8EL08s0_zglAOWmrWQFT43IIXl5qSPj_JBq3WFc/edit. This is a year-long course through the college's Civic and Community Engagement Program. You have the option of taking it both fall and spring semesters.
 THIS CLASS FULFILLS THREE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE AMST MAJOR: TRANSNATIONAL/REGIONAL, RACE/ETHNICITY, AND HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES. This year-long class is a part of a 3-year collaboration with local community groups to conduct historical research into African American history in central Virginia. Examples of past projects here: https://hoph-2020-f-oss.hub.arcgis.com/. Students will conduct fieldwork near Charlottesville, and will investigate past and current examples of the public history of slavery and Reconstruction at sites like Monticello and Montpelier, as well as lesser known sites. We will work together with community organizations and Black churches to geolocate undocumented sites of African American history, including gravesites; and create digital Story Maps that seek to unearth the hidden histories of enslaved and free African Americans in the 19th and early 20th centuries—and the legacies of those histories today. ** Please note that students are strongly encouraged to take the class in both the fall and spring semesters. ** WHAT IS PUBLIC HISTORY? Public history is history that is delivered to a non-academic audience, often at historic sites, museums, archives, and on digital platforms. Some films, podcasts, fiction, and poetry might also be considered public history. This course will use all of those formats to investigate how the history of slavery in central Virginia is presented to the public. We will critique how historic sites in the Charlottesville area, including the university, interpret this history, and identify the political and social impacts of these interpretations. Field trips to local and regional historic sites will be a key (and hopefully enjoyable) component of this class. We'll visit Montpelier and Monticello, for example, as well as Richmond, where we'll see Kehinde Wiley's powerful new statue, Rumors of War. But critique is not the only, or even the most important goal of our class. Students will collaborate with local community groups, WTJU, and Scholars Lab to produce podcasts and digital maps that fill in some of the gaps in the public history of slavery and its legacies in Charlottesville and surrounding counties--contributing, in some small way, to a more just and comprehensive public history. PLEASE NOTE: Class participation will play a very large role in student assessment, as will the final project and all the assignments leading up to it. Several (2-3) field trips will be scheduled on weekends; these are all mandatory. Dates will be announced at the first class meeting.
 AMST 3559New Course in American Studies
 Moving On: Migration in/to US
Fall 2021  19007 004Lecture (3 Units)Open 23 / 24 (23 / 24)Lisa GoffTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmMaury Hall 113
 STUDENTS JOINING LATE MUST COMPLETE ALL MAKE-UP WORK BY SEPT. 21, AND PLAN TO MISS NO MORE CLASSES. SEE ATTENDANCE, OTHER POLICIES ON SYLLABUS: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1FGUYT2rryWZ71WOLeNL3QDLJEna2zZVCzuwOFfht4As/edit
 This class examines the history of voluntary, coerced, and forced migration in the U.S., tracing the paths of migrating groups and their impact on urban, suburban, and rural landscapes. We’ll dig for cultural clues to changing attitudes about migration over time. Photographs, videos, books, movies, government records, poems, podcasts, paintings, comic strips, museums, manifestos: you name it, we’ll analyze it for this class.
Anthropology
 ANTH 2541Topics in Linguistics
 French Creole Language Structures
Fall 2021  20814 002Lecture (3 Units)Open 10 / 30Nathan WendteTh 5:00pm - 7:30pmWilson Hall 214
 This course examines the similarities and differences in phonology, morphology, and syntax among those creole languages whose primary lexicon is derived from French. We also consider broader linguistic and anthropological issues concerning creoles. For example, while some have claimed that creoles exist as a typologically distinct class of languages, others have argued that their only commonality is their socio-histories. Familiarity with French, though not required, will be useful.
 ANTH 3541Topics in Linguistics
 Language Change
Fall 2021  20807 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 7 / 30Nathan WendteTuTh 8:00am - 9:15amNew Cabell Hall 383
 Along the span of history and across the globe, the one constant of human language is change. This course introduces the study and analysis of language change over time in a variety of domains and contexts. Students will learn how to identify and decode processes and results of historical language change and apply these skills to analyze data bearing on relationships and contacts between different languages and their speakers.
Arts Administration
 ARAD 1550Topics in Arts Administration
 Art Business of Contemporary Art
Fall 2021  19753 001Lecture (1 Units)Open 12 / 15George Sampson and Leslie Wade (CLAS 2022)Mo 11:00am - 12:30pmFayerweather Hall 208
 What does “art” mean in the context of a multi-billion-dollar industry? Is art defined by the artist or the consumer? Will brick and mortar establishments be affected by the rise of the "Instagram Artist"? Is the Art Business one that is only available to the 1%; why is this? Is there validity to the "starving artist" stereotype, and what does it mean to support or reject that image? In this class, we will survey various sectors of the market, including galleries, auction houses, museums, and the studios and workshops from which art originates, and map the ways which art moves through these vectors. Guest speakers – working artists, professors, and gallery/museum professionals – will supplement current events articles and selected readings, giving you various perspectives from which to learn about how this industry functions. Through discussions, group projects, and an individual research project, you will be able to present your own understanding of the interplay between artist and market, and synthesize your ideas with those of your peers. Additionally, we will look extensively at the plight of the working artist, paying attention to the barriers to entry into the market, what the qualifiers for "success" are for an artist, and how established artists market themselves in today's tech and social media centric world. Together, we will debate various ethical questions and use current events and articles to support our opinions. From these questions, you'll gain a foundational knowledge of the Art Business, how it can be improved, and how you can fit into the equation professionally.
 ARAD 3100Principles and Practices of Arts Administration
Fall 2021  11898 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 89 / 90George SampsonTuTh 5:00pm - 6:15pmCampbell Hall 160
 Overview: Arts Administration (ARAD) is a multidisciplinary field at the crossroads of human creativity and market. This survey course includes managing arts & cultural organizations, the entertainment industry, and how artists and other creative people interface with the world. Students should think of themselves as research colleagues with faculty, where a creative outlook and understanding of the artistic process prepares us for a rapidly changing world. We consider all disciplines of visual and performing arts, both non-profit and for-profit. Principles of theory examine the role of the arts in society. Practices showcase the crossroads of Arts Admin, where Tools of Business: management, marketing, financial accounting, operations and negotiations meet Tools of Community Building: fundraising, development, education, outreach, volunteerism, public policy and partnerships, and Tools of Creativity: curiosity, intuition, improvisation, transdisciplinary thinking, abductive reasoning, openness to experience and to serendipity. Artistic Administrators possess integrated management / financial skills, sympathetic knowledge of one or more art forms, sensitivity to creative visions / processes and to the dynamics of the communities served. This course is designed to be of value to artists and creative people, to patrons, collectors, educators and current student leaders on Grounds.
 ARAD 4050Arts Marketing Theory and Practice
Fall 2021  13238 001SEM (3 Units)Permission 15 / 15Maran GarlandWe 4:00pm - 6:30pmFayerweather Hall 206
 Arts Administration is an interdisciplinary field which studies the practical management of arts, cultural, and entertainment organizations and businesses but also raises questions about the role of the arts in our society. The metaphor of a crossroads is useful to illustrate the meeting of commerce and art, where an artistic creation seeks an audience and the artist and community interact. The Arts Marketer is a key animator of this crossroads, balancing the needs and desires of the audience with the necessity to nurture and facilitate artists and their work. As an important interpreter of the work, the marketer uses both the tools of Business: management, marketing, finance, operations, and negotiation; and the tools of Community Building: fundraising, development, education, outreach, volunteerism, public policy, and partnerships, to create thriving cultural spaces between artists and audiences. This class will lay a foundation of traditional arts marketing while incorporating 21st-century needs to balance innovative digital communication with strategies to attract and engage new audience through relevance, accessibility, and interactivity. In this course, students will explore arts marketing theory and practice through readings, class discussion, guest lectures, case studies, and assignments related to local arts and cultural organizations. Group work and presentations will complement individual work. The course is designed to be highly participatory, with class discussion and in-class assignments solidifying an understanding of concepts introduced through readings. Project work will extend beyond the classroom. This course will connect students to arts organizations in the Charlottesville/Albemarle community with guest lecturers and projects. Upon course completion, students will understand core concepts of arts marketing and be able to apply them to current issues in the field by producing a final arts marketing plan rooted in research, strategy, analysis, and creativity.
 ARAD 4070Introduction to Design Thinking
Fall 2021  12332 001Lecture (3 Units)Permission 19 / 20George SampsonTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmFayerweather Hall 206
 Overview and Course Goal: Design is the hub of a wheel rather than a link in a chain. Design Thinking (DT) is a human-centered way of approaching issues and opportunities which uses and combines information from many knowledge domains. The technique encourages abductive reasoning (leaps of logic) as well as more common deductive and inductive reasoning. Experiencing interplay between group creativity and individual creativity is a course theme. DT is a process distinguished in part by using empathy gained through careful listening & observation as a core component. We will use experiential learning to illustrate. Since I launched an early DT course in the School of Architecture in 2010-11, DT has grown to be taught in several schools at UVA. My approach is based less on problem solving and product development and more on 50+ years of presenting artists and the lessons I have tried to learn from them. Maintaining an open mind is one such practice. Flipping conventional thinking is another. Our version of DT is less an intrusion of business purposes into the artistic practice of design and more the extrusion of artists’ creative processes into everyday life. Examples of Design Thinking include Steve Jobs of Apple, John Lasseter of Pixar, MIT‘s Media Lab, VCU’s Brand Center and design firm IDEO. We have alumnae involved with them all. Design Thinkers use empathic listening to understand context, creativity to generate insights and analysis to fit insights to context. Prototypes are then built in an iterative process of refinements until a successful result providing exceptional experiences is obtained. The course goal is to augment our process of thinking by facilitating a creative habit of mind. We strive to construct a creative process you can carry with you wherever you go.
History of Art and Architecture
 ARAH 9565Seminar in Art Theory, Comparative & Other Topics
 Relief
Fall 2021  18585 001SEM (3 Units)Open3 / 12Sarah BetzerTu 1:00pm - 3:30pmFayerweather Hall 206
 This seminar engages with broad questions of medium and intermediality, or the ostensible fixity or blurring of artistic forms and modes most often summoned by the arts of painting and sculpture. At the center of our inquiry is relief, an unruly category that necessarily brokered an interaction between the "pictorial" and "spatial" arts. Drawing upon key art theoretical texts and a range of evocative episodes from a long and broad history of art, we will further anchor our examination of relief relative to the distinct sub-field interests of seminar participants. The categories of painting and sculpture have proved formative for the conceptualization of art making in the long European tradition, and the undoing of these distinctions in the 20th century has provided a foundational telos for art historical narratives of modernism. Might an account of relief offer a disruption to established narrative of the ostensibly radical practices of twentieth-century 'intermediality'?
Architecture
 ARCH 3500Special Topics in Architecture
 _mpathic design 6D: Interpreting Edankraal
 Edankraal en Route:Reviving an African – American Space of Cultural Exchange in Segregated Lynchburg
Fall 2021  19767 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed8 / 8 (23 / 30)Elgin Cleckley+1TuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmCampbell Hall 302
 This cross-disciplinary format has attracted students in past iterations from History, American Studies, Arts Administration, Studio Art, Art History, English and all departments of the School of Architecture. No previous design experience is required. This course allows for comprehensive understanding of the skills necessary for interpretation and exhibition design from experienced professors.
 This interdisciplinary course will employ multiple strategies of design and interpretation to create an architectural, landscape, and literary digital project to enhance access to and knowledge of the Anne Spencer House and Garden. Anne Bethel Spencer (February 6, 1882 – July 27, 1975) was a renowned Harlem Renaissance poet, civil rights activist, and gardener whose house and garden in Lynchburg, VA is on the National Register of Historic Places. Her papers are housed in Special Collections at the University of Virginia, thus providing an unrivaled opportunity for interdisciplinary research into virtual exhibit design, archival resources, and historic house interpretation with faculty from the departments of Architecture, Architectural History and English. The Spencers’ house and garden was an urban center of rest, gathering, and Black creativity for Black intellectual and cultural figures who stayed in the house. In this course, students will develop and implement an augmented virtual tour of the house and garden in tandem with stakeholders, its networks of visitors, and the social and writing practices linked to the site.
Architectural History
 ARH 4591Undergraduate Seminar in the History of Architecture
 _mpathic design 6D: Interpreting Edankraal
 Edankraal en Route:Reviving an African – American Space of Cultural Exchange in Segregated Lynchburg
Fall 2021  18851 001SEM (3 Units)Closed 5 / 5 (23 / 30)Elgin Cleckley+1TuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmCampbell Hall 302
 This cross-disciplinary format has attracted students in past iterations from History, American Studies, Arts Administration, Studio Art, Art History, English and all departments of the School of Architecture. No previous design experience is required. This course allows for comprehensive understanding of the skills necessary for interpretation and exhibition design from experienced professors.
 This interdisciplinary course will employ multiple strategies of design and interpretation to create an architectural, landscape, and literary digital project to enhance access to and knowledge of the Anne Spencer House and Garden. Anne Bethel Spencer (February 6, 1882 – July 27, 1975) was a renowned Harlem Renaissance poet, civil rights activist, and gardener whose house and garden in Lynchburg, VA is on the National Register of Historic Places. Her papers are housed in Special Collections at the University of Virginia, thus providing an unrivaled opportunity for interdisciplinary research into virtual exhibit design, archival resources, and historic house interpretation with faculty from the departments of Architecture, Architectural History and English. The Spencers’ house and garden was an urban center of rest, gathering, and Black creativity for Black intellectual and cultural figures who stayed in the house. In this course, students will develop and implement an augmented virtual tour of the house and garden in tandem with stakeholders, its networks of visitors, and the social and writing practices linked to the site.
 ARH 5500Selected Topics in Architectural History
 _mpathic Design 6D: Interpreting Edankraal
 Edankraal en Route:Reviving an African – American Space of Cultural Exchange in Segregated Lynchburg
Fall 2021  18850 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed 5 / 5 (23 / 30)Elgin Cleckley+1TuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmCampbell Hall 302
 This cross-disciplinary format has attracted students in past iterations from History, American Studies, Arts Administration, Studio Art, Art History, English and all departments of the School of Architecture. No previous design experience is required. This course allows for comprehensive understanding of the skills necessary for interpretation and exhibition design from experienced professors.
 This interdisciplinary course will employ multiple strategies of design and interpretation to create an architectural, landscape, and literary digital project to enhance access to and knowledge of the Anne Spencer House and Garden. Anne Bethel Spencer (February 6, 1882 – July 27, 1975) was a renowned Harlem Renaissance poet, civil rights activist, and gardener whose house and garden in Lynchburg, VA is on the National Register of Historic Places. Her papers are housed in Special Collections at the University of Virginia, thus providing an unrivaled opportunity for interdisciplinary research into virtual exhibit design, archival resources, and historic house interpretation with faculty from the departments of Architecture, Architectural History and English. The Spencers’ house and garden was an urban center of rest, gathering, and Black creativity for Black intellectual and cultural figures who stayed in the house. In this course, students will develop and implement an augmented virtual tour of the house and garden in tandem with stakeholders, its networks of visitors, and the social and writing practices linked to the site.
 ARH 8001Methods in Architectural History
Fall 2021  10020 001SEM (3 Units)Closed 14 / 12Sheila CraneTh 1:00pm - 3:30pmCampbell Hall 325
 This seminar is concerned with histories and practices of architectural history. How have investigations into histories and ideas about the built environment been situated in relationship to the disciplines of art history, heritage/historic preservation, architectural training and practice, as well as adjacent disciplines in the design fields, the humanities, and the social sciences? How have architectural historians and theorists defined their task, their research questions, their analytic methods, and their theoretical touchstones? Readings include work that has helped to shape the discipline of architectural history, broadly construed, as well as notable recent publications that address current and emergent concerns. The course aims to introduce the broad lines of inquiry shaping the discipline and to allow students to position their own work in relation to past and present debates. In addition to required readings and weekly discussions, you will have the opportunity to undertake a series of short writing assignments and to develop a state of the field/historiographical essay on a topic of your choosing.
History of Art
 ARTH 1503Art and the Premodern World
 Art and Power
Fall 2021  14221 100Lecture (3 Units)Closed 60 / 60Dylan RogersMoWe 11:00am - 11:50amCampbell Hall 160
 It is often said that the victors write history—and with that, they also narrated their stories in physical objects and built landscapes. Art and architecture have their own innate ability to express the identity and desires of its creators and consumers. But they can also assert power, dominance, and control. This semester, we will explore the connections between art and power, examining the material remains of cultures stretching the borders of the Mediterranean (from ancient Iran and Egypt to Renaissance Italy)—in order to understand better how, over time, art and architecture can demonstrate power in a number of ways—both positively and negatively. Using this foundation, we will also begin to probe how similar strategies are used today in our own world. A number of themes will be addressed, including: expressions of the divine; monumentality; commemoration; kingship; propaganda. We will see these themes in art, ranging from sculpture, painted surfaces, to portable objects (like coins), and architecture—from elite palaces to everyday spaces. Our goal is to explore expressions of power in context—coming to a better understanding of how they impacted daily lives in the past and today
 ARTH 1505Art and the Modern World
 From Renaissance to Modern and Beyond
Fall 2021  12827 100Lecture (3 Units)Closed 44 / 45Lawrence GoeddeMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmCampbell Hall 160
 Why does the art of the modern world look the way it does? How do you understand art forms that defy commonplace ideas that art should depict known people, places, and things? Why are Renaissance artists like Leonardo, Raphael, and Michelangelo so famous? Who was Rembrandt and why is his work so celebrated? What is Impressionism and why is it so popular? What is abstract art about and how do you understand its meaning? This course provides students with ways of thinking about questions like these, as it explores the story of art in Europe and America from the early Renaissance to the art of the contemporary world. It introduces students to ways of interpreting images, to common concepts and terms used to discuss styles and art movements, and to the links between art and major historical, religious, and cultural developments. After this course, students will find art museums much more comprehensible and enjoyable. Quizzes, and midterm and final exams
 ARTH 1507Art and Global Cultures
 Art and the Body
Website  18586 100Lecture (3 Units)Open 51 / 55Giulia PaolettiMoWe 12:00pm - 12:50pmCampbell Hall 160
 Regardless of time or geography, the human body is among the most widely represented subjects in art. This course considers artists from around the world who have drawn, painted, sculpted, performed and filmed the human body. We will investigate how specific portrayals of the body relate to cultural, historical and political contexts, as well as what power dynamics are inherent to forms of looking and representing the body. In addition to challenging us to rethink the perception of our own and other bodies, the course will provide a foundation on how to look and talk about visual arts more generally. Topics include: depicting the divine, the naked and the nude, gender and the politics of representation, the body as machine, representing race, bodily matters, healing and hurting, the post-human body.
 ARTH 2153Romanesque and Gothic Art
Fall 2021  18593 100Lecture (4 Units)Open 29 / 60Eric Ramirez-WeaverTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmCampbell Hall 160
 COURSE DESCRIPTION: The medieval monk, Raoul Glaber, described Europe in the year 1000 as a place of Christian renewal in which the continent “…[was] clothing herself everywhere in a white garment of churches.” From the Romanesque churches along the Pilgrimage Routes to the new Gothic architecture at St. Denis outside Paris and on to late medieval artistic production in Prague, this course examines profound and visually arresting expressions of medieval piety, devotion, and power made by artists from roughly 1000-1500. In this class, both sacred and secular artworks supply important records of the philosophical, theological, political, and scientific beliefs espoused by their different patrons from disparate time periods and the artists they commissioned to translate their visions into churches, castles, liturgical objects, sculptures, stained glass, tapestries, household items, and illuminated manuscripts. Throughout our investigations, particular attention will be paid to the contributions of important medieval women, who rose above social inequalities, and demonstrated their power and prestige through cultivated programs of patronage.
 ARTH 2271Northern Renaissance Art
Fall 2021  14229 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 45 / 50Lawrence GoeddeTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmCampbell Hall 160
 Lectures on the extraordinary traditions of painting and printmaking produced in Northern Europe from about 1400 to 1580, at the same time as the now more celebrated works of the Italian Renaissance. Working in the Low Countries, Germany, and France, artists produced works of great visual beauty, intricate detail, and intellectual complexity aimed at fostering piety and devotion, but also exploring human behavior and satirizing human folly, particularly as regards social class and gender roles. Print technology played a critical role in these developments as well as in mediating the explosive impact of the Reformation on European art and culture. Major artists covered include Jan van Eyck, Hans Memling, Hieronymus Bosch, Albrecht Dürer, and Pieter Bruegel the Elder. Quizzes, and midterm and final exams.
 ARTH 2861East Asian Art
Fall 2021  18598 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 49 / 50Dorothy WongMoWe 5:00pm - 6:15pmCampbell Hall 160
 This course is a general introduction to the artistic traditions of China, Korea, and Japan from the prehistoric period to the modern era. Major topics include funerary art, Buddhist art, and later court and secular art. The course seeks to understand artistic forms in relation to technology, political and religious beliefs, and social and historical contexts. It also introduces the major philosophic and religious traditions—Confucianism, Daoism, Shinto, and Buddhism—that have shaped cultural and aesthetic ideals of East Asia. The lectures survey major monuments and the fundamental concepts behind their creation.
 ARTH 3591Art History Colloquium
 Art, Death, and Ritual: Mysteries of Ancient China
Fall 2021  14455 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 14 / 15 (14 / 15)Dorothy WongMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmFayerweather Hall 206
 Through the close study of well-documented archaeological sites of ancient China, which reveal ritual practices as well as astonishing grave goods that include spectacular jades and bronzes, this course explores the Chinese notions of afterlife, ancestor worship, state ritual, and immortality cults. The material culture and beliefs and practices examined form a backdrop to understanding the period when ancient Chinese civilization was formed.
 Global Photography: Decolonizing the Gaze
Website  14234 002Lecture (3 Units)Open 14 / 15Giulia PaolettiTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmFayerweather Hall 208
 While the camera has since its inception been described as an essentially Western invention and a tool of imperialism, this apparatus was appropriated across the globe almost simultaneously, from South Africa to India, from China to Mexico. In this course we will explore photography's histories, theories and practices centering the gaze, voice and experience of those working outside the West, in what Shahidul Alam prefers to call the “majority world.” Topics include: photography and imperialism; ethics of looking; decolonizing practices; gender and photography; beyond photography.
 Art of the 1990s
Fall 2021  18601 003Lecture (3 Units)Open 14 / 15Christa RobbinsTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmFayerweather Hall 215
 The Art of the 1990s (ARTH 3591--003), Professor Christa Noel Robbins In this art history colloquium, we will explore and investigate the art of the nineties in a range of socio-political contexts. The nineties are generally regarded as an important turning point in the history of contemporary art, marked by a turn away from both the spectacular works of the 1980s and the formalist analytics of the 1960s and 1970s. Themes and topics that we will focus on include the role of the arts in the “culture wars,” the centering of “identity politics” in art discourse and practice, a shift away from the conceptual practices of the 1960s and toward “relational aesthetics,” and a rising interest, in both the academic and commercial spheres, in so-called “global art.” Class time will be split between lecture and discussion and students will have the opportunity to develop their own research projects. This class satisfies the second writing requirement.
 Sex and the Ancient City
Fall 2021  18602 004Lecture (3 Units)Closed 15 / 15Dylan RogersTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmFayerweather Hall 208
 Let’s talk about sex. Issues related to sexuality and gender permeate every culture and society from any time period—whether or not they wish to talk about them. As such, this course examines art and architecture in the ancient Mediterranean, in order to explore how sex was conceptualized and understood by Greeks and Romans. Using a variety of art historical and archaeological evidence, from Greek vases to the painted walls of a brothel in Pompeii, we will explore a number of themes, including nudity and the body, gender, sexuality, homosexuality, virginity, prostitution, and marriage. Further, we examine modern notions of sexuality and gender (particularly in the US), in order to understand better how sex has changed over time. For example, what can Victorian taboos of the 19th century or RuPaul’s Drag Race today tell us about our own selves—and ancient Greeks and Romans?
 ARTH 4591Undergraduate Seminar in the History of Art
 Empathic Design 6D, Edankraal en Route
 Edankraal en Route Reviving an African – American Space of Cultural Exchange in Segregated Lynchburg
Fall 2021  19864 006SEM (3 Units)Open 2 / 5 (23 / 30)Elgin Cleckley+1TuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmCampbell Hall 302
 This cross-disciplinary format has attracted students in past iterations from History, American Studies, Arts Administration, Studio Art, Art History, English and all departments of the School of Architecture. No previous design experience is required. This course allows for comprehensive understanding of the skills necessary for interpretation and exhibition design from experienced professors.
 This interdisciplinary course will employ multiple strategies of design and interpretation to create an architectural, landscape, and literary digital project to enhance access to and knowledge of the Anne Spencer House and Garden. Anne Bethel Spencer (February 6, 1882 – July 27, 1975) was a renowned Harlem Renaissance poet, civil rights activist, and gardener whose house and garden in Lynchburg, VA is on the National Register of Historic Places. Her papers are housed in Special Collections at the University of Virginia, thus providing an unrivaled opportunity for interdisciplinary research into virtual exhibit design, archival resources, and historic house interpretation with faculty from the departments of Architecture, Architectural History and English. The Spencers’ house and garden was an urban center of rest, gathering, and Black creativity for Black intellectual and cultural figures who stayed in the house. In this course, students will develop and implement an augmented virtual tour of the house and garden in tandem with stakeholders, its networks of visitors, and the social and writing practices linked to the site.
American Sign Language
 ASL 3081History of the American Deaf Community
Fall 2021  19816 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 24 / 28 (24 / 28)Christopher KrentzMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 168
 Examines the history of deaf people in the United States over the last three centuries, with particular attention to the emergence and evolution of a community of Deaf people who share a distinct sign language and culture. We will read both primary texts from specific periods (by writers like Laurent Clerc and Alexander Graham Bell) and secondary sources (such as Douglas Baynton's Forbidden Signs and Carol Padden and Tom Humphries’ Inside Deaf Culture). We will also view a few historical films. Among other topics, we will consider how hearing society has treated deaf people and the reasons for this treatment; how deaf people have explained and advocated for themselves; how the deaf community complicates our understanding of linguistic and ethnic minorities and of disabled people in the United States; the impact of technology; and what changing constructions of deafness reveal about the history of American culture in general. The class will be taught in spoken English with an interpreter and has no prerequisite, though a background in ASL or in History might be helpful.
Biology
 BIOL 4012Evolution and Ecology of Infectious Diseases
Website  19814 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 38 / 40Amanda GibsonTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmMaury Hall 115
 In this course, we dive into our current understanding of the evolution and ecology of parasitic interactions through primary literature, modeling, and experimental design.  We cover the fundamentals of disease dynamics and the (co)evolution of host resistance and parasite virulence. We apply these ideas to modern problems to make sense of how human interventions, like drugs, vaccinations, and habitat destruction, might change the spread and evolution of parasites.  The topics we discuss have broad implications for public health, the sustainability of agricultural practices, and the conservation of biodiversity. Throughout, we will focus on generating and testing hypotheses, evaluating theoretical models with evidence, drawing parallels between diverse domains of life, and connecting evolutionary and ecological ideas to today’s past, present, and future epidemics.
 BIOL 4559New Course in Biology
 NextGen Sequencing: Minions the Microbe Detective
Fall 2021  19813 002Laboratory (3 Units)Closed 13 / 12Martin WuTh 1:00pm - 4:00pmContact Department
 Microbes rule. This course will teach microbial genomics using the cutting edge next-generation DNA sequencing technology and its applications to study microbes around us. Topics covered include microbial genomics, DNA sequencing and sequence analysis.
Civil Engineering
 CE 4015Construction Industry Workshop: Bringing Theory to Practice
Fall 2021  18795 001WKS (3 Units)Permission 9 / 20Diana Franco DuranMo 3:30pm - 6:00pmMechanical Engineering 305
 Each workshop will be hosted by one of our industry partners. Students will be empowered with real-world case studies that will challenge them to formulate strategies and make decisions, while they develop professional skills such as team management and collaboration with other construction-related disciplines. The course will provide students and recruiters with a chance to spend quality time getting to know each other in an informal, yet educational and professional setting. Students will have the opportunity to 1) work with project managers, field engineers, subject matter experts, etc., and 2) receive feedback from them.
 CE 6500Special Topics in Civil Engineering
 Construction Practice
Fall 2021  19799 600Lecture (3 Units)Open2 / 10Diana Franco DuranTBATBA
 This practicum course provides meaningful work experiences for students looking to obtain relevant construction field experience while pursuing their master's degree. Through an externship, students will get a true picture of the work context, real-life challenges, and the structure of a typical workday or week. Students will benefit from being exposed to office and fieldwork regularly, practicing engineers, and project managers. This course is intended for graduate students in Civil Engineering specializing in Construction Engineering and Management.
Commerce
 COMM 4559New Course in Commerce
 Finance and Society
Fall 2021  20078 002Lecture (3 Units)Open 10 / 25William WilhelmTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmRobertson Hall 254
 The course is open to both College and McIntire students. The only prerequisite is Econ 2010 (Microeconomics).
 Course Description: Financial markets play a central role in market economies, but they are complex, opaque, and prone to human error and misbehavior. The course addresses these social challenges by developing tools for economic, legal, and moral reasoning. The course is intended for a broad audience. Students who are not considering a career in finance will learn how to engage more effectively with public debate around financial markets. Students considering a career in finance will learn how to identify and more thoughtfully respond to conflicts and temptations endemic in financial markets.
Computer Science
 CS 4501Special Topics in Computer Science
 Privacy in the Internet Age
Website  16640 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 62 / 70Yixin SunMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmOlsson Hall 009
 This course provides an in-depth look into privacy issues on the Internet and introduces privacy enhancing technologies. We will cover topics such as anonymous communications, traffic analysis and location privacy. We will also examine the trade-offs between security and privacy, and the interactions with other fields such as machine learning and policy.
 Introduction to Software Analysis
Fall 2021  16649 002Lecture (3 Units)Open23 / 30Mary Lou SoffaTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmThornton Hall D222
 Disruptive shifts in software applications and software development environments create challenges to software reliability that need to be addressed to ensure software quality. We will explore various software development techniques including types of analysis and use of these techniques, including data flow analysis, program slicing, program repair, input generation, debugging, and dynamic execution. These topics will be addressed through lectures, assignments and projects. Prerequisites CS 2150 or CS 2501
 Machine Learning in Image Analysis
Fall 2021  17000 005Lecture (3 Units)Open 3 / 10 (45 / 70)Miaomiao ZhangMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmChemical Engineering Bldg 005
 This course focuses on an in-depth study of advanced topics and interests in image data analysis. Students will learn practical image techniques and gain mathematical fundamentals needed to build their own models for effective problem solving. Topics of image denoising, deformable image registration, numerical analysis, probabilistic modeling, data dimensionality reduction, and convolutional neural networks for image segmentation/classification will be covered. The main focus might change from semester to semester. The graduate students (ECE / CS 6501) will be given additional programming tasks and more advanced theoretical questions.
 CS 6160Theory of Computation
Website  18909 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 34 / 38Mohammad MahmoodyFr 1:00pm - 3:45pmRice Hall 340
 The course description pulled form SIS is outdated. See the syllabus URL below for full description of the class.
 CS 6501Special Topics in Computer Science
 Autonomous Mobile Robots
Website  16934 012Lecture (3 Units)Closed 11 / 10 (40 / 40)Nicola BezzoWe 12:30pm - 1:45pmRice Hall 120
 Nicola BezzoTu 5:00pm - 6:15pmOlsson Hall 011
 Have you ever wonder how a google car or a Mars rover work? Or how a drone can fly autonomously and track an object on the ground? ...Then, this is the class for you!
 Have you ever wonder how a google car work? Or how a drone can fly autonomously? Then, this is the class for you. The objective of this course is to provide the basic concepts and algorithms required to develop mobile robots that act autonomously in complex environments. The main emphasis is on mobile robot locomotion and kinematics, control, sensing, localization, mapping, path planning, and motion planning. The class is organized in lectures on Tuesday and labs on Wednesday where you will have the chance to program state-of-the-art ground and aerial vehicles! Please note that this class is combined in Systems Eng (SYS 6581), Electrical and Computer Eng (ECE 6501), and Computer Science (CS 6501). In case one section is close, please try to enroll in any of the other sections.
Electrical and Computer Engineering
 ECE 3501Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering
 Quantum Mechanics for Engineering and Computing
Fall 2021  16634 001Lecture (3 Units)Open14 / 40Andreas BelingTuTh 5:00pm - 6:15pmThornton Hall E304
 Prerequisites: APMA 1110 - Single Variable Calculus II, APMA 2120 - Multivariable Calculus, PHYS 1425 - General Physics I: Mechanics, Thermodynamics Note: PHYS 1425 and APMA 2130 can be taken at the same time with this course. Only a small fraction of the content in these two courses will be used in this quantum class.
 Quantum mechanics is one of the most important discoveries in the 20th century and has reshaped today's science and technology. The rapid development in quantum computation and information is calling for a revolution in engineering and computation. Quantum information and quantum computing is fundamentally different from classical computers. In order to understand how a quantum computer works, we will review the birth of quantum mechanics and introduce the basic ideas and principles of quantum mechanics. The fundamental concepts in quantum information and computing, such as qubit, entanglement and squeezing, will be discussed. Finally, we will take a quick look at the physics platform candidates for quantum computing implementation, and the IBM Q quantum computing resources.
 ECE 6501Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering
 Autonomous Mobile Robots
Website  16204 002Lecture (3 Units)Closed 18 / 17 (40 / 40)Nicola BezzoWe 12:30pm - 1:45pmRice Hall 120
 Nicola BezzoTu 5:00pm - 6:15pmOlsson Hall 011
 Have you ever wonder how a google car or a Mars rover work? Or how a drone can fly autonomously and track an object on the ground? ...Then, this is the class for you!
 Have you ever wonder how a google car work? Or how a drone can fly autonomously? Then, this is the class for you. The objective of this course is to provide the basic concepts and algorithms required to develop mobile robots that act autonomously in complex environments. The main emphasis is on mobile robot locomotion and kinematics, control, sensing, localization, mapping, path planning, and motion planning.
Education-Leadership, Foundations, and Policy
 EDLF 4620International Human Rights Activism and Education
Fall 2021  15378 1SEM (3 Units)Open16 / 30Andrew FrankelMoWe 9:30am - 10:45amWeb-Based Course
 MW 9:30-10:45, Online; at least partially synchronous. This course will explore human rights issues globally, with a particular focus on China and Tibet.
Creative Writing
 ENCW 3310Intermediate Poetry Writing I
Fall 2021  13913 001WKS (3 Units)Permission 12 / 12Debra NystromWe 2:00pm - 4:30pmWeb-Based Course
 Instructor Permission is required for enrollment. Please apply for instructor permission through SIS. APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: writing sample of 4-5 poems with a cover sheet including name, year, email address, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting. Submit application IN A SINGLE DOCUMENT to Prof. Nystrom at dln8u@virginia.edu. Applications will be considered on a rolling basis as soon as registration opens. For full consideration, email your application as soon as possible. The final deadline will be noon, August 5. Classes do sometimes fill before the final submission deadline, but an effort will be made to hold space for transfer and study abroad students. The instructor will let all applicants know by late August.
 ENCW 3310 - Intermediate Poetry Writing [Please apply; Instructor Permission required] Wednesdays 2:00-4:30 Instructor: Debra Nystrom A weekly 2.5-hour class for students advanced beyond the level of ENCW 2300. Emphasis is on workshop of students' own poems, with focused writing exercises, relevant outside reading, and class discussions on issues of contemporary poetry and poetic craft. Short papers, participation in one group presentation, attendance at 2 poetry readings and a final poetry portfolio will be required. Instructor Permission is required for enrollment. Please apply for instructor permission through SIS. APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: writing sample of 4-5 poems with a cover sheet including name, year, email address, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting. Submit application IN A SINGLE DOCUMENT to Prof. Nystrom at dln8u@virginia.edu. Applications will be considered on a rolling basis as soon as registration opens. For full consideration, email your application as soon as possible. The final deadline will be noon, August 5. Classes do sometimes fill before the final submission deadline, but an effort will be made to hold space for transfer and study abroad students. The instructor will let all applicants know by late August.
 ENCW 3559New Course in Creative Writing
 Storytelling and Performance Prose
 Storytelling and Performance Prose
Fall 2021  20806 001Lecture (3 Units)Permission12 / 12Anna Martin-BeecherTuTh 5:00pm - 6:15pmBryan Hall 233
  Admission by Instructor Permission. Please send a sample of your prose writing (5-10 pages) and a brief statement (1 page max) about why this course interests you to am2aw@virginia.edu.
 This course is for students with experience of writing creatively, interested in writing fiction and other texts to be spoken aloud, embodied and shared with others in real time. Over the semester you will develop original stories, work on putting them ‘up on their feet’ in performance and explore how liveness and orality can challenge, shape and invigorate writing. We will also touch upon the oral roots of literature, reading works such as the 1001 Nights and the stories collected by the Brothers Grimm and the texts they have inspired. We will read, watch and discuss works of fiction, live-art, narrative comedy, spoken word and drama. You may be a fiction writer, interested in how spoken stories could attune your ear for language and narrative pattern, or writer and performer interested in marrying those two passions. Performance experience is not a requirement for this class, but a willingness to explore performance in a supportive atmosphere is essential.
 ENCW 3610Intermediate Fiction Writing
 Instructor Permission is required for enrollment unless you are an APLP student.
Fall 2021  13506 001WKS (3 Units)Permission 12 / 12Micheline MarcomTh 2:00pm - 4:30pmDawson's Row 1
 Instructor Permission is required for enrollment. In addition to applying via SIS please send me at mam5du@virginia.edu the following: cw course/s you've already taken; why you'd like to take this course; a bit about yourself/writing; a 5-7 page sample of your creative work. I will make final decisions by mid-August.
 ENCW 4350Advanced Nonfiction Writing
 THE TRUTHFUL IMAGINARIUM
Fall 2021  20066 001WKS (3 Units)Permission 13 / 12Jane AlisonMo 2:00pm - 4:30pmDawson's Row 1
 INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION REQUIRED. In addition to applying via SIS, please send me a note (jas2ad@virginia.edu) telling me who you are, what workshops you've taken, and what draws you to this one. Attach to your email a 10-page writing sample. I expect to read applications and admit the class by mid-August.
 An advanced class for ambitious students who want to explore how the personal essay dwells at the rich interface between their own minds and the world: that is, how their personal sensibility or “imaginarium” casts light, darkness, and color upon what they see and write. You’ll cycle through a series of micro-essays in which you’ll write about single subjects—an object, perhaps, or a room, color, animal, motion, body part—drawing on your most inventively associative mind, close observation, and researchable information. Working from these short pieces, you’ll develop a single longer personal or lyric essay that will be a literary site of imaginative but truthful exploration, inward and out. Most of this writing will be considered and discussed by the group, of course. Along the way you’ll also read many short examples of inventive, revelatory writing.
 ENCW 4550Topics in Literary Prose
 Boxcutters: Narrative Experiments
 BOXCUTTERS: NARRATIVE EXPERIMENTS
Fall 2021  12084 001SEM (3 Units)Permission 13 / 12Jane AlisonWe 2:00pm - 4:30pmDawson's Row 1
 Unless you are in the APLP, instructor permission required: please send me (jas2ad@virginia.edu) a note saying who you are and what draws you to this course, along with a writing sample (ten pages max).
 In this seminar we’ll explore writing that punctures “traditional” envelopes and ignores expectations of, say, classic realist prose. A memoir made of unlinked sentences; a novel in a box whose chapters you can read in any order; a personal essay in verse; a novella in numbered lines . . . “A Fictional Essay in 29 Tangos” (by Anne Carson) could be a catchphrase for the sort of work we’ll consider. How can windows open in what we write, whether working closer to the truthful or the imaginative ends of the spectrum, whether creating literature that’s more like music or more like a painting? When are experiments unreadable or soulless? In addition to weekly reading, you’ll write-play with regular exercises and produce a final critical-creative project. Among the authors we might read: Walter Abish, César Aira, Jenny Boully, Italo Calvino, Anne Carson, B. S. Johnson, Han Kang, John Keene, Laszlo Krasznahorkai, Edouard Levé, Clarice Lispector, David Markson, Ander Monson, Marie Ndiaye, Dorthe Nors, Marie Redonnet, Alain Robbe-Grillet, Nathalie Sarraute, Walter Sukenick, Eliot Weinberger.
 ENCW 4820Poetry Program Poetics
 Modern :: Postmodern
Fall 2021  11938 001SEM (3 Units)Permission12 / 12Brian TeareWe 2:00pm - 4:30pmNew Cabell Hall 594
 One hundred years ago, literature was in the middle of a revolution, a transformational time of cultural critique and formal experiment that kept pace with pointed social reappraisals of gender, Blackness, and sexuality. The 1920s in particular saw the publication of books central to our thinking about Modernism in English: from T.S. Eliot’s 1922 The Waste Land & Other Poems to Jean Toomer’s 1927 Cane, as well as Marianne Moore’s Observations, Langston Hughes’s The Weary Blues, Hart Crane’s White Buildings, Laura Riding’s The Close Chaplet, among many others. This course looks back to the 1920s from 2021 and asks: in what ways does the modern linger on in the postmodern? How has Modernist thinking about gender, Blackness, and sexuality influenced our own thinking? How has Modernist poetry in English influenced the forms explored and employed by contemporary USAmerican poetry? How can Modernist experiments be useful to us in the digital era? To help us answer these questions, we’ll read six Modernist classics in tandem with six books by contemporary poets whose work demonstrates both obvious and not-so-obvious formal and thematic engagements with poets from the 1920s. Throughout the semester we’ll engage in short critical and creative responses to these books, and for our final projects we’ll each write poems in dialogue with a Modernist predecessor whose poetics we find inspiring, challenging – and perhaps also infuriating!
 ENCW 4830Advanced Poetry Writing I
 Counter-Desecration
Fall 2021  13110 001WKS (3 Units)Permission 11 / 12Brian TeareTu 2:00pm - 4:30pmDawson's Row 1
 Instructor Permission is required for enrollment. Please request instructor permission through SIS and apply through email. APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: writing sample of 4-5 poems with a cover sheet including name, year, email address, major, prior workshop experience, and other workshops to which you are submitting. Submit application in a single document to Prof. Teare at bt5ps@virginia.edu. Applications will be considered on a rolling basis as soon as registration opens. For full consideration, email your application as soon as possible. The final deadline will be noon, August 5. Classes do sometimes fill before the final submission deadline, but an effort will be made to hold space for transfer and study abroad students. Prof. Teare will let all applicants know by late August.
 This advanced poetry workshop will encourage us to use words to counter the desecration of the world. Guided by the collectively authored lexical experiment Counter-Desecration: A Glossary for Writing Within the Anthropocene, our work together will include creating our own collective poetic lexicon that treats “words as portals to new species of wisdom.” We will also immerse ourselves in intersectional poetries that a) aim to counter the ruin of our planet and the commons of air and water and land we share with more-than-human beings, and b) defend our communities, quality of life, and psyches from further racist, misogynist, and homo- and transphobic harm. Rooted in ecologies biological and social and cultural, these poetries highlight the home in oikos and the making in poiesis and document the work it takes to make a home here in all its wonderful, awful complexity. Poets like CAConrad, Ross Gay, Brenda Hillman, Tommy Pico, Paisley Rekdal, Danielle Vogel, and Asiya Wadud foster and tend texts whose deep roots in multiple networks of relation work against the forces that attempt to unroot us. During the semester’s first half we’ll workshop short poems written in response to prompts designed to help us define our own sense of oikos, while the final workshop portion of the course will offer each of us the chance to expand upon that definition in longer manuscripts. Throughout the semester, in both critical discussions and workshops, we’ll discuss the conceptual, political, and poetic aspirations of the work we read, and explore the possibilities of coming together as poets to counter the violence around us.
 ENCW 7310MFA Poetry Workshop
Fall 2021  13109 001WKS (3 Units)Permission9 / 10Debra NystromMo 2:00pm - 4:30pmWeb-Based Course
 ENCW 7310 - MFA Poetry Workshop [Restricted to Instructor Permission] Mondays 2:00-4:30 Instructor: Debra Nystrom This is the graduate poetry writing workshop for the ten students enrolled in the first two years of the MFA Program in Poetry. The class will emphasize development of each student’s own work, with the help of peer commentary, and will also explore published texts, focusing on various aspects of poetic craft and creative growth. Students will regularly turn in poems for workshop and will be ready to engage deeply in discussion of each other’s work, as well as of outside reading. A final portfolio and participation in one group presentation will be required.
English-Literature
 ENGL 2500Introduction to Literary Studies
 Intro to Postcolonial Theory
Fall 2021  19851 001SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Tracey WangTuTh 5:00pm - 6:15pmBryan Hall 312
 What is postcolonial theory? What does it mean to analyze literary texts through a postcolonial lens? How does the study of anti- and post-colonial theory affect our reading practices? This course will consider some foundational works of anticolonial and postcolonial theory alongside contemporary literary works that grapple with the histories and politics of settler colonialism, imperialism, and racial capitalism. The course will begin with the major writings of three critical theorists (Césaire, Fanon, and Said) in order to give you a sense of the political, intellectual, and cultural debates that have shaped the theoretical discourses within the field of postcolonial studies. We will use their works as touchstones to examine the ideas and concepts in the narratives and prose of contemporary writers such as: Jamaica Kincaid, Maryse Condé, Chang Rae Lee, and Ocean Vuong amongst others. Together, these texts will give you the conceptual framework to think through and question global structures of power and domination. Requirements include: short reading reflections, two papers, and a presentation. This course fulfills the Second Writing Requirement.
 ENGL 2506Studies in Poetry
 The Challenge of Poetry
Fall 2021  18374 001SEM (3 Units)Open 17 / 18Matthew MartelloTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 415
 Is it true what they say—that poetry is “hard”? If so, how so? What should we do about it? This course will investigate the concept, the quality, and the experience of “difficulty” as it attaches to the literary work in general—and poetry in particular. We’ll tackle together some of the most notoriously “difficult” poems in the English language, locating problems, troubleshooting solutions, and developing a repertoire of analytical skills (e.g., scansion, recitation, interpretive reading, historical contextualization) fit for the toughest challenges culture has to offer. At every turn we’ll be guided by one question: In a world full of more accessible entertainments, *why* would we opt for the patient and sometimes strenuous attention demanded by great poetry? No prior experience with poetic analysis, no particular fondness for the difficult, only interest and occasional energy are required! Readings will include poems by William Blake, Robert Browning, Emily Dickinson, T.S. Eliot, John Ashbery, Ai, and others. Grades/assignments will include regular, often collaborative class participation and written responses of various lengths and kinds.
 Contemporary Poetry
 This course is for first-year students whose placement does not require them to take ENWR 1510.
Fall 2021  18434 003SEM (3 Units)Closed 11 / 0Jahan RamazaniMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 064
 In this seminar for first-year students not required to take ENWR 1510, we will examine an array of postwar idioms, forms, and movements. While devoting much of our attention to some of the most influential poetry from the second half of the twentieth century, we will also bring ourselves up to date by examining some of the best poems published in recent years by poets of diverse backgrounds. To hone our attention, we will focus on several specific genres, forms, or kinds of poetry, including sonnets, elegies, and poems about the visual arts. The seminar will emphasize the development of skills of close reading, critical thinking, and imaginative, knowledgeable writing about poetry.
 Introduction to Renaissance Poetry
Fall 2021  18575 004SEM (3 Units)Closed 15 / 15Rebecca RushTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amDawson's Row 1
 No prior knowledge of poetry, meter, or rhyme is expected. The only prerequisite is a willingness to read with attention—and a dictionary.
 Introduction to Renaissance Poetry I learned from him, that poetry, even that of the loftiest and, seemingly, that of the wildest odes, had a logic of its own, as severe as that of science; and more difficult, because more subtle, more complex, and dependent on more, and more fugitive causes. In the truly great poets, he would say, there is a reason assignable, not only for every word, but for the position of every word. --S.T. Coleridge, Biographia Literaria What is a poem? How does it work? What is its logic? How do we understand the connections between a poem’s formal elements (rhyme, meter, enjambment, etc.) and what Renaissance writers called its “conceit”—its governing ideas and images? In this course, we will explore the many Renaissance responses to these questions by reading poems by William Shakespeare, John Donne, Mary Wroth, Ben Jonson, Robert Herrick, John Milton, and Katherine Philips. This course is a guide to the art of reading poetry. Like any art, poetic reading requires training and practice. We will move slowly at first, sometimes reading only one poem per class, and will work together to develop the interpretive skills needed to unfold a poem. This course will also help you sharpen your skills as a writer. The first written assignments will be short, observational readings of poems that you will then turn into structured, argument-based papers. You will have the opportunity to revise one paper based on feedback from your instructor and your classmates. No prior knowledge of poetry, meter, or rhyme is expected. Lovers and haters of poetry are equally welcome (I love a challenge!) The only prerequisite is a willingness to read with attention—and a dictionary.
 ENGL 2508Studies in Fiction
 Science Fiction
Syllabus  18432 003SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Patricia SullivanMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 183
 Like to sink into a book that challenges the ways we think about other worlds, technology and science at their best and worst, parallel universes, speculative futures, human, aliens, artificial intelligences, cyborgs and more? We will read several books that are classified loosely as science fiction, though there may be some overlap with other genres such speculative fiction or climate fiction. Along the way, we will consider key novelistic conventions and aspects of the genre, questions of social relevance (science fiction is often read allegorically) and other various ways of interpreting the past, present, and future of science fiction. We will also practice close reading strategies, reflect on acts of literary interpretation through brief references to critical essays, inquire into some of the functions and effects of fictional narratives, and grapple with imaginative representations of worlds and times similar and not so similar to our own. Students will write regular reading responses and exploratory pieces, lead seminar discussions in groups, write three short essays, and take a brief final exam. This course fulfills the second writing (or writing-enhanced) requirement. ENGL2508 also prepares students interested in the English major for upper-level coursework in literature, though all majors are welcome.
 Gender and the Gothic
Fall 2021  18573 004SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Cristina GriffinTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 064
 In this class, we will read (and watch) stories that engage with the long tradition of the gothic: stories that are pleasurably thrilling, that structure themselves around suspense, secrecy, romance, intrigue, and even sometimes fear. We will begin the term by focusing on some of the eighteenth-century texts that established and popularized the gothic conventions that novelists, filmmakers, and television writers still use today. We will then turn to more contemporary reactions to the gothic, investigating how twentieth- and twenty-first-century forms respond to the gothic genre. Our focus as we make our way across the centuries will be on how these stories open up questions about gender. How do gothic texts represent women’s bodies? What is the relationship between gender and violence? How do gendered portrayals of the gothic change over time or embody different political and cultural crises? How do popular contemporary forms—the television show, the dystopian novel—reimagine the gothic? UVA is the ideal place to study gothic literature, since it houses the world’s largest collection of gothic fiction. We will immerse ourselves in this vast treasure trove with an archival project in which you will become an expert on a gothic novel, and contribute your findings to a digital companion to the archive. No library or research experience necessary: we will be working from the ground up as you learn to give these important gothic texts new lives in the twenty-first century.
 The Novel of Upbringing
Fall 2021  19687 007SEM (3 Units)Open 17 / 18James KinneyTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmMaury Hall 110
 TR 12:30PM-01:45PM How does the fictional representation of upbringing reflect on the cultural uses of fiction in general as well as the actual work of becoming adult? Works to be studied: Jane Austen, Emma; Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre; Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; Charles Dickens, Great Expectations; Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn; Michael Malone, Handling Sin. Class requirements: Lively participation including including 8 brief email responses, one short and one longer essay, and a final exam.
 ENGL 2527Shakespeare
 Text and Performance
Fall 2021  18487 001SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Katharine MausMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmShannon House 111
 This seminar is for students who have either taken the first ENWR course or been exempted from it. It is designed to refine writing and literary-interpretive skills for students who already have a grasp of the basics. Over the course of the semester we will read three Shakespeare plays, watch two/three contrasting performances of each one. and write about them. Lots of short ungraded assignments will build to two graded papers, a short one and a long one. Most class meetings will be devoted to discussing the plays and performances, but there will be some direct writing instruction and paper workshopping. Most of the performances will be on film but if, by next fall, live theater is a thing again, we will attend a performance as a class at the American Shakespeare Theatre in Staunton, VA.
 Shakespeare and Desire
Fall 2021  19878 002SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Alexandra KennedyTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 068
 “The sea hath bounds, but deep desire hath none,” remarks Venus to her beloved Adonis in Shakespeare’s eponymous poem. In this course, you will explore Shakespeare’s portrayal of desire in its broadest sense – from the love and lust that Venus cites, to the desire for power, and the problem of desiring something lost. We will read Shakespeare’s verse – including two long poems and a selection of sonnets – and several plays. Guiding questions for our class include: do Shakespeare’s poems speak about desire differently than his plays? How do some subgenres – tragedy, comedy, romance – structure the way that Shakespeare depicts desire? How do issues of age, social station, gender, race, and sexuality inflect discourses of desire across Shakespeare’s works? Shakespeare novices and Shakespeare fans, English majors and non-majors are all welcome. Willingness to close-read Shakespeare’s language (with the aid of a dictionary), to consider interpretative choices in performance, and to engage thoughtfully in discussion are a must. Requirements will include several brief written responses, two longer essays, and lively class participation.
 ENGL 3001History of Literatures in English I
Fall 2021  10436 100Lecture (3 Units)Open 218 / 240Clare KinneyMoWe 12:00pm - 12:50pmMaury Hall 209
 Beowulf to Thomas Jefferson. First years and non majors are warmly welcomed. Click on blue number 10436 for course description.
 The past is another country: they do things differently there. Or do they? Be prepared for the shock of the old—and for its pleasures—as we explore examples of epic and romance, lyric poetry and drama, prose fiction and satire in a course whose range stretches from the Anglo-Saxon heroic poem Beowulf to some variously revolutionary 17th and 18th century works of the imagination. The one sure thing connecting this huge variety of “makings,” these shapings of other people's experiences and beliefs and fantasies, is that someone (somewhere, sometime) felt them important enough to put down in writing and therefore created the possibility for their persistence beyond their own historical moment. Come and meet some heroic survivors! Course requirements: attentive engagement with lectures; regular attendance at/lively participation in discussion sections; two 6 page papers, midterm examination; comprehensive final examination.
 ENGL 3310Eighteenth-Century Women Writers
Fall 2021  18981 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 29 / 30Alison HurleyTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmWilson Hall 214
 During the eighteenth century, social, economic, and technological developments in Britain converged to alter the ways in which texts were produced and consumed. The result of these innovations was a print culture that offered women the opportunity to step onto the public stage as professional authors for the first time. Female authors, nevertheless, remained intensely aware of their “delicate situation” within the literary public sphere. They responded to this situation by deploying a variety of authorial strategies that ingeniously combined self-promotion with self-protection in order to legitimize their appearance in print. This class will be particularly interested in examining the relationship between gender and genre in eighteenth century Britain. Our readings will highlight a series of specific literary forms – letters, drama, poetry, and the novel – each of which implicates gender in distinctive and compelling ways. Class requirements include frequent discussion posts via Collab; two thesis-driven essays; a poetry annotation assignment; and a final exam.
 ENGL 3320English Literature of the Restoration and Early Eighteenth Century
Fall 2021  18433 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 11 / 30Brad PasanekMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmMaury Hall 110
 In this course we survey English literature from 1660 to 1745, by closely and carefully reading five important works. We will focus on major authors and major genres: in particular, Restoration drama, Augustan poetry, early prose fiction, and satire will feature. By the term’s end students will be able to put pressure on formal elements in a text and produce a reading that connects the text to its historical context. — They will also be able to explain terms like 'satire', 'allegory', 'mock epic', 'novel', 'wit', 'Augustan', and 'Restoration'.
 ENGL 3470Major British Authors of the Nineteenth Century
 Austen and Adaptation: Pride and Prejudice and Then Some
Fall 2021  18984 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed 30 / 30Cristina GriffinTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmNew Cabell Hall 364
 When Jane Austen published Pride and Prejudice in 1813, the novel did not even bear her name as its author. In the over two centuries since then, Pride and Prejudice has become a tour de force, spawning countless film adaptations, conferences, festivals, tea cozies, action figures, and even a Mr. Darcy statue in Hyde Park. In this class, we’ll ask how and why this novel seeped into the zeitgeist and never left, changing the face of global literature and bookish culture. To do so, we’ll start by reading Pride and Prejudice with depth and care. Then we’ll take a global genre tour to investigate how the novel has been adapted, co-opted, misread, ignored, commercialized, rewritten, and repurposed. You can expect genre stops to include steamy bodice-rippers, murder mysteries, Muslim romance, television comedies of manners, and yes, some zombies, too. Along the way, we’ll take adaptation seriously as a mode of cultural critique. How do these twentieth- and twenty-first-century genres arise from their own moment of production and how do they reflect back on the nineteenth century? When and how do genres become gendered? How would Mr. Darcy perform on The Bachelor? This class is designed for English and non-English majors. Whether you already sleep with a copy of Pride and Prejudice under your pillow or you’ve been living under a rock and this is the first you’ve ever heard of a lady named Jane Austen, you are welcome here. We’ll tackle Austen’s fiction and legacy rigorously and accessibly, making space for chemists, humanists, and everyone in between. Class assignments will reflect this diversity of approaches. All students should consider themselves forewarned: Pride and Prejudice may become your new favorite novel.
 ENGL 3480The English Novel II
 The Way We Live Now: The Novel in the Nineteenth Century
Fall 2021  18189 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 29 / 30Stephen ArataMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmBryan Hall 235
 “Novels are in the hands of us all,” wrote Anthony Trollope in 1870, “from the Prime Minister down to the last-appointed scullery maid. We have become a novel-reading nation.” Indeed, over the course of the nineteenth century the novel became the most popular—and profitable—literary genre in Great Britain. Its success was due to many factors, none perhaps more important than the extraordinary sophistication and emotional power with which novelists set out to portray (as the title of one of Trollope’s own novels puts it) “the way we live now.” More than ever before, novelists were committed to recording the visible world in all its abundant detail while also exploring the complex interior lives of individual women and men. They accomplished these feats, moreover, by way of gripping stories full of adventure, love (lust too), betrayal, mystery, and wonder. In this course we will immerse ourselves in a half-dozen or so of the finest examples of the genre, chosen from among such writers as Jane Austen, Walter Scott, Charles Dickens, Charlotte Bronte, Elizabeth Gaskell, George Eliot, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Thomas Hardy, and Trollope himself. Requirements will likely include bi-weekly email responses, two essays, a midterm, and final exam.
 ENGL 3510Studies in Medieval Literature
 Dreams and Visions in Medieval Poetry and Art
 wild poems, paintings, architecture: thinking about virtual experience
Fall 2021  19848 001Lecture (3 Units)Permission 27 / 30Elizabeth FowlerTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmMaury Hall 113
 Chaucer, Pearl (by the Gawain poet), Julian of Norwich, illuminations, architecture, gardens: thinking through wild art, the senses, and virtual experience.
 ENGL 3515Medieval European Literature in Translation
 Medieval Mysticism
Fall 2021  18363 001Lecture (3 Units)Open24 / 30 (37 / 40)Professor Kevin HartTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amNew Cabell Hall 389
 This course is also known as Medieval Literature in Translation
 This course introduces students to the flourishing of contemplative (or “mysticial”) writing from the twelfth to the fourteenth centuries. We will converge on The Cloud of Unknowing and Julian of Norwich’s Showings of Divine Love; but we will begin with the amazing treatise The Mystical Ark by Richard of St. Victor, which teaches its readers how to contemplate God in nature. Aquinas disapproved of the treatise, and we’ll find out why when we read his account of it in the Summa theologiæ. Is mysticism a matter of the mind or the heart or both? Is it directed solely to God or can one contemplate anything at all?
 ENGL 3520Studies in Renaissance Literature
 Love and Power in Renaissance Literature
 Read Queen Elizabeth I, Mary Queen of Scots, Shakespeare, Spenser, Donne, Middleton, and Philips.
Fall 2021  18458 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 21 / 22Rebecca RushTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmShannon House 111
 No prior knowledge of Renaissance literature is required or assumed, and majors and non-majors at all levels are welcome.
 In her love poems and political speeches, Queen Elizabeth often returns to the word “care”: what kind of care, she asks, is required of a monarch, and how is it in conflict or in harmony with more personal kinds of “care,” the care one feels for a lover, child, or parent? How does the monarch’s loving self relate to her ruling self? Beginning during Elizabeth’s reign, we will read a range of literary works that reflect on the nature of love, its power to rule over the mind, and its relation to political life. Is love a matter of fortune or choice? Are lovers free or bound? Do lovers care about politics and the good of other people or are their eyes absorbed by their lover? What happens when love is betrayed or the beloved is lost? Readings include Queen Elizabeth’s love poems and speeches, lamentations of betrayed lovers by Isabella Whitney and Thomas Wyatt, the tale of Britomart from Edmund Spenser’s Faerie Queene, William Shakespeare’s dark comedy Much Ado About Nothing, the ecstatic love poems of John Donne and Katherine Philips, Thomas Middleton’s haunting tragedy The Changeling, and a raucous debate between male and female pamphleteers about whether Adam or Eve was more responsible for eating the apple. No prior knowledge of Renaissance literature is required or assumed, and majors and non-majors at all levels are welcome.
 ENGL 3559New Course in English Literature
 Moving On: Migration in/to US
Fall 2021  18603 001Lecture (3 Units)Open23 / 24 (23 / 24)Lisa GoffTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmMaury Hall 113
 STUDENTS JOINING LATE MUST COMPLETE ALL MAKE-UP WORK BY SEPT. 21, AND PLAN TO MISS NO MORE CLASSES. SEE ATTENDANCE, OTHER POLICIES ON SYLLABUS: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1FGUYT2rryWZ71WOLeNL3QDLJEna2zZVCzuwOFfht4As/edit
 This class examines the history of voluntary, coerced, and forced migration in the U.S., tracing the paths of migrating groups and their impact on urban, suburban, and rural landscapes. We’ll dig for cultural clues to changing attitudes about migration over time. Photographs, videos, books, movies, government records, poems, podcasts, paintings, comic strips, museums, manifestos: you name it, we’ll analyze it for this class.
 ENGL 3560Studies in Modern and Contemporary Literature
 Global English
 Global English
Fall 2021  18191 001Lecture (3 Units)Open18 / 30Stephen ArataMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmBryan Hall 235
 The themes of this course are migration, exile, displacement, and (sometimes) return. Our primary readings will consist of twenty-first century anglophone fiction drawn from around the globe. Likely candidates include Helen Oyiyemi, Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche, Teju Cole, Michael Ondaatje, NoViolet Bulawayo, Mohsin Hamid, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Amitav Ghosh, Zadie Smith, Aleksandar Hemon, and Dinaw Mengestu. We will also engage with the lively current debate on the status of world literature as a field of study by way of selected critical pieces by writers such as Amit Chaudhuri, David Damrosch, Emily Apter, and Simon Gikandi. Requirements will include two essays and a handful of shorter writing assignments.
 Musical Fictions
Fall 2021  18371 002Lecture (3 Units)Open21 / 24 (21 / 24)Njelle HamiltonTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 395
 Cross-listed with AAS 3645.
 An exploration of the genre of the contemporary musical novel and why writers and readers are so intrigued by the figure of the musician as a literary trope. Pairing close listening and music theory with close reading of important blues, jazz, reggae, mambo, calypso and rock novels set in the U.S., U.K, Jamaica, Trinidad, France, and Germany, we will consider how novelists attempt to record the soul, lyrics, and structure of music, not on wax, but in novelistic prose, and what kinds of cultural baggage and aesthetic conventions particular music forms bring to the novel form. The topical nature of many of these issues, songs, and novels will hopefully inspire you to thought-provoking class discussions, critical response papers, and final papers that push against the “fictions” and assumptions of musicians and novelists alike.
 Modern English Poetry
Fall 2021  19849 003Lecture (3 Units)Open10 / 30Professor Kevin HartTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmWilson Hall 214
 This seminar introduces students to a range of poetry written in England in the second half of the twentieth century. We will attend to regional differences with regard to subject matter and language, as well as to the different projections of what “England,” “English,” and “Englishness” mean over a period in which England deals with loss of Empire, an increasingly insecure sense of “Britain,” class struggle, immigration, and its ambiguous relationship with Europe. Our main focus will be poems by Basil Bunting, Thom Gunn, Philip Larkin, Geoffrey Hill, Ted Hughes, Philip Larkin, and Sylvia Plath. We will also take notice of what some of these writers say about each other in their letters and essays.
 ENGL 3570Studies in American Literature
 American Wild
 AMERICAN WILD
Fall 2021  18361 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed30 / 30Stephen CushmanMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmMaury Hall 110
 With biblical images of wilderness in mind, seventeenth-century English colonizers of Massachusetts described what they found as another wilderness, howling, savage, terrible. For them it was to be feared, avoided, and, where possible, tamed. Four centuries later, with eighty percent of U.S. citizens living in cities, many of them exposed to wilderness only through calendar pictures or screensaver photos, what meaning or value does American wildness have? Is it only a fantasy image, part of an American brand, as in the phrase “the wild West.” Are wildness and wilderness the same thing? Has the howling, terrible, untamed wildness of the seventeenth-century forest relocated to another sphere, in the wildness of wildfires in California and throughout the west? Is climate the new frontier, the new wilderness, where Americans encounter untamed wildness in droughts, floods, violent storms, and extreme weather? Have we come full circle to more biblical imagery, with apocalypse replacing wilderness as the rubric under which we encounter the wild? This course will begin with a look at biblical antecedents and their influence on white colonists encountering landscapes inhabited by native people. From there we’ll move to the literature of westward exploration, and further encounters with indigenous populations and their lands, in selections from the journals of Jefferson-commissioned Lewis and Clark. Then it’s on to the mid-nineteenth pivot toward wildness in the eyes of Romantic beholders, foremost among them Henry David Thoreau, patron saint of preservation and the environmental movement. Next comes John Muir, whose vision of wilderness begat the U.S. National Park System, admired around the globe and synonymous for many with user-friendly wildness. Proceeding to the twentieth-century, we’ll add important voices, such as Aldo Leopold’s and Rachel Carson’s and Rebecca Solnit’s, as the preservation impulse merges with concern about public health and social justice. We’ll complete our tour in the twenty-first century by joining the intensifying conversation about whether the visions of Thoreau, Muir, et al. are exclusively white and male. Open to all. Those in the Environmental Thought and Practice Program welcome.
 ENGL 3660Modern Poetry
Fall 2021  18482 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed 30 / 30Mark EdmundsonTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmRidley Hall 179
 ENGL 3______In this course we’ll seek to understand and appreciate a group of brilliant modern poets. We begin with William Butler Yeats, a poet who achieved consistent artistic greatness. (But whose ethics and politics provoke some questions.) Then on to Robert Frost, who offers immediate, and very real satisfactions, but who also, on extended study, reveals a deeper, darker side. We’ll read Wallace Stevens next, a stunningly original poet, who looked for paradise in his own imagination. Then we’ll consider T.S. Eliot—author of the culture-shaking poem, “The Waste Land.” With that basis we’ll move out to the singular observer and moralist, Marianne Moore; the independent and high spirited poet of African American life, Langston Hughes; and Elizabeth Bishop, artful poet of loneliness and solitude. Perhaps we’ll end with a contemporary poet or two. Ross Gay? Frederick Seidel? There will be a couple of quizzes, and a paper at the end in which students offer informed appreciation of their favorite writer in the course.
 ENGL 3910Satire
Fall 2021  18430 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 36 / 40John O'BrienTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amMaury Hall 104
 What is satire? Most of us think that we can more or less identify a satire when we see it, but beyond that, defining satire and talking it about meaningfully have often proven elusive. In this course, we will work to figure out not only what satire is, but what it does, socially and politically. We will read satires from the ancient world to the present, from authors like the Roman poet Juvenal, the Irish cleric Jonathan Swift, the Norwegian novelist Gerd Brandenberg, and the American writer Paul Beatty. We will also consider film and video satires, as well as what crops up in the media in the course of the semester—because we know that something will. Midterm and final exams; two writing exercises and occasional contributions on a group e-mail thread or wiki.
 ENGL 3971History of Drama I: Ancient Greece to the Renaissance
Fall 2021  18489 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 15 / 30John ParkerTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmNew Cabell Hall 168
 The first third of this course will cover the drama of classical antiquity in translation, beginning with Greek plays by Sophocles and Euripides, then moving from there to the Latin plays of Plautus and Seneca. The next third of the course will consider the kinds of performance that displaced (and in some cases transformed) this pagan tradition after the Christianization of the Roman empire. We'll likely read a gospel in order to better understand Christianity's relationship to Greco-Roman culture before looking at several dramatizations of scripture, a morality play and perhaps a saint play. The final third of the course will cover plays from the Renaissance, focusing particularly on the commercial London stage. Playwrights will include people like Christopher Marlowe, Thomas Kyd, William Shakespeare, Ben Jonson, and Thomas Middleton. A major goal of the course will be to answer some of the questions posed by historical period: what does it mean, in the context of this particular genre, to move from antiquity to the Middle Ages to the Renaissance? How seriously should we take the differences between paganism and Christianity? What portion of early modern drama derives from classical antiquity, what portion from the Middle Ages, and what portion, if any, is new? What does it mean to say that drama by the time of Shakespeare had been secularized?
 ENGL 4520Seminar in Renaissance Literature
 Renaissance Drama
Fall 2021  18490 001SEM (3 Units)Open10 / 18John ParkerTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 594
 To examine some of Shakespeare's greatest contemporaries and rivals, in particular Christopher Marlowe and Ben Jonson, with special attention to the London theater's sub-genres: revenge tragedy, city comedy and tragi-comedy. Other authors may include Thomas Kyd, Francis Beaumont, John Fletcher, George Chapman, Thomas Middleton, John Webster, John Ford and Philip Massinger. We will try to get a sense of what it means to speak of a "Renaissance" at this moment in English history; how the playtexts were printed and subsequently edited; and how the documents we read relate to early modern stage productions we can only reimagine on this textual basis.
 Afterlives of the Epic
Fall 2021  19751 002SEM (3 Units)Open13 / 15 (13 / 15)James KinneyTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amBryan Hall 233
 TR 09:30AM-10:45AM What becomes of the epic, especially (but not only) in Renaissance England? Where has it been, and where does it still have to go? Why does the most elevated of literary modes in traditional reckonings end up seeming passe or impossible to so many moderns? Works to be read include Homer's epics, The Aeneid, The Inferno, Paradise Lost, Robinson Crusoe, The Dunciad, and The Waste Land. Class requirements: lively participation including brief email responses, two shorter or one more substantial term paper, and a final exam.
 ENGL 4540Seminar in Nineteenth-Century Literature
 Romantic Poetry
 Romantic Poetry
Fall 2021  18986 002SEM (3 Units)Open17 / 18Mark EdmundsonTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmBryan Hall 330
 Romantic Poetry: In this seminar we’ll read closely in the work of the major English Romantic poets: Blake, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, Coleridge, and Byron. We’ll end with a novel by Jane Austen, probably “Pride and Prejudice,” which will give us a useful vantage to evaluate the Romantic project. A short paper and a longer one, plentiful class discussion.
 ENGL 4559New Course in English Literature
 The Bible Part 1: Hebrew Bible / Old Testament
 THE BIBLE: Part 1
Fall 2021  18359 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed15 / 15Stephen CushmanMoWe 11:00am - 12:15pmDawson's Row 1
 The stories, rhythms, and rhetoric of the Bible have been imprinting readers and writers of English since the seventh century. Moving through selections from the Hebrew Bible / Old Testament, from Genesis through the prophets, this course focuses on deepening biblical literacy and sharpening awareness of biblical connections to whatever members of the class are reading in other contexts. Along the way we will discuss English translations of the Bible; the process of canonization; textual history; and the long trail of interpretive approaches, ancient to contemporary. Our text will be the New Oxford Annotated Bible, 5th ed. All are welcome. No previous knowledge of the Bible needed or assumed. PLEASE NOTE: Professor John Parker will teach a course focusing on the New Testament in spring 2022. Both courses will read the New Testament gospel of Mark, connecting the semesters, but you do not have to take the fall course as a prerequisite for the spring one.
 ENGL 4560Seminar in Modern and Contemporary Literature
 Harlem Stories
 Harlem Stories
Fall 2021  18462 003SEM (3 Units)Open 11 / 18Sandhya ShuklaTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amNew Cabell Hall 594
 Harlem has been many things to many people – capital of a global African diaspora, an early instance of Italian and Jewish immigrant communities, home to an important el barrio, a representative site of contemporary gentrification and, above all, a place for racial and ethnic minoritization. This course will explore many of those lived and symbolic Harlems from the early twentieth century to the present. It will closely consider representations that both open up a paradigmatic case of race and class in the United States and dwell in the possibilities of cross-cultural exchange across regional divides. We will employ the language and structure of globality to understand the heterogeneity of blackness – African/American, Caribbean, Puerto Rican and more – and variegations of whiteness, in a range of novels, films, memoirs and essays that interrogate identity and community. The mix of approaches across fields will build an interdisciplinary inquiry into the production of social space and suggest that forms – narrative structures and modes, styles of description – are crucial for understanding the power of this place. Key texts may include fictional and non-fictional works such as Chester Himes’s A Rage in Harlem, Nella Larsen’s Quicksand and Passing, Claude McKay’s Home to Harlem, Toni Morrison’s Jazz, Ernesto Quinones’s Bodega Dreams, Sharifa Rhodes-Pitt’s Harlem is Nowhere, Langston Hughes’s Montage of a Dream Deferred, Monique Taylor’s Harlem Between Heaven and Hell, and Piri Thomas’s Down These Mean Streets, as well as cultural historical and theoretical materials by George Hutchinson, Robert Orsi, Wilson Harris, Edouard Glissant and Marshall Berman. Students will be required to present on one week’s materials for class, submit regular reading responses and complete one critical essay and a longer research paper on a chosen topic.
 Music of the Black Atlantic
Fall 2021  20335 004SEM (3 Units)Open 8 / 18 (8 / 18)Njelle HamiltonTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmDell 1 104
 Listen: some of us haven’t left our houses/town/state in a year and we can’t safely go on cruises right now. So come vibe to a carnival of music as we travel the major ports of call from which key Black music forms emerged: New Orleans (jazz and blues); Kingston (reggae and dub); Rio de Janeiro (samba and bossa nova); Lagos (highlife and afrobeat); London/Brixton (lovers rock and grime). Our in-class activities will be a combination of dedicated listening sessions (DJ-NJ at the Spotify turntable); reading about music; and analyzing musical novels, plays, TV shows and films and their soundtracks. We’ll have spirited discussions on Deck 5 about George Wolfe’s jazz-origins play Jelly’s Last Jam, Marcia Douglas’s reggae novel The Marvellous Equations of the Dread, Netflix’s bossa nova romper Girls from Ipanema, Broadway’s booty-shaking Fela!, Steve McQueen’s slow burning Lovers Rock, and ride Kodwo Eshun’s mind-bending sonic spaceship to the Afrofuture. By the time our imaginary cruise ship returns to port at the end of the semester, you will be well equipped to craft a research paper that applies black sound studies approaches and methods to whatever ports, sounds or texts fired your imagination and curiosity. See you aboard!
 ENGL 4561Seminar in Modern Literature and Culture
 Coetzee and Rushdie
Fall 2021  18427 001SEM (3 Units)Open 6 / 18Christopher KrentzMoWeFr 12:00pm - 12:50pmBryan Hall 235
 In this course we’ll explore the work of two of the most well-known postcolonial novelists working in English: J.M. Coetzee (originally from S. Africa) and Salman Rushdie (originally from India). In some ways they are a study in contrasts: while Coetzee has produced spare fiction whose sentences the Nobel Prize committee in 2003 praised for being “pregnant with meaning,” Rushdie’s books are verbose, playful, and funny, whizzing among many rhetorical modes. Yet in many ways they pair up well: both first achieved prominence in the 1980s; both masterfully use language to critique their historical moments and the authoritarian regimes around them; both protest censorship, with Rushdie famously having to go into hiding to avoid a fatwa, or death sentence by Iran's supreme ruler, in 1988; and both have chosen to live away from the nations of their birth. We’ll probably read Coetzee’s novels Waiting for the Barbarians, Life & Times of Michael K, Disgrace, and Summertime, and Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children, East, West, The Moor’s Last Sigh, as well as excerpts from his other work. You should expect some great reading, enlivening discussions, new insight into other parts of the world, and some literary-critical writing assignments that give you the chance to do some research.
 ENGL 4580Seminar in Literary Criticism
 Reason, Criticism, Culture
Fall 2021  19686 001SEM (3 Units)Permission6 / 16Walter JostTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 209
 In the past this course has attracted independent, self-motivating students looking for something challenging and different. Great for aspiring law students.
 ENGL 4580, Reason, Criticism, Culture (3 credits). Pre-law? Headed to grad school in the humanities or social sciences? Determined to develop your ability to think critically and holistically? This course offers an advanced introduction to critical, and specifically to “rhetorical thinking” across several fields—primarily to interpretation in law, literature, and social science. The orientation of our readings and class discussions is more analytical than historical, focusing on the “how” of rhetorical reasoning and action rather than (though not excluding) names and dates of historical figures and events. This orientation makes it a particularly helpful course for students thinking about law school or interdisciplinary study in humanities and social sciences. We study rhetoric to get our bearings with respect to reading literature; we spend several weeks on reasoning in legal “hard” cases; and we conclude with a study of interpretation in disciplines like anthropology and economics. Class sessions and assignments use many concrete examples (ranging from daily life, newspapers, television and film, to political speeches, law cases, and poems) and especially the contexts in which they occur. Mid-term and final; one paper; one paper/class presentation (meets second writing requirement). Main Texts TBD.
 ENGL 5559New Course in English Literature
 Reinventing Shakespeare
 Reinventing Shakespeare across various genres and media
Fall 2021  18483 002SEM (3 Units)Closed18 / 18Clare KinneyMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmDell 1 104
 Click on blue number 18483 for course description!
 Shakespeare’s works have been regularly appropriated by both literary critics and creative artists to serve very different cultural agendas at various historical moments. In this course we will take a close look at four plays and their afterlife, in each case exploring the resonance of their reshaping and revision in a variety of media (while also paying some attention to the critical reception of the works and to contemporary scholarship on Shakespearian adaptation). Why is Shakespeare such a malleable cultural icon? What do these creative re-productions suggest about the cultural forces underlying the apparently unceasing need to remake and/or “correct” and/or supplement “Shakespeare’s genius”? Tentative list of plays whose metamorphoses we will explore: A Midsummer Night’s Dream; Hamlet; King Lear; The Tempest. Course requirements: lively participation in discussion, an oral presentation, one short research exercise, one long term paper, a portfolio of e-mail responses.
 Theories of Rhetoric & Affect
Fall 2021  18989 003SEM (3 Units)Open12 / 18T. Kenny FountainTh 3:30pm - 6:00pmNew Cabell Hall 594
 What part does language and representation play in our construction and experience of emotion? This course will engage that question by exploring the intersection of rhetorical studies, literary studies, and affect studies. Specifically, we will examine how emotion, sensation, and affect have been conceptualized, condemned, and celebrated—from Plato to contemporary neuroscience. Rather than answer this animating question once and for all, we will read primary and secondary works across a vast historical period to better understand the often-connected ways thinkers have wrestled with the question and its philosophical and practical implications. We will begin with ancient Greek and Roman debates about the dangerous power of rhetoric and poetry to stir emotions by engaging one’s imagination and memory. Next, we will turn to a host of medieval and early modern works (from philosophical and literary treatises to ars rhetorica and ars poetriae) that build from this ancient tradition as a means of taking seriously emotion and passion as sources for both art and ethics. Finally, we will end in the 20th and 21st centuries, where scholars of rhetoric, literature, and digital media argue with and against the work of philosophers and scientists—each seeking to explain the role emotion and affect play in the formation of self, the work of politics, and the experience of contemporary life. Course requirements will include class participation, short reading-based responses, a longer paper, and an op-ed designed for a public audience. Important Note on the Course: For decades, scholars from within rhetorical studies have critiqued the field for its narrow focus on white, European rhetorical traditions, a focus that frequently excludes or marginalizes the perspectives of non-white, non-male, non-US, and non-western scholars and theorists (Godfried Agyeman Asante, “#RhetoricSoWhite and US Centered,” 2019). This course takes seriously that critique and responds by expanding what we think of as "the" rhetorical tradition and including work on rhetoric, affect, and emotion by scholars from backgrounds and perspectives often overlooked by dominant approaches to rhetoric.
 ENGL 5830Introduction to World Religions, World Literatures
 Prayer and material culture across the English Reformation (this course meets with ENGL 8110)
Fall 2021  19865 001SEM (3 Units)Permission15 / 15 (15 / 15)Elizabeth FowlerTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmBrooks Hall 103
 This course meets with ENGL 8110, but students enrolled in it will have slightly different (and slightly fewer) assignments, in line with its role in introducing cross-disciplinary work in religion and literature. The course will focus on devotional practices and their instruments and supports: texts, objects, body techniques. The English Reformation provides a fascinating laboratory in which we can see a rapid transformation of devotional culture and see how it matters whether, for instance, a prayer or a poem concerns an altar or a table. Research and writing about the relation between words and other instruments (beads and badges, books, relics, candles, icons, furniture, architecture, and so forth). WRWL students: either 5830 or 8110 can count towards your requirement; choose according to your interests.
 ENGL 5831Proseminar in World Religions, World Literature
Fall 2021  19866 001SEM (1 Units)Open12 / 15Elizabeth FowlerFr 2:00pm - 3:00pmBryan Hall 312
 1-credit virtual workshop open to grads at all levels in all depts. Write fowler@virginia.edu for zoom link and more info.
 This one-credit, pass/fail seminar meets most weeks for an hour (probably Fridays at 2) and brings together students from many departments and disciplines who are interested in the intersections between religions and literatures in their work. All are welcome, MAs and PhDs; our syllabus is student-driven and often invites guests from around the university, offers a place to present work (following our rule of fewer than 10 pages of reading a session), and is ongoing from semester to semester, giving a home to scholars who prize comparatism, lack of boundaries, and warm collegiality. Judaism, Islam, Christianity, Buddhism, French, Spanish, Arabic, English, more--it’s all in our purview. Meets together with RELG 5821, its Religious Studies counterpart. Write Elizabeth Fowler for more information: fowler@virginia.edu.
 ENGL 8110Medieval Transitions to the Renaissance
 The Art of Prayer: Lyric Theory and the Senses
Fall 2021  18364 001Lecture (3 Units)Permission15 / 15 (15 / 15)Elizabeth FowlerTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmBrooks Hall 103
 An investigation into the relation of lyric texts and material culture. Meets with ENGL 5830, but has somewhat different research and writing projects. The goal is to develop your facility with poems, poetics and lyric theory, with research into your choice among things like books, painting, icons, reliquaries, statues, tombs, furniture, landscape, or architecture, and with thought about language and objects over historical time. The sequence of exercises, pursued independently and collaboratively, is designed to help you draft an essay aimed at publication. We start with medieval books of hours, psalters, and prayers by the likes of William Herebert, John Lydgate, and the ubiquitous and probably female Anonymous. Then we enter the Reformation with the Book of Common Prayer and prayers by Mary Sidney, Edmund Spenser, John Donne, George Herbert, Richard Crashaw, and more. Concepts of linguistic temporality, habitus, speech act theory, syncretism, ductus, spatiality, presence, virtuality, and the history of the senses and emotions will be part of our toolbox. No need to know Latin or Middle English beforehand, but I hope you'll be open to acquiring a little.
 ENGL 8400The Romantic Period
 Romanticism by the Book
Fall 2021  20336 001SEM (3 Units)Open16 / 18Andrew StaufferTh 2:00pm - 4:30pmNew Cabell Hall 183
 A survey of British Romanticism via book history, accomplished by taking about a dozen individual influential historical books in hand, including Songs of Innocence and of Experience by Blake, Lyrical Ballads by Wordsworth and Coleridge, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Keats's Lamia volume, and Byron's Childe Harold's Pilgrimage. We will track the publication and reception history of each one in detail, using the bibliographic and critical heritage of the works to construct a working narrative of Romanticism's cultural and theoretical influence from the 19th century to the present. We will be interested in the relation of material format to literary content, and in the double helix of publication and reception that constitutes Romanticism as our legacy. Grades will be based on participation, an in-depth presentation, and a seminar paper.
 ENGL 8500Studies in English Literature
 Oceanic Connections
 Black Atlantic and Indian Ocean Histories
Website  18431 001SEM (3 Units)Open11 / 12Debjani GangulyTu 3:30pm - 6:00pmNew Cabell Hall 594
 The course will explore the emergence of the ‘oceanic’ as a powerful paradigm in global and hemispheric literary studies. The fluidity of the ocean as against terrestrial borders gives new meaning to categories like empire, diaspora, postcolonial, slave, settler and indentured labor. Through novels, philosophical tracts and theories of history, we will study the import of the transatlantic slave trade and its traumatic entanglement with global histories of modern maritime colonialism including those of Indian Ocean worlds. Specifically, we will trace connections across the Black Atlantic and Indian Ocean worlds through the novels of Barry Unsworth, Fred D’Aguiar and Amitav Ghosh, and the narrative non-fiction of Paul Gilroy. The course will include excerpts from the work of Edouard Glissant, the famous exponent of Caribbean Creolite, from an anthology of black narratives that emerged during the transatlantic slave trade, and from Ian Baucom’s philosophical history of the Zong massacre of 1781.
 ENGL 8520Studies in Renaissance Literature
 Afterlives of the Epic
Fall 2021  19752 001SEM (3 Units)Open13 / 15 (13 / 15)James KinneyTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amBryan Hall 233
 TR 09:30AM-10:45AM What becomes of the epic, especially (but not only) in Renaissance England? Where has it been, and where does it still have to go? Why does the most elevated of literary modes in traditional reckonings end up seeming passe or impossible to so many moderns? Works to be read include Homer's epics, The Aeneid, The Inferno, Paradise Lost, Robinson Crusoe, The Dunciad, and The Waste Land. Class requirements: lively participation including brief email responses, two shorter or one more substantial term paper, and a final exam.
 ENGL 8596Form and Theory of Poetry
 Thomas Jefferson for Poets
 Thomas Jefferson for Poets
Fall 2021  12083 001SEM (3 Units)Permission13 / 14Kiki PetrosinoWe 2:00pm - 4:30pmNew Cabell Hall 044
 This is a course designed for MFA students. If room permits, MA and PhD students may apply for instructor permission. Before seeking permission on SIS, contact Prof. Kiki Petrosino (cmp2k@virginia.edu) for more information.
 The memory of Thomas Jefferson is everywhere in Charlottesville. His house. His words. His image. His University. What does it mean to live and write here, in the “Academical Village” he designed for the sons of wealthy planters? In this seminar, we’ll contemplate Thomas Jefferson as an occasion to study how we, as artists, connect place, space, and imagination. If the creative process, by definition, invites poets to forge new pathways of language, then what happens when we gather in a centuries-old place suffused with the spirit—and contradictions—of one Founding Father? Our approach to these questions will be multi-layered. Together we’ll explore contemporary works that contemplate aspects of Jefferson’s legacy, with attention to the contributions of women, indigenous peoples, and African Americans. We’ll begin by examining Jefferson’s own writings alongside contemporary historical analyses and commentary. We’ll also read craft texts and theory on documentary poetics, the practice of combining research and poetic composition. Coursework, including group learning experiences (one self-guided), will give students the opportunity to produce a research-based poetic text engaging themes inspired by the course material. Though this is a readings-based course, students should be prepared and willing to participate in writing exercises, to exchange works-in-progress, and to offer constructive critique.
 ENGL 8820Critical Methods
 How Should a Critic Be
Fall 2021  18488 001Discussion (3 Units)Closed16 / 15Emily OgdenMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmMemorial Gymnasium 211
 How should a critic be? This course approaches the question of critical method in terms of ethos rather than in terms of technique. Our focus in considering the history of critical method from the twentieth century to the present will be on ethos, the characteristic spirit that governs practice and self-understanding for practitioners in a certain period or within a certain school of thought. Following historians of science Lorraine Daston and Peter Galison, the course assumes that we can learn a great deal about scholarly practice by looking at the various “regulative ideals” to which critics hold themselves. A focus on ethos directs us toward considering criticism as having intrinsic value for the communities that practice it (rather than instrumental value for “society” or “democracy”). It also can serve as an invitation to us to ask how we want to be, as critics, in the present and future. This course surveys critical methods from the twentieth century to the present, with a special though not exclusive focus on practitioners who identify themselves as “critics” and who are trained or work in English departments. It is not a practicum course; that is, you shouldn’t expect to emerge with a set of tips about how to produce critical writing. Instead, we could call it an interested history: we will consider the open question of how we should practice and who, as critics, we might decide we should be, in relation to the way fellow critics have answered these questions. We will likely read such critics as: T. S. Eliot, I. A. Richards, William K. Wimsatt, Zora Neale Hurston, Lionel Trilling, Hortense Spillers, D. A. Miller, Fredric Jameson, Stanley Cavell, Robert Reid-Pharr, Saidiya Hartman, Christina Sharpe, Merve Emre, Rachel Buurma, Laura Heffernan, and Toril Moi. Course members should expect a significant reading load and near-weekly short writing assignments.
Engineering
 ENGR 1501Special Topics
 SURE: How to Perform Research
Syllabus  20143 002Lecture (1 Units)Open18 / 30Brian HelmkeWe 5:00pm - 5:50pmRice Hall 032
 How can we fix a Mars rover when it’s having operational difficulties? How can we use biomaterials to genetically engineer stem cells? What kinds of tools are needed to see the subatomic structure of a material? Research questions are answerable questions that require a specific skill set to answer. In this course, we will gain the tools and resources necessary for becoming involved in research labs at UVA by thinking critically about how to ask and answer questions. We will also utilize lab tours and guest lecturers spanning across the engineering disciplines in SEAS to learn more about academic research.
Writing and Rhetoric
 ENWR 1510Writing and Critical Inquiry
 Writing as Multilingual Writers
Fall 2021  12823 003SEM (3 Units)Open 14 / 18Derek CavensTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmBryan Hall 310
 This course is intended for, but not limited to, students for whom English is not their first language.
 Writing as Multilingual Writers
Fall 2021  12529 016SEM (3 Units)Open 15 / 18Derek CavensTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amBryan Hall 310
 This course is intended for, but not limited to, students for whom English is not their first language.
 Writing about Culture/Society
 The Almighty Dollar: Writing about Money, Mobility & the American Dream
Fall 2021  10892 025SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Jessica WalkerTuTh 8:00am - 9:15amBryan Hall 330
 In this section of ENWR-1510, we will be writing about money, mobility and the American Dream. This is not a finance or economics course. You need no knowledge of supply and demand, commodities, derivatives or interest rates. Instead, you will be expected to examine and analyze the way money intersects with society, culture and the human condition. Each week we will engage with writing and materials that reflect how money influences the world we live in. You will be expected to generate responses to the assigned topics, engage in discourse with your peers, then use this process to better your writing. We will collectively take up questions such as--What is the role of money in American culture? Does material wealth make us happier? Is financial gain a necessary part of the American Dream? What does it mean to be a sell out? What happens when creativity and money collide? What do popular narratives--such as the films The Wolf of Wall Street, Wall Street and The Pursuit of Happyness--say about the culture of making money in America? About wealth, inequity and upward mobility? What financial and monetary trends can we identify as unique to Gen Z? How do social media trends--such as influencers and flexing--reflect attitudes about money in contemporary culture? We will examine money’s moral, cultural and social complexity in order to better understand the power of the Almighty Dollar.
 Writing about the Arts
 Writing about Film
Fall 2021  10901 034SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Marissa KessenichMoWeFr 1:00pm - 1:50pmBryan Hall 334
 “Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn.” “May the Force be with you.” “Why so serious?” Whether it’s a movie you came across on Netflix, an old favorite, or a new release at the theater, film is a source of entertainment, identity, and knowledge. The range of genres and tastes—from comedy or drama, body horror or psychological thrillers, science fiction or fantasy, live-action or animation—means there is something for everyone to enjoy. Film helps us mark time and provides a frame of reference for talking about culture in the 20th and 21st centuries. In this course, we will be writing about film and its influence on our everyday lives. We will watch several movies and read articles that critique and analyze film using different approaches. You will be asked to respond to these readings as well as write papers that demonstrate your own film analyses. This class asks students to think critically about film, considering questions like: How do movies shape our lives and influence our perception of the world and our place in it? How do our own experiences and identities inform our taste? What makes “good” film, and who gets to say so? Why does the film industry continue to be so influential? This class does not require extensive movie knowledge.
 Writing about the Arts
 Adaptation: From Short Story to Feature-Length Film
Fall 2021  11035 042SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Nathan FrankMoWeFr 1:00pm - 1:50pmShannon House 111
 This section of ENWR 1510 examines challenges faced by those who attempt to convert a written text into a film — or, what’s commonly called film adaptation. The written texts selected for this section of ENWR 1510 are (mostly) short fictional stories by modern and contemporary writers, and the films are (mostly) feature-length productions based on these stories (I put "mostly" in parentheses because we will complicate things in fun and experimental ways, too - meaning that we need to deviate occasionally from general trends). Using adaptation as a topic is a way for us to write about a form of rewriting (on the totally open-to-debate premise that adaptation is indeed a form of rewriting), and in turn, for us to think and write about what critical inquiry and rewriting have to do with each other.
 Writing about Culture/Society
 Media and Remediation
Fall 2021  12272 047SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Evan CheneyMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 338
 With the widespread increase in the availability and necessity of new technologies and multimedia tools, more and more writing appears alongside “non-written” means of representing experience, generating knowledge, and communicating ideas. Yet, as notable media theorist Marshall McLuhan once observed, “the ‘content’ of any medium is always another medium” (Understanding Media, 23-24). Newer digital media, it seems, are always “remediating”—that is, borrowing, repurposing, and re-presenting—older forms of media including speech and writing. Thus, “Remediating Media” asks you to think about not merely the content of writing, but its very form as well. Yet, as new forms of media proliferate, they often try to erase or obscure these affiliations. Our job will be to use our discussions to peel back the curtain on the process of remediation, allowing us to pay attention not only to what is “written” (i.e. the content) but also the form or mode of that content, (i.e. how it is composed and presented). We will not merely study new technologies allowing multimodal composition, but also consider how those technologies (re)fashion culture itself.
 Writing about Culture/Society
 The Almighty Dollar: Writing about Money, Mobility & the American Dream
Fall 2021  12408 057SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Jessica WalkerTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amBryan Hall 332
 In this section of ENWR-1510, we will be writing about money, mobility and the American Dream. This is not a finance or economics course. You need no knowledge of supply and demand, commodities, derivatives or interest rates. Instead, you will be expected to examine and analyze the way money intersects with society, culture and the human condition. Each week we will engage with writing and materials that reflect how money influences the world we live in. You will be expected to generate responses to the assigned topics, engage in discourse with your peers, then use this process to better your writing. We will collectively take up questions such as--What is the role of money in American culture? Does material wealth make us happier? Is financial gain a necessary part of the American Dream? What does it mean to be a sell out? What happens when creativity and money collide? What do popular narratives--such as the films The Wolf of Wall Street, Wall Street and The Pursuit of Happyness--say about the culture of making money in America? About wealth, inequity and upward mobility? What financial and monetary trends can we identify as unique to Gen Z? How do social media trends--such as influencers and flexing--reflect attitudes about money in contemporary culture? We will examine money’s moral, cultural and social complexity in order to better understand the power of the Almighty Dollar.
 Writing about Culture/Society
 The Almighty Dollar: Writing about Money, Mobility & the American Dream
Fall 2021  12412 062SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Jessica WalkerTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmBryan Hall 334
 In this section of ENWR-1510, we will be writing about money, mobility and the American Dream. This is not a finance or economics course. You need no knowledge of supply and demand, commodities, derivatives or interest rates. Instead, you will be expected to examine and analyze the way money intersects with society, culture and the human condition. Each week we will engage with writing and materials that reflect how money influences the world we live in. You will be expected to generate responses to the assigned topics, engage in discourse with your peers, then use this process to better your writing. We will collectively take up questions such as--What is the role of money in American culture? Does material wealth make us happier? Is financial gain a necessary part of the American Dream? What does it mean to be a sell out? What happens when creativity and money collide? What do popular narratives--such as the films The Wolf of Wall Street, Wall Street and The Pursuit of Happyness--say about the culture of making money in America? About wealth, inequity and upward mobility? What financial and monetary trends can we identify as unique to Gen Z? How do social media trends--such as influencers and flexing--reflect attitudes about money in contemporary culture? We will examine money’s moral, cultural and social complexity in order to better understand the power of the Almighty Dollar.
 Writing about Identities
 Experiments in Learning
Fall 2021  13522 068SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Stephanie CerasoTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmBryan Hall 312
 How do humans learn? When and where does learning occur? Why are we better at learning some things than others? Is it possible to learn how to learn? What does it mean to really learn something? This seminar will serve as a collective inquiry into the experience of learning. We will be reading and writing about a range of topics related to learning, such as curiosity, motivation, failure, boredom, attention and distraction, uncertainty, and more. In addition, our own histories of and investments in learning will serve as key course texts. Rather than talking about learning in an abstract way, you will spend a lot of time examining your own formal and informal learning experiences. Play and experimentation are also core principles of this class. Alongside more traditional writing assignments, you will get to create a mini video documentary about learning something new and participate in various “learning experiments” throughout the semester.
 ENWR 2520Special Topics in Writing
 Vegan Writing
Fall 2021  13399 003SEM (3 Units)Closed 16 / 16Lindgren JohnsonTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmChemistry Bldg 306
 What does it mean to read and write vegan? This class will explore the emerging and diverse field of vegan theory in order to consider how we can apprehend, imagine, and engage with diversity within and without our species nonviolently. How can we recognize the vulnerability of others and respond ethically to that vulnerability through and in our writing? At the same time, how can we respond ethically to the agency of others, engaging with nonhuman rhetorics?
 ENWR 3640Writing with Sound
Fall 2021  14169 001WKS (3 Units)Closed 16 / 16Stephanie CerasoTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmBryan Hall 328
 This project-based course explores podcasting as a dynamic form of 21st century storytelling. Students will learn to script, design, edit, and produce a range of compelling audio compositions. In addition to reading about and practicing professional audio storytelling techniques (e.g. interviewing, writing for the ear, sound and music design), students will develop several original projects. No experience with digital audio editing is necessary. Beginners welcome!
French
 FREN 3030Phonetics
Fall 2021  11776 001Lecture (3 Units)Open14 / 18Gladys SaundersTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amNew Cabell Hall 283
  FREN 3030 is an introductory course in French phonetics. It provides basic concepts in articulatory phonetics and phonological theory, and offers students techniques for improving their own pronunciation. The course will cover the physical characteristics of individual French sounds; the relationship between these sounds and their written representation (orthography); the rules governing the pronunciation of "standard French"; the most salient phonological features of selected French varieties; phonetic differences between French and English sounds; and to some extent, ‘la musique du français’, i.e., prosodic phenomena (le rythme, l’accent, l’intonation, la syllabation). Practical exercises in 'ear-training' (the perception of sounds) and 'phonetic transcription' (using IPA) are also essential components of this dynamic course. Pre-requisite: FREN 2020 (or equivalent). Course taught in French; counts for major/minor credit in French and Linguistics TR 9:30 am – 10:45 am (Saunders)
 FREN 3031Finding Your Voice in French
Fall 2021  10496 004SEM (3 Units)Closed 15 / 15Cheryl KruegerMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 291
 COURSE OBJECTIVES to help you find your "voice" in written French to help you discover what you enjoy about writing in French to experiment with writing genres and styles, from creative writing to film reviews, to essays to think about how form and meaning work together, and how form can change, alter, skew, reinforce, refine the expression of ideas to practice editing and rewriting your own work to read the work of fellow students to benefit their writing and your own to learn to use print and online resources to refine grammar and style to hone writing skills that will serve you in other courses (including courses taught in English) to learn to review and revise grammar independently to write with a sense of the reader in mind to read a variety of short texts (on topics selected by the students) with content, grammar, style, and register in mind What you will do: review basic French grammar and go into further depth on more advanced grammar; much of this will be done at home practice grammar with written exercises and an answer key (at home) integrate better grammar in writing develop a personal system for tracking the grammar you need to work on work in teams to compose drafts and to peer-review prepare to apply what you have learned to more advanced courses. share ideas and information in class and on a discussion board read short texts/listen and view video in class and at home discuss readings assigned by the teacher and by fellow students assign and lead the discussion of a reading from the internet
 FREN 3034Advanced Oral Expression in French
Fall 2021  19012 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 16 / 18Gladys SaundersTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmNew Cabell Hall 115
 This course will allow students to learn and reflect on issues that are of concern to their French-speaking contemporaries. It offers an excellent opportunity for students to practice their French speaking skills in a variety of communicative contexts. Class resources will include French online newspapers, magazines, radio, and television. Discussion topics will be determined largely by student interests, but likely topics will include education, family life, the arts, immigration, Franco-American relations, sports and business culture. Students will be graded on their engaged involvement in class discussions, their in-class presentations (individual and group), a final oral reflective exam and an audio and/or video class project or contribution to a class web-journal. FREN 3034 is the only course on offer to emphasize, exclusively, the skill of speaking French (spontaneously and fluently) Pre-requisite: FREN 3031 and either completion of FREN 3032 or concurrent enrollment in FREN 3032. This course is not intended for students who are native speakers of French or whose secondary education was in French schools. TR 12:30 pm – 1:45 pm (Saunders)
 FREN 3043The French-Speaking World III: Modernities
 Great Books
Fall 2021  12735 001SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Ari BlattTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amClemons Library 320
 Rather than focus on any single theme, movement, motif, or overarching problematic, this seminar will examine a few of the most admired and influential novels in the history of modern French literature. Special attention will be paid to the potential uses (and to the ultimate uselessness) of literature. How might reading fiction (and learning how to read it well) inform our understanding of the world and our place in it? Texts may include, but are certainly not limited to: Balzac’s tale of a young law student’s drive to make it in the big city in Le Père Goriot; Flaubert’s portrait of the original desperate housewife in Madame Bovary; Robbe-Grillet’s scandalously puzzling La jalousie ; Georges Perec's critique of consumer society in the 1960s (Les Choses); and Maylis de Kerangal's mesmerizing, polyphonic novel about love, loss, and our beating hearts (Réparer les vivants). We might also end our semester with an "extremely contemporary" novel published during the last year or two. Required work may include: active participation in class discussion, weekly ruminations on the readings posted to a forum on Collab, an oral presentation, and two analytical essays. Course conducted entirely in French. Prerequisite: FREN 3032.
 FREN 4560Advanced Topics in Nineteenth-Century Literature
 19th-century French Romanticism.
Fall 2021  17713 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed19 / 18Claire LyuMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 207
 Ce cours vous invite à explorer la triple quête – du moi, du bonheur, et de l’amour – dans laquelle s’engage la jeunesse romantique française de la première moitié du 19ème siècle où de nombreux facteurs culturels, sociaux, historiques, et politiques (y compris la tombée de Napoléon Ier) concourent à façonner une esthétique littéraire à la fois complexe et contradictoire. A travers une lecture approfondie de poèmes, nouvelle, roman, traité/ manifeste, nous examinerons la sensibilité, la passion, et la révolte qui animent les héros et les héroïnes romantiques pour interroger comment ils conçoivent le moi, vivent l’amour, et poursuivent le bonheur. Nous nous intéresserons à la manière dont le genre et la différence sexuelle se construisent dans l’univers romantique ainsi qu’à la manière dont le romantisme se libère du classicisme et prépare la modernité. Tout au long du semestre, nous essayerons de dégager la pertinence de la pensée et de l’expérience romantiques du passé pour notre époque contemporaine qui est tout aussi préoccupée par le moi (ou son image), le bonheur (ou le succès), et bien sûr, l’amour. Cours requis : Un cours sur la littérature, la culture, ou le cinéma français au-delà de FREN 3032 (ou l’accord de la professeure).
 FREN 4585Advanced Topics in Cultural Studies
 Love and Sex in the French Renaissance
 Love, Sex, Marriage, and Friendship in Renaissance France
Fall 2021  17714 002Lecture (3 Units)Open13 / 18Gary FergusonTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 211
 If passions and emotions are part of human nature, the forms they take and the ways in which they are and can be expressed vary greatly over time and between cultures. How were love, sex, marriage, and friendship understood and lived in sixteenth-century France – in each case between members of the opposite sex and the same sex? How did they evolve in this pivotal period of transition between the Middle Ages and the modern world? How were they inflected by intellectual, social and cultural movements such as the Reformation, Humanism, developing notions of the individual, and ongoing debates about the nature of women? Through the study of a combination of contemporary texts and modern films, we will explore a fascinating culture, at once similar to and different from our own – one whose stories (like that of Romeo and Juliet) still speak to us today and with whose legacy we live and continue to grapple.
 FREN 4744The Occupation and After
Fall 2021  17715 001SEM (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Ari BlattTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmClemons Library 320
 While in 2014 the French spent a year commemorating the centenary of the start of the “Great War” (“la Der des Ders,” the so called “war to end all wars”), in the summer of 2015 the nation marked another important anniversary: namely, seventy years since the Liberation of Paris during World War II. The German occupation of France, which lasted from 1940 until 1945, was one of the most consequential periods in the nation’s history, one that left an indelible mark on the French national psyche that continues to rouse the country’s collective memory to this day. After an initial examination of the political and social conditions in France under the Nazi regime, this seminar proposes to explore the enduring legacy of those “Dark Years” by investigating how the complex (and traumatic) history of the Occupation has impacted French culture during the last half of the twentieth century and into the first decades of the twenty first. Discussions will focus on a variety of documentary and artistic sources—novels and films, mostly, though we will also explore photography and the graphic novel—that attest to what historians refer to as contemporary France’s collective “obsession” with the past. Readings and films may include (but are not limited to) work by Némirovsky, Vercors, Perec, Duras, Modiano, Salvayre, Daeninckx, Claudel, Sartre, Clouzot, Melville, Resnais, Ophüls, Berri, Malle, Chabrol, and Audiard. Course conducted in French. Prerequisite: At least one 3000-level FREN course above 3032.
 FREN 4838French Society and Civilization
 La France contemporaine
Fall 2021  17716 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed 18 / 18Janet HorneTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmClemons Library 320
 Developing cultural literacy is an integral part of becoming an educated citizen of the world. The attainment of cultural literacy includes understanding social norms as well as politics and current events in a particular country. In France, cultural literacy is particularly valued in professional life, where the expectation is that you will be able to converse on a wide range of topics outside your field of specialization. This course is designed to provide you with some tools for developing cultural literacy in the French context. During the leadup to the French presidential elections in spring 2022, this course will take a deep dive into the politics, culture, and society of present-day France. You should come away from this class with a deeper understanding of social norms and institutional structures, as well as the ability to follow and understand French media coverage of events as they unfold in France. In your future travels in the US or abroad, you should feel comfortable discussing and debating social, political, and cultural issues and current events relating to France. To achieve those goals, we will study the evolution of French society, politics, and culture from the end of the Second World War until the present. We will study major social problems facing contemporary France: the role of women, education, immigration, race, religion, public health as well as France's status in the European Union. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on readings from the French press, the televised news, and other visual sources.
 FREN 5510Topics in Medieval Literature
 Race/Gender/Class & the Premodern
Fall 2021  13210 001SEM (3 Units)Open8 / 18 (8 / 18)Deborah McGradyTh 3:30pm - 6:00pmContact Department
 This course will challenge the contemporary perception that premodern Europe was an all-white privileged masculine space by turning to creative works of the late medieval francophone world in which racialized, gendered and classed bodies take shape. This course will draw on exile and war poetry, popular theatre, romances of conquest, history writing and travel literature to investigate the role of power and privilege in the formation of premodern identity, the politics of othering, and the question of subaltern agency in late medieval society. Contemporary critical identity studies will be used to deepen our understanding of medieval culture at the same time that our medieval material will be mined for the new insights it brings to this criticism. Course taught in English, reading knowledge of modern French strongly recommended.
 FREN 5560Topics in Nineteenth-Century Literature
 Reading with Emma Bovary
Fall 2021  17717 001SEM (3 Units)Open7 / 18 (7 / 18)Cheryl KruegerMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 291
 1857 obscenity trial against Flaubert and his publisher, prosecutor Ernest Pinard argued that the novel Madame Bovary would corrupt the hearts and minds of its readers, particularly young women and wives. Dangerous fiction is a dominant theme in the work itself. When Emma Bovary shows symptoms of “vaporous airs,” her husband and mother-in-law decide she must stop reading novels. This course focuses on reading habits in Madame Bovary, and on what they say about Flaubert’s aesthetic project; the social and medical discourses that Madame Bovary reflects and reinforces; and the education of women.  What did Emma Bovary read, how did she read it, and how have critics in the 19th-21st centuries read her reading? Inspired by the scholarly practice of close reading, and the cultural philosophy embraced by the Slow Movement, this course will build from the un-rushed reading of Madame Bovary, in conjunction with a selection of film adaptations, and transcripts from Flaubert’s obscenity trial. Social class, gender roles, psychology, medicine and hygiene, consumer culture, social history, and aesthetic innovation are among the topics the novel will lead us to explore. Students will steer the selection of secondary readings and materials for the class based on questions raised by the novel and in class discussion, using recommended digital resources (Gallica, Project Gutenberg, the MLA Database) and UVA Library print collections. The syllabus will be developed by course participants and is unique to the group of students who co-construct it. ●      Open to graduate students with reading knowledge of French ●      Course conducted in French and English (depending on students’ background) ●      Written work in French (for most French MA and Ph.D. students), or English ●      Most readings in French ***Since we will refer to pages in class quite often, please try to buy the 2014 GF paperback edition with an introduction by Bernard Ajac. This edition will be available at the University Book Store, and you can find it at other online bookstores (https://livre.fnac.com/a7232038/Gustave-Flaubert-Madame-Bovary#omnsearchpos=2)*** ____________________________________________________________
 FREN 5585Topics in Civilization / Cultural Studies
 Performing Change: Theater in France (17-20th c)
Fall 2021  13211 001Lecture (3 Units)Open7 / 15 (7 / 15)Philippe RogerTu 3:30pm - 6:15pmWeb-Based Course
 « Theater », Beaumarchais wrote at the end of the 18th century, « is a giant whose blows are lethal ». He should have known, being the author of The Marriage of Figaro, a play held responsible for the fall of the Bastille by many of his contemporaries! This course will explore the disturbing powers of theater, from the Classical Age to our days. An ill-famed entertainment in the eyes of the Church, it has often been regarded as the most prestigious achievement within the Republic of Letters. Strategically situated at the crossroads of literature and the performing arts, it has maintained a constant dialogue with the visual arts, from painting to cinema and, more recently, multimedia productions. For centuries, theater has been both a laboratory of artistic innovation, and a political agora, a hothouse of new ideas and provocative agendas. In sum, we will explore theater as a mirror of French artistic, intellectual and political life, with a special emphasis on the querelles and scandales that shook France, as well as the stage, from the « Cid Quarrel» to Genet's Les Paravents and Koltès' Roberto Zucco A detailed syllabus and more information can be found on the Collab site dedicated to this seminar.
 FREN 8510Seminar in Medieval Literature
 Race/Gender/Class & the Premodern
Fall 2021  13212 001Lecture (3 Units)Open8 / 18 (8 / 18)Deborah McGradyTh 3:30pm - 6:00pmContact Department
 This course will challenge the contemporary perception that premodern Europe was an all-white privileged masculine space by turning to creative works of the late medieval francophone world in which racialized, gendered and classed bodies take shape. This course will draw on exile and war poetry, popular theatre, romances of conquest, history writing and travel literature to investigate the role of power and privilege in the formation of premodern identity, the politics of othering, and the question of subaltern agency in late medieval society. Contemporary critical identity studies will be used to deepen our understanding of medieval culture at the same time that our medieval material will be mined for the new insights it brings to this criticism. Course taught in English, reading knowledge of modern French strongly recommended.
 FREN 8560Seminar in Nineteenth-Century Literature
 Reading with Emma Bovary
Fall 2021  17718 001Lecture (3 Units)Open7 / 18 (7 / 18)Cheryl KruegerMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 291
 1857 obscenity trial against Flaubert and his publisher, prosecutor Ernest Pinard argued that the novel Madame Bovary would corrupt the hearts and minds of its readers, particularly young women and wives. Dangerous fiction is a dominant theme in the work itself. When Emma Bovary shows symptoms of “vaporous airs,” her husband and mother-in-law decide she must stop reading novels. This course focuses on reading habits in Madame Bovary, and on what they say about Flaubert’s aesthetic project; the social and medical discourses that Madame Bovary reflects and reinforces; and the education of women.  What did Emma Bovary read, how did she read it, and how have critics in the 19th-21st centuries read her reading? Inspired by the scholarly practice of close reading, and the cultural philosophy embraced by the Slow Movement, this course will build from the un-rushed reading of Madame Bovary, in conjunction with a selection of film adaptations, and transcripts from Flaubert’s obscenity trial. Social class, gender roles, psychology, medicine and hygiene, consumer culture, social history, and aesthetic innovation are among the topics the novel will lead us to explore. Students will steer the selection of secondary readings and materials for the class based on questions raised by the novel and in class discussion, using recommended digital resources (Gallica, Project Gutenberg, the MLA Database) and UVA Library print collections. The syllabus will be developed by course participants and is unique to the group of students who co-construct it. ●      Open to graduate students with reading knowledge of French ●      Course conducted in French and English (depending on students’ background) ●      Written work in French (for most French MA and Ph.D. students), or English ●      Most readings in French ***Since we will refer to pages in class quite often, please try to buy the 2014 GF paperback edition with an introduction by Bernard Ajac. This edition will be available at the University Book Store, and you can find it at other online bookstores (https://livre.fnac.com/a7232038/Gustave-Flaubert-Madame-Bovary#omnsearchpos=2)***
 FREN 8585Seminar in Cultural Studies
 Performing Change: Theater in France (17-20th c)
Fall 2021  13213 001Lecture (3 Units)Open7 / 15 (7 / 15)Philippe RogerTu 3:30pm - 6:15pmWeb-Based Course
 « Theater », Beaumarchais wrote at the end of the 18th century, « is a giant whose blows are lethal ». He should have known, being the author of The Marriage of Figaro, a play held responsible for the fall of the Bastille by many of his contemporaries! This course will explore the disturbing powers of theater, from the Classical Age to our days. An ill-famed entertainment in the eyes of the Church, it has often been regarded as the most prestigious achievement within the Republic of Letters. Strategically situated at the crossroads of literature and the performing arts, it has maintained a constant dialogue with the visual arts, from painting to cinema and, more recently, multimedia productions. For centuries, theater has been both a laboratory of artistic innovation, and a political agora, a hothouse of new ideas and provocative agendas. In sum, we will explore theater as a mirror of French artistic, intellectual and political life, with a special emphasis on the querelles and scandales that shook France, as well as the stage, from the « Cid Quarrel» to Genet's Les Paravents and Koltès' Roberto Zucco A detailed syllabus and more information can be found on the Collab site dedicated to this seminar.
French in Translation
 FRTR 2580Topics in French and Francophone Culture
 Race in the US, France, and the Francophone World
Website  18993 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 6 / 15Bremen DonovanTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmFrench House 100
 Race in the US, France, and the Francophone World: Intersections and Divergences offers a unique opportunity for students to explore the politics of race and racialization in comparative and historical perspective. Invited scholars, artists, and activists will share their work and experiences with us over the course of the semester in a discussion-based environment. Together, we will also explore films, literature, oral histories, journalism, podcasts, and other means of engaging topics from policing to protest, language to law, memory to memorialization and flourishing. This is a 3-credit course taught in English. Some course materials will be available in French for those who would like that option.
German
 GERM 3000Advanced German
 Identity and Belonging
Fall 2021  11910 001SEM (3 Units)Open 16 / 18Paul DobrydenMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 303
 What does it mean to be German? What shapes our identities? Where do we belong? In this content-based advanced language course, we will investigate questions of identities and belonging in Germany. Among other topics, we will learn about the Afro-German movement and read the work of Afro-German activist and poet May Ayim. We will explore the graphic novel ‘Heimat,’ penned by German-born author Nora Krug, who decides to leave New York and face the Nazi-past of her home country and family. We will investigate these topics and authors through activities such as group discussions, short presentations, or writing exercises. Together, we will work on your communication skills in German and practice your speaking and writing. To help you communicate confidently in German, we will systematically review grammar topics at the upper intermediate level, selectively target grammar topics at the advanced level, and place special emphasis on questions of German sentence structure. You will leave this course with fresh confidence in your German skills!
 GERM 3230Contemporary German: Writing and Speaking
 Contemporary German: Writing and Speaking
Website  10513 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed 16 / 16William McDonaldTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmWeb-Based Course
 A new course offering an encounter with authentic German, as it is spoken and written in modern day contexts. The textbook is the Internet, from which students draw, then discuss current topics of individual choice, including world politics, environmental issues, and cultural events. Grammar review as needed. Cultures and Societies of the World’
 GERM 3559New Course in German
 Black German Literatures
Fall 2021  18339 001SEM (3 Units)Open 10 / 12Julia GuttermanTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmNew Cabell Hall 594
 This course considers the diverse styles and genres of Black German literatures written since the 1980s, ranging from Afro-German poetry to autobiography and autofiction, essay and activist writing, and spoken word performance. We engage with questions about the Black experience in Germany, identity production, and Black German literature in the global context of the Black diaspora. Readings include May Ayim, Olivia Wenzel, Sharon Dodua Otoo, Ijoma Mangold, and Philipp Khabo Köpsell. All readings and discussions in German. Prerequisite GERM 3010 or instructor’s permission. Course fulfills literature requirement for the German Major.
German in Translation
 GETR 3372German Jewish Culture and History
Fall 2021  14441 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 58 / 60 (58 / 60)Jeffrey Grossman+1TuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmMaury Hall 115
 This course provides a wide-ranging exploration of the history and culture of German (-speaking) Jewry from 1750 to 1945 and beyond. It focuses especially on the Jewish response to modernity in Central Europe, a response that proved highly productive, giving rise to a range of lasting transformations in Jewish life in European politics, society and culture. Until the mid-eighteenth century, Jewish self-definition was relatively stable. From that point on, it became increasingly contingent and open-ended. Before the rise of Nazism in 1933, German Jewish life was characterized by a plethora of emerging possibilities. This course explores this vibrant and dynamic process of change and self-definition. It traces the emergence of new forms of Jewish experience, and it shows their unfolding in a series of lively and poignant dramas of tradition and transformation, division and integration, dreams and nightmares. The course seeks to grasp this world through the lenses of history and culture, and to explore the different ways in which these disciplines illuminate the past and provide potential insights into the present and future. In addition to Jews in Germany, the course will also explore developments in Jewish life in Austria and Switzerland. This course is intended to acquaint students with the study of German (-speaking) Jewish history and culture and assumes no prior training in the subject. Class meetings will combine lecture and discussion. Course requirements will include essays of varying length. Conscientious participation in class discussion is expected. Readings will be drawn from both primary and secondary literature. Represented in the primary reading will be central figures in the annals of German-speaking Jewry, including Gotthold Ephraim Lessing, Rahel Varnhagen, Heinrich Heine, Arthur Schnitzler, Gershom Scholem, Franz Kafka, and Ruth Klüger. This course fulfills the Second Writing Requirement.
 GETR 3390Nazi Germany
Fall 2021  18405 100Lecture (3 Units)Open 54 / 60 (54 / 60)Manuela AchillesMoWe 10:00am - 10:50amDell 1 105
 This course examines the historical origins, political structures, social dynamics, cultural practices, and genocidal crimes of the Nazi Third Reich. Requirements include regular attendance, two essays, and a final examination. No prerequisites.
 GETR 3462Neighbors and Enemies
Fall 2021  18414 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 28 / 30 (28 / 30)Manuela AchillesMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 389
 A biblical injunction, first articulated in Leviticus and then elaborated in the Christian teachings, stipulates that one should love one’s neighbor as oneself. This course explores the friend/enemy nexus in German history, literature and culture. Of particular interest is the figure of the neighbor as both an imagined extension of the self, and as an object of fear or even hatred. We will examine the vulnerability and anxiety generated by Germany’s unstable and shifting territorial borders, as well as the role that fantasies of foreign infiltration played in defining German national identity. We will also investigate the racial and sexual politics manifested in Germany’s real or imagined encounters with various foreign “others.” Most importantly, this course will study the tensions in German history and culture between a chauvinist belief in German racial or cultural superiority and moments of genuine openness to strangers. In the concluding part of this course, we will consider the changing meanings of friendship and hospitality in a globalizing world. Requirements include regular attendance and three short essays. Fulfills the second writing and historical requirements. No examinations. No prerequisites.
 GETR 3464Medieval Stories of Love and Adventure
 Medieval Stories of Love and Adventure
Website  14190 001SEM (3 Units)Closed 34 / 34William McDonaldTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmWeb-Based Course
 An interactive course, involving reading, discussion, music, and art, that seeks, through selected stories of the medieval period, to shed light on institutions, themes, and customs. At the center is the Heroic Circle, a cycle with connections to folklore, the fairy tale, and Jungian psychology—all of which illuminate the human experience. Discover here the genesis of Arthurian film, Star Wars, Game of Thrones, and more. All texts on Collab. Second Writing Requirement Cultures and Societies of the World
Global Studies-Global Studies
 GSGS 4559New Course in Global Studies
 Multiculturalism and Settler Colonialism
Fall 2021  18870 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 13 / 15Helena ZeweriTu 3:30pm - 6:00pmNew Cabell Hall 066
  This seminar is a deep dive into the history of multiculturalism as a philosophy and a set of policies at the center of modern settler colonial nation-states. We will examine the double-edged sword of multiculturalism: how it has recognized difference and diversity yet continued to keep communities in place. How can we think about multiculturalism as part of settler colonial ideas of conquest, erasure, and the management of populations?
GS-Middle East and South Asia
 GSMS 3559New Course: GSMS
 Development in South Asia & Sub-Saharan Africa
Fall 2021  19877 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 8 / 30Muhammad Tayyab SafdarTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmNew Cabell Hall 338
 South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa are two of the most important developing regions in the World. Despite their growth potential, many countries in both regions suffer from high incidences of absolute poverty and rank low on the UN’s Human Development Index. What explains this lack of progress within countries in these regions after decades of independence? To answer this complex question, this course will critically examine the role of the state and external development actors on growth and development within these two regions. Throughout the course, we will link theories of economic growth with empirical evidence and help students develop a better understanding of the reasons that can explain the heterogeneity in growth and economic development between different countries within these regions and the effect on people’s lives.
Global Studies-Security and Justice
 GSSJ 3559New Course in Global Security and Justice
 Refugee Mobilities, Border Zones, and Human Rights
Fall 2021  18868 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed 20 / 20Helena ZeweriTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmContact Department
 What is the experience of being displaced and looking for a better life? When a refugee reaches their ‘final destination,’ what is their experience of arrival? How are the movements, journeys and pathways of refugees cause for concern for the nation-state? This interdisciplinary course examines the relationship between refugee journeys (mobility), the hardships they confront (vulnerability), and the places in which these take place (border zones).
 Gender, Race & Humanitarianism
Fall 2021  18866 002Lecture (3 Units)Open 38 / 40Helena ZeweriTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmClark Hall G004
 This course examines the gendered and racialized aspects of humanitarian interventions and projects throughout the world. We will look at how the recipients of humanitarian aid are represented within organization literature, advocacy material, film, and within media coverage. What can an understanding of such gendered and racial biases tell us about humanitarianism’s stated commitment to neutrality and universality? What alternative possibilities exist for inclusive and equitable forms of humanitarianism today?
Global Studies-Environments and Sustainability
 GSVS 3559New Course in Global Environments and Sustainability
 Natural Resource Policy at Home and Abroad
Fall 2021  18867 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 29 / 32Spencer PhillipsMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmGibson Hall 211
 In this course, students will survey the main currents of U.S. and international natural resource policy (air and water quality, endangered species protection, public land management, private land conservation, participation in international conventions), consider their origins in broader streams of conservation thought (utilitarian, romantic, progressive), and learn to evaluate and assess these policies using examples from current natural resource and environmental challenges (energy independence, biodiversity loss, recreational access, climate change). Students will also gain familiarity with the actors and processes by which environmental policy decisions are made (Congress, agencies, interest groups, appropriations, oversight, rulemaking, and environmental and related assessments). Principal assignments will be themed around “live”/current natural resource policy making. A Washington DC field tour (tentative) provides a chance to hear from environmental policy-makers, analysts and advocates. Instruction for the course will be primarily through discussion of reading assignments (Thoreau, Leopold, Carson, et al. but also legislation, CFR, Federal Register, and agency and public input into policy processes). Lecture will be used to present/emphasize key processes, analytical frameworks (e.g. environmental assessments and environmental impact statements) and how politics plays into policy.
 GSVS 4559New Course in Global Environments & Sustainability
 Sustainability Practicum & Evidence-Based Policy
 Sustainability Practicum & Evidence-Based Policy
Fall 2021  18871 001Lecture (3 Units)Open20 / 30Spencer PhillipsTh 3:30pm - 6:00pmNau Hall 211
 Wendell Berry wrote: “A crowd whose discontent has risen no higher than the level of slogans is only a crowd. But a crowd that understands the reasons for its discontent and knows the remedies is a vital community, and it will have to be reckoned with.” In this course, we use “problem-based learning” to develop relevant facts and sound arguments surrounding local, national, and global sustainability challenges. We will work with live case studies in the U.S. and abroad, and follow the steps from problem formation, through model building, data collection, and qualitative and quantitative analysis, and finally on to technical and advocacy communications grounded in our facts.
History-European History
 HIEU 3390Nazi Germany
Fall 2021  18247 100Lecture (3 Units)Open 54 / 60 (54 / 60)Manuela AchillesMoWe 10:00am - 10:50amDell 1 105
 This course examines the historical origins, political structures, social dynamics, cultural practices, and genocidal crimes of the Nazi Third Reich. Requirements include regular attendance, two essays, and a final examination. No prerequisites.
 HIEU 3462Neighbors and Enemies in Germany
Fall 2021  18534 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 28 / 30 (28 / 30)Manuela AchillesMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 389
 A biblical injunction, first articulated in Leviticus and then elaborated in the Christian teachings, stipulates that one should love one’s neighbor as oneself. This course explores the friend/enemy nexus in German history, literature and culture. Of particular interest is the figure of the neighbor as both an imagined extension of the self, and as an object of fear or even hatred. We will examine the vulnerability and anxiety generated by Germany’s unstable and shifting territorial borders, as well as the role that fantasies of foreign infiltration played in defining German national identity. We will also investigate the racial and sexual politics manifested in Germany’s real or imagined encounters with various foreign “others.” Most importantly, this course will study the tensions in German history and culture between a chauvinist belief in German racial or cultural superiority and moments of genuine openness to strangers. In the concluding part of this course, we will consider the changing meanings of friendship and hospitality in a globalizing world. Requirements include regular attendance and three short essays. Fulfills the second writing and historical requirements. No examinations. No prerequisites.
 HIEU 3501Introductory History Workshop
 Early Modern Bodies
 Early Modern Bodies from Plague to Pox
Fall 2021  19453 001SEM (3 Units)Open 14 / 15Erin LambertMo 3:30pm - 6:00pmNau Hall 141
 See class details page for course description.
 Seminar provides an intro to sources and approaches to historical study. Content includes conceptions of body, health, disease c. 1450-1750, with attention to gender, race, colonialism, etc. How did people in the past understand bodies, health, and sickness? How can historians access topics for which written sources don't often provide direct evidence, such as sexuality? How can we study the body through different lenses: religious ritual, history of medicine, archaeology, etc? By asking these questions, we'll learn how historians think about their work, and students will develop research and writing skills that are essential for history majors.
 Crime, Scandal, & Politics in Fin-de-Siècle Europe
 History Workshop: Crime, Scandal, & Politics in Fin-de-Siècle Europe
Fall 2021  19454 002SEM (3 Units)Closed 16 / 15Jennifer SessionsMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmGibson Hall 241
 In this new History Workshop seminar, we'll explore the uses of crime for understanding the past, with a focus on European society, culture, and politics around 1900. We will study spectacular, scandalous, and ordinary cases that shed light on issues such as nationalism and anti-Semitism, race and empire, gender and sexuality, urbanization and mass culture at time of rapid change, and explore the methods historians have used to analyze them. Students will apply the research methods they learn in collaborative research projects focused on one specific case.
History-General History
 HIST 5501Historical Geospatial Visualization
 Working with Historic Maps
Fall 2021  18265 001SEM (3 Units)Permission9 / 15S. EdelsonTh 2:00pm - 4:30pmGibson Hall 242
 This workshop introduces advanced undergraduate and graduate students to digital research featuring geospatial data and the practice of map history. With the assistance of the Scholars’ Lab’s GIS specialists, we will introduce you to the industry-standard ESRI suite of geographic information systems tools--ArcGIS Pro, ArcGIS Online, and ArcGIS StoryMaps. Through a series of tutorials designed for historical research, you will learn to build geospatial layers and create interactive digital visualizations. You will apply what you have learned by creating GIS content that advances your particular research projects--assembling a group of maps relating to your research that you will visualize. We will spend time in Special Collections working with original maps and consulting cartobibliographies and other reference works. We will also review compelling digital scholarship and read about the art and science of visual design as we become proficient in creating dynamic maps of the past. This course counts as an elective for the Graduate Digital Humanities Certificate program.
 HIST 7001Approaches to Historical Study
Fall 2021  12017 001SEM (3 Units)Closed16 / 16Allan Megill+1Mo 2:00pm - 4:30pmNau Hall 241
 Click on the five digits to the left of this class listing, for further information.
 (This class is restricted to, and required for, first-year History PhD students; it may also be appropriate for some MA students in history. It is likely to be inappropriate for other students.) This seminar, required of all first-year doctoral students in the History Department, is designed to introduce students in all fields and periods to the theory, methods, and craft of historical writing and to familiarize them with professional practice in the academy. The primary aim of the seminar is to develop critical perspectives on the art and science of historical writing through close reading and vigorous discussion of a chronologically, geographically, and methodologically diverse array of books and articles selected by the instructor. In the process, readings and discussions will introduce fields, methods, theoretical debates, narrative techniques, and analytical paradigms. As models of historical inquiry, professional scholarship, and nonfiction writing, readings will also facilitate broader conversations on the process of choosing research topics and structuring dissertations. With this shared intellectual foundation, students will be prepared for the transition to the second part of the first-year sequence, the MA Thesis writing seminar, HIST 8001.
History-United States History
 HIUS 3081History of the American Deaf Community
Fall 2021  19831 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 24 / 28 (24 / 28)Christopher KrentzMoWe 3:30pm - 4:45pmNew Cabell Hall 168
 Examines the history of deaf people in the United States over the last three centuries, with particular attention to the emergence and evolution of a community of Deaf people who share a distinct sign language and culture. We will read both primary texts from specific periods (by writers like Laurent Clerc and Alexander Graham Bell) and secondary sources (such as Douglas Baynton's Forbidden Signs and Carol Padden and Tom Humphries’ Inside Deaf Culture). We will also view a few historical films. Among other topics, we will consider how hearing society has treated deaf people and the reasons for this treatment; how deaf people have explained and advocated for themselves; how the deaf community complicates our understanding of linguistic and ethnic minorities and of disabled people in the United States; the impact of technology; and what changing constructions of deafness reveal about the history of American culture in general. The class will be taught in spoken English with an interpreter and has no prerequisite, though a background in ASL or in History might be helpful.
 HIUS 9023Tutorial in Early American History to 1763
 English America in the Seventeenth Century
Fall 2021  20979 001IND (3 Units)Open6 / 9S. EdelsonTBATBA
 In this tutorial, we examine the origins and development of England’s American colonies; encounters among Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans; the volatile religious, social, and geopolitical dynamics that shaped colonial societies; and changing conceptions of empire--among other topics. As we discuss a wide-ranging list of historical monographs, we will also read and discuss selections from John Ogilby’s America (1671). This influential, Restoration-era compendium summarized European knowledge of the Americas and illustrated it with copious maps and images. Students will write a 10-15 page historiographical essay that draws from these readings.
Latin
 LATI 3010Plautus
Fall 2021  18707 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed 16 / 15Inger Neeltje Irene KuinMoWeFr 12:00pm - 12:50pmMonroe Hall 116
 Class fulfills Second Writing Requirement.
 In this course we will study the works of Plautus as a key moment in the history both of Latin literature and of comedy as such. Our starting point will be a close reading (translation and analysis) of Plautus Pseudolus in Latin, and of three other Plautine plays in English translation. Through in class reading of the Latin text and discussion of literary and cultural issues we will attempt to understand Plautus' comedy. Attention will be given to Plautus' language, poetic technique, and to the interpretation of his plays within their historical and generic context. We will examine Plautus' use of his Greek models, as well as his stagecraft and the performance of the plays. Careful translation of the Latin will be stressed, including grammar review.
Leadership and Public Policy - Policy
 LPPP 3500Special Topics in Social Entrepreneurship
 Equity by Design: Transformative Social Enterprise
 Building Equity through Social Enterprises
Fall 2021  20614 001Lecture (3 Units)Open8 / 30Andreas AddisonWe 3:30pm - 6:00pmMinor Hall 130
 Explore the process for creating transformational social enterprises from a foundation of human-centered design, historical and social context of inequalities, and empathy-building to achieve lasting equity. Learn how to build community wealth through developing social enterprises as new gateways for access to new opportunities.
 Social entrepreneurs desire to create a world that is diverse, inclusive, and accessible. We seek to advance equitable human rights by addressing social and economic injustices. At the root of this motivation lies the exploration of how to create a business venture that creates access to opportunity by providing employment, new skills, or access to needed services. Equity by Design will cultivate your abilities to create transformative social enterprises. This course will refine the skills, techniques, and approaches needed to develop transformative social enterprises. We will explore bias, apply human-centered design, and discover how to build empathy with our customers. Vital to creating a successful venture, is to understand the origins, context, and impact of the challenges facing the individuals we are trying to reach. We will learn to understand the problem from the customer's perspective, not from our observation. We will learn how to simplify the complex and understand how to reach the goal of your business intentionally and purposefully. Throughout the semester, we will hear from national social entrepreneurs and policy leaders about the importance of building equity and the importance of creating new transformative social enterprises. At the end of the semester, you will have developed an understanding of the skills, techniques, and approaches needed to create your enterprise.
 LPPP 4500Topics in Public Policy and Leadership
 Public Speaking Workshop
Fall 2021  17135 001SEM (1 Units)Open8 / 10 (13 / 20)Denise StewartWe 7:00pm - 9:30pmMonroe Hall 122
 This highly-interactive, skill-building course is broken into 4 smaller workshops: Storytelling for Public Speaking, Improv for Public Speaking, Strengthening Presence, and Interview Techniques. The last evening of the 5-week course is reserved for final presentations and a full review of all skills. Students will receive in-class coaching each week to: build confidence, skills, and enjoyment in public speaking; to explore and apply vocal and physical techniques; to cultivate rehearsal and event preparation habits regarding scheduled and improvised/surprise public speaking situations; to cultivate and deepen the ability to work within an ensemble/team which includes the offering and receiving of effective feedback.
 This highly-interactive, skill-building course is broken into 4 smaller workshops: Storytelling for Public Speaking, Improv for Public Speaking, Strengthening Presence, and Interview Techniques. The last evening of the 5-week course is reserved for final presentations and a full review of all skills. Students will receive in-class coaching each week to: build confidence, skills, and enjoyment in public speaking; to explore and apply vocal and physical techniques; to cultivate rehearsal and event preparation habits regarding scheduled and improvised/surprise public speaking situations; to cultivate and deepen the ability to work within an ensemble/team which includes the offering and receiving of effective feedback.
 LPPP 5559New Course in Public Policy and Leadership
 Global Climate Change: Rising to the Challenge
 Global Climate Change
Fall 2021  20413 002Lecture (3 Units)Open14 / 20Daniel ReifsnyderWe 2:00pm - 4:30pmContact Department
 Global climate change and our societal response are one of the most urgent but contentious debates of our time. The Biden Administration and progressive members of Congress call for zero net greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, while former President Trump withdrew from the Paris Agreement and sought to roll back every discoverable climate milestone of the Obama-era. In a single semester, this course will cover the most salient aspects of the crisis, from the science of climate change, to national and international scientific assessment, to the continuing campaign of climate denial. It will consider the benefits of mitigating versus adapting to climate change, and why adaptation is so crucial to developing countries. The course will assess the three major international efforts taken to date, including the 1992 UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, and the 2015 Paris Agreement. In particular, it will weigh the competing goals of effectiveness versus broad national participation. It will highlight the role of the major financing mechanisms, including Global Environment Facility, the Green Climate Fund, as well as emissions trading schemes and offset mechanisms, and explain why finance has been so central to international negotiations. The course will weigh China’s role and the importance of the U.S.-China relationship in providing global leadership. Finally, the course will delve into the issues of ethics and environmental justice and look at the roles of Congress, the States, cities and the private sector. The course is taught by a former senior U.S. State Department negotiator who played a pivotal role in negotiating the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol, and who co-chaired the final year of negotiations among 197 parties leading to the Paris Agreement in December 2015.
 SIS Description: Among the most urgent but contentious issues on the current agenda are global climate change and our societal response. Course covers climate science, int’l assessment & continuing campaign of climate denial. Looks at UN Framework Convention, Kyoto Protocol & Paris Agreement, their approaches, funding efforts & weighting of adaptation v. mitigation. Explores US-China relationship, equity & social justice, and Congress, States, cities and private sector as climate players.
 LPPP 6500Topics in Public Policy
 Public Speaking Workshop
Fall 2021  17131 003SEM (1 Units)Open5 / 10 (13 / 20)Denise StewartWe 7:00pm - 9:30pmMonroe Hall 122
 This highly-interactive, skill-building course is broken into 4 smaller workshops: Storytelling for Public Speaking, Improv for Public Speaking, Strengthening Presence, and Interview Techniques. The last evening of the 5-week course is reserved for final presentations and a full review of all skills. Students will receive in-class coaching each week to: build confidence, skills, and enjoyment in public speaking; to explore and apply vocal and physical techniques; to cultivate rehearsal and event preparation habits regarding scheduled and improvised/surprise public speaking situations; to cultivate and deepen the ability to work within an ensemble/team which includes the offering and receiving of effective feedback.
 This highly-interactive, skill-building course is broken into 4 smaller workshops: Storytelling for Public Speaking, Improv for Public Speaking, Strengthening Presence, and Interview Techniques. The last evening of the 5-week course is reserved for final presentations and a full review of all skills. Students will receive in-class coaching each week to: build confidence, skills, and enjoyment in public speaking; to explore and apply vocal and physical techniques; to cultivate rehearsal and event preparation habits regarding scheduled and improvised/surprise public speaking situations; to cultivate and deepen the ability to work within an ensemble/team which includes the offering and receiving of effective feedback.
Leadership and Public Policy - Substantive
 LPPS 3160Project 1st Gen+ @UVA
Website  17126 001SEM (3 Units)Open3 / 20Paul MartinTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmThe Rotunda Room 152
 The class will operate as an applied policy lab, identifying problems and advocating for policy changes that will make UVA a place where First Generation and/or Low Income (FGLI) students thrive. See https://projectfirstgenuva.mystrikingly.com/
 
 LPPS 3295Global Humanitarian Crises Response
Fall 2021  19702 001Lecture (3 Units)Open145 / 150Kirsten GelsdorfTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmMinor Hall 125
 Taught by a former United Nations official with two decades of experience working in humanitarian aid, this course will look at critical questions defining global humanitarian action and policy. The inability to deliver aid inside Syria, the growth of private sector involvement in humanitarian response, the challenges of providing accountability to affected populations, the complexity of addressing migration and refugee flows, are only some of the policy questions being faced in the humanitarian aid sector. Using practical real-time assignments, historical and critical analysis and case studies; the foundations, dilemmas, and operational realities of providing humanitarian aid will be explored. This class will include guest lectures from other humanitarian responders and practitioners currently serving in crisis zones.
 Taught by a former United Nations official with two decades of experience working in humanitarian aid, this course will look at critical questions defining global humanitarian action and policy. The inability to deliver aid inside Syria, the growth of private sector involvement in humanitarian response, the challenges of providing accountability to affected populations, the complexity of addressing migration and refugee flows, are only some of the policy questions being faced in the humanitarian aid sector. Using historical and critical analysis and case studies; the foundations, dilemmas, and operational realities of providing humanitarian aid will be explored. This class will include practical and professional assignments, as well as guest lectures from other humanitarian responders and practitioners currently serving in crisis zones.
 LPPS 3460Introduction to Policy & the Legislative Process
Fall 2021  17115 001Lecture (3 Units)Open19 / 30Brooke LehmannTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmRidley Hall 139
 Study how landmark social policies have shaped this nation, its laws, & its people. Students will analyze policies that strive for equality, protection, & prevention with respect to those whose access to justice & human privilege has been compromised. Learn about the legislative process & how to influence the course of this process, & determine how to work w/in that context to achieve change in real-world social policy. This is a dynamic class that includes lots of discussion, small group work as well as conversations, and analysis of real-time legislative issues/actions of the professor. Students will learn not only how and why laws are created and influenced by the broader landscape at that point in time, but also develop the skills necessary for being a successful agent of change at the local, state, and federal policy levels. Invited guest lectures include federal legislative staff and advocates/policy experts from a broad spectrum of social policy including areas such as the prison system, education, social determinants of health, civil rights, and other social policies that have changed or been challenged due to COVID.
 Study how landmark social policies have shaped this nation, its laws, & its people. Students will analyze policies that strive for equality, protection, & prevention with respect to those whose access to justice & human privilege has been compromised. Learn about the legislative process & how to influence the course of this process, & determine how to work w/in that context to achieve change in real-world social policy. This is a dynamic class that includes lots of discussion, small group work as well as discussions and analysis of real-time legislative issues/actions of the professor.
Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering
 MAE 6592Special Topics in Mechanical and Aerospace Science: Intermediate Level
 Impact Mechanics
Fall 2021  18884 005Lecture (3 Units)Open7 / 20Matthew PanzerTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmContact Department
 This course is taught at the Center for Applied Biomechanics, which is an off grounds facility about 25 min away from the main campus. This course pre-requisites are: MAE6020 Continuum Mechanics, MAE6080 Constitutive Modeling of Biosystems, and MAE6710 Finite Element Analysis.
 Impact mechanics is concerned with the reaction forces that develop during a collision and the dynamic response of structures to these reaction forces. The subject has a wide range of engineering applications, from designing sports equipment to improving the crashworthiness of automobiles. This course builds on a foundation in dynamics and strength of materials, and develops several different methodologies for analyzing collisions between structures. These range from rigid body theory for structures that are stiff and compact, to transient wave analyses in deformable bodies, to large deformation and inelastic response. Topics will also include numerous industrially- and scientifically-relevant discussions on blast and ballistic impact, vehicle collision, personal protection, and energy absorbing materials. This course will also focus on experimental methods for quantifying impact response, including linear impactor and drop testing, and computational methods for simulating impact response using explicit non-linear finite element solvers.
Media Studies
 MDST 3504Topics in Global Media
 Cinema, Politics, and Society in South Asia
 Classroom: Clark 133
Fall 2021  17667 005SEM (3 Units)Open13 / 30Sayan BanerjeeWe 2:00pm - 4:30pmContact Department
 Students majoring in any major can sign up for the course.
 This course will use a collection of assorted films to study the contours of politics and society in India, and greater South Asia, since Independence from colonial rule. The course will investigate important questions on economic development, inequality, ethnicity, conflict, terrorism, and political development in South Asia guided by critically celebrated films and supported by academic scholarship from multiple social science disciplines. Readings would span Communications/Media Studies, Political Science, Sociology, Economics, and relevant interdisciplinary fields.
 MDST 3508Advanced Topics in Media Practice
 News Documentary Production
 News Documentary Production
Fall 2021  17628 001SEM (3 Units)Permission 4 / 18Wyatt AndrewsTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmNew Cabell Hall 036
 This course requires instructor permission.
      Experienced student reporters and videographers will report and produce 2 long form video news stories or short documentaries, all in teams. Prior experience and skills in reporting or video production is a pre-req. Teams will consist of reporters and producer/videographers. On-camera reporting teams doing stories in the style of 60 Minutes are welcome, but teams can also choose to do narration-less videos, in the style of most Netflix productions. Subjects can include news, sports, business, science or lifestyle topics. Class time will model and deconstruct the best long form news and sports documentaries.
 MDST 3559New Course in Media Studies
 Food, Media, and Popular Culture
Fall 2021  19779 004SEM (3 Units)Closed30 / 30Pallavi RaoMoWeFr 1:00pm - 1:50pmBryan Hall 235
 How do the media tell the story of the food we eat? Media representations of food across time and place offer us a lens through which we can understand the cultural politics of food production, preparation, consumption and commercialization. Studying a range of food media genres from food writing and cookbooks to food porn, Mukbangs, dietary media, food countercultures, celebrity chefs, travel shows and competitive cooking programming, this course will explore media storytelling about and around food, along with the racial, ethnic, gendered, class, and trans/national complexities that characterize our food narratives. A word of advice not to come to our class hungry!
Middle Eastern & South Asian Languages & Cultures
 MESA 2300Crossing Borders: Middle East and South Asia
Fall 2021  11894 100Lecture (3 Units)Closed 35 / 35Richard CohenTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 032
 This course fulfills the Non-Western Requirement. Based on the amount of writing for the course, I will sign a Second Writing Requirement Form on successful completion of the course.
 A broad survey of the deep history of cultural and economic links between the Middle East, Swahili Coast and South Asia (primarily India). I also cover colonization of the region, plus the reaction to coloniization in the 19th and 20th centuries.
Materials Science and Engineering
 MSE 6592Topics in Material Science
 Introduction to the Materials Science of Polymers
Syllabus  18848 004Lecture (3 Units)Open11 / 13 (14 / 20)Liheng CaiTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amMechanical Engineering 305
 Polymers are ubiquitous in modern society. This course provides a foundation for the rigorous understanding of polymers and polymeric materials from molecule to the macroscopic viewpoint. Single polymers, solutions, melts, crystalline and glassy states, gels and networks are developed sequentially to explain the fundamental, physical origin of mesoscale phase behavior and macroscale rheological, mechanical, optical, and electric properties.
Medieval Studies
 MSP 3501Exploring the Middle Ages
 Medieval Identities, Cultures, and Conflicts
 Medieval Identities and Cultures
Fall 2021  14539 001SEM (3 Units)Open 18 / 25Deborah McGradyTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmContact Department
 CLASS LOCATION IS BOND HOUSE, RM 116 This is an introductory course to the medieval period. First years are enthusiastically invited to take this class and will find a guided entry into upper-level coursework. Fulfills the Historical Discipline requirement of the New Curriculum and Second Writing Requirement is possible with instructor approval.
 If you think the medieval period was a backwards and barbaric time, think again! This course will challenge your preconceptions about the past by introducing you anew to a period marked by cross-cultural encounters, scientific discovery, religious and philosophical revolutions, and exploration of identity through culture, gender, and race. To experience the full richness of the world cultures from roughly 300 to 1500, a number of guest lectures from UVA faculty will enrich our readings drawn from the francophone tradition and ranging from crusading literature, Marco Polo’s Travels, works of the first professional female writer – Christine de Pizan, and the trial of Joan of Arc. Course assignments will include regular response papers, collaborative class presentations, and a final research project that will take the form of a traditional paper, a podcast, or a creative work.
Music
 MUSI 3020Studies in Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Music
Fall 2021  20416 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 10 / 25Justin MuellerTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmOld Cabell Hall 107
 This course will explore music of the later Baroque and Classical eras, from roughly 1680 to 1810. It will provide not only a deeper understanding of the composers we discuss and the compositional practices of the time, but also address issues germane to musico-dramatic realisation as they have been understood and debated, then and now. These will include questions of improvisation, performance practice, text–music relationships, and questions of staging and dramaturgy, among other topics. We will also read what people of the time were saying about this music, too—not just professional performers or music teachers, but critics, amateurs, listeners, philosophers, and others. This is all to suggest that we will not only come to know the pieces and composers we study in their own right, but also how they fit into the broader socio-political climate of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.
 MUSI 3559New Course in Music
 Amplified Justice
  Amplified Justice
Website  17623 001Lecture (3 Units)Open14 / 15Bonnie Gordon+1TuTh 9:30am - 10:45amContact Department
 Location Wilson 133
 This yearlong community engagement course explores connections between sound, listening, and the law. We will address topics such as music as a form of evidence in legal cases, audio live streaming of Supreme Court hearings, the use of audio technology in the courtroom, and voice, race, and gender in the criminal justice system. Students will have the opportunity to work with legal and social justice practitioners in Charlottesville and to visit courtrooms and other public spaces to reflect on the role of sound in our political and legal processes. Course materials will include music, film, novels, and academic articles. Students will also have the opportunity to produce creative work based on their observations around sound and justice.
 MUSI 3570Music Cultures
 Curating Sound: Art, Ethnography, and Practice
 Curating Sound: art, ethnography and practice
Fall 2021  20056 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 14 / 15Noel Lobley+1MoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmContact Department
 No prior musical experience is necessary.
 This practical and discovery-driven design course explores the intersections of curatorial practice, sound studies, ethnography, composition, sound art, and community arts practice, through a series of engagements linking archival collections, local and international artists and art and community spaces, and the method and philosophies of embodied and experiential deep listening. Drawing from both the histories and potential affordances of sound curation we engage with practical examples ranging from sub-Saharan Africa to Australia, and from Europe to New York, asking what it means to curate local sound within globalized arts circuits. We will explore multiple and diverse case studies where artists, curators, communities, industries and institutions have both collaborated and clashed, as we ask whether it is desirable or even possible to curate the elusive, invasive and ephemeral object, medium and experience of sound. Throughout the entire course we will be working closely with professional artists and curators most notably Around HipHop Live Café and the Black Power Station based in Makhanda, South Africa. Our work will be to design content for live exhibitions linking Charlottesville with South Africa and elsewhere.
 MUSI 4507Composers
 Meet the Beatles
Fall 2021  20343 001Lecture (3 Units)Open12 / 15Scott DeVeauxMoWeFr 11:00am - 11:50amOld Cabell Hall B012
 "Meet the Beatles" is a survey of the Beatles’s music. We will begin by thinking about how American pop was absorbed in the city of Liverpool, learning about rock ‘n roll while imagining what it meant far from our shores. We will marvel at the phenomenon known as “Beatlemania,” an explosion that eclipsed every other pop infatuation before or since. We can think through the individual personalities of John, Paul, George, and Ringo (last names not needed), both as lived realities and as marketed personae through recordings, film, television. We can watch them grow in startling fashion, from the teen idols of 1964 to introspective songwriters of 1966 to the creators in the studio masterpieces in 1968. We can try to imagine how their creativity was shaped by illegal drugs (amphetamines, marijuana, LSD, heroin), and how we should understand their recordings in that light. We can think through everything we know about rock history, or the 1960s, from the perspective of their brief careers. Over the course of the semester, we will listen closely to the Beatles’ music, doing our best to understand it in as many ways possible. Some of this will be analytical (which is why I expect you to have taken MUSI 3310, Theory I, or to have some practical experience thinking about chords, forms, and melodies). Much of this will be devoted to understanding Lennon-McCartney, the group’s primary songwriting team (yes, and also Harrison); but we will also immerse ourselves in the Beatles’ vast and varied repertoire before 1963, when they learned how to play American pop through recordings. And we will continuously try to keep ourselves aware of their contemporaries, such as Brian Wilson and the Beach Boys (whose album Pet Sounds inspired Sgt. Pepper) and their rivals, the Rolling Stones.
 MUSI 4509Cultural and Historical Studies of Music
 The Music of Richard Wagner
 The Music of Richard Wagner
Fall 2021  14288 001SEM (3 Units)Open 8 / 15Justin MuellerWe 2:00pm - 4:30pmOld Cabell Hall B012
 This course seeks to explore the professional career and musical output of Richard Wagner, a polarizing figure in the world of Western music whose social, political, and theatrical ideologies have influenced everything from Hitler to Hollywood. With an in-depth look at works spanning the length of his compositional career, our meetings will serve as an occasion to assess how Wagner’s operas have been received on-stage and off by tracing their socio-political import and dramaturgical history from the time of their premieres through to the present. In addition to grappling with the works themselves, we will look at Wagner’s own writings on various subjects, as well as a variety of musical, literary, political, and philosophical ideas that inspired them, with a view to how and why performers, spectators, and scholars think through, understand, and come to reckon with the composer and his works in a twenty-first century context.
 MUSI 4545Computer Applications in Music
 Designing Audio Effect Plug
 Designing Audio Effect Plugins
Fall 2021  13370 001Lecture (3 Units)Permission 6 / 15Luke DahlMoWe 3:00pm - 4:15pmOld Cabell Hall B011
 Audio effects are common and useful tools used in the recording, mixing, and mastering of music and sound, as well as in sound design. This course focuses on understanding, designing and implementing audio effects, and using them for musical projects. We will cover the signal processing involved in effects such as EQ, delay, chorus, flanger, reverb, distortion, and compression, and we will implement these effects as VST or AudioUnit plug-ins by programming in C/C++ and using the JUCE framework. We will emphasize the musical application of our designs, and as a final project students will create a unique new effect that addresses their own musical goals. In other words we will learn fundamental aspects of digital audio, how audio effects work, how all real-time audio processing works "under the hood", and we will design and build our own audio effects. Enrollment is by instructor permission. Students are expected to have experience using digital audio tools (for example as covered in Musi 2350 or Musi 3390), and to have an ongoing music-making or sound-based practice. Previous programming experience is _highly_ desirable.
 MUSI 7510Cultural and Historical Studies of Music
 Music in Relation to Sexuality and Disability
Fall 2021  14290 001Lecture (3 Units)Open7 / 10Fred MausWe 3:00pm - 5:30pmOld Cabell Hall S008
 This seminar considers music in relation to sexuality and disability, drawing on The Oxford Handbook of Music and Queerness and The Oxford Handbook of Music and Disability Studies along with other scholarly writing from the 1990s on.
Physics
 PHYS 1660Practical Computing for the Physical Sciences
Website  12206 001Lecture (1 Units)Open 18 / 20Bryan WrightMo 2:00pm - 2:50pmPhysics Bldg 022C
 This course, PHYS 1660, will give you a kit of skills and tools that will help you do great things even if you're not a mathematical prodigy. All you need is a little computing expertise. This course is designed for novice programmers: no programming experience is required! We'll teach you all the basic skills you need.
Website  12616 002Lecture (1 Units)Open 16 / 20Bryan WrightWe 3:00pm - 3:50pmPhysics Bldg 022C
 This course, PHYS 1660, will give you a kit of skills and tools that will help you do great things even if you're not a mathematical prodigy. All you need is a little computing expertise. This course is designed for novice programmers: no programming experience is required! We'll teach you all the basic skills you need.
 PHYS 2010Principles of Physics 1 for Pre-Health Students
 Asynchronous online section of PHYS 2010 (note that exams will be taken in person)
Website  20235 003Lecture (3 Units)Open 48 / 50Olivier PfisterTBATBA
 Instructor's email: opfister@virginia.edu. Class email: phys2010_online@collab.its.virginia.edu
 This is an asynchronous online section of PHYS 2010, designed for students whose schedules conflict with the in-person sections.
 PHYS 5250Mathematical Methods of Physics I
Fall 2021  12854 001Lecture (3 Units)Open2 / 30Marija VuceljaMoWeFr 12:00pm - 12:50pmPhysics Bldg 218
 Overrides the SIS comments: Prerequisites: Courses: MATH 4210 and 4220 or instructor's permission.
 Overrides the SIS description: The MMPI course is designed to familiarize you with a variety of mathematical topics that are widely used in physics. The topics will be accessible for 3rd, 4th-year undergraduates, and graduate students. The material will be customized to the students taking the course. Part of the topics will be by audience choice.
 PHYS 5720Introduction to Nuclear and Particle Physics
Syllabus  10957 001Lecture (3 Units)Open10 / 30Stefan BaesslerTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmPhysics Bldg 210
 This course gives an introduction into subatomic physics for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students. We will discuss the foundations and recent achievements of the field of elementary particle and nuclear physics. Most of the semester will be spent on the Standard Model of Elementary Particle Physics, including topics such as conservation laws and Feynman diagram calculations (Don't be intimidated by the sight of "Feynman diagrams", we will take small steps). This course does not replace, or is made obsolete with a course in quantum field theory. The undergraduate course in Applied Nuclear Physics (PHYS 3250) is NOT a pre-requisite.
Politics-Comparative Politics
 PLCP 4500Special Topics in Comparative Politics
 Nation-Building
Fall 2021  18457 003SEM (3 Units)Closed 16 / 15David WaldnerMo 4:30pm - 7:00pmGibson Hall 142
 In this research seminar, we consider why American occupation-based, nation-building produced capitalist, liberal democracies in Germany and Japan, while in most other instances, including several cases in Latin America, the Philippines, Vietnam, Afghanistan, and Iraq, American nation-building fell far short of its goals. Readings include theories of nation-building and historical case studies. Following approximately 8-10 class sessions, students will write research papers (approximately 25-30 pages) in close consultation with the instructor.
Psychology
 PSYC 3100Learning and the Neuroscience of Behavior
Fall 2021  19746 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed 48 / 48Cedric WilliamsTuTh 11:00am - 12:15pmMaury Hall 104
 The course will examine historical and current theories that address principles, concepts and research methodology associated with the study of learning and how these processes influence the emergence of behavior. This material will be integrated with contemporary findings from the field of neuroscience to reveal how emerging behavioral patterns are coordinated by communication between specific brain structures through discrete neural pathways.
 PSYC 4250Brain Systems Involved in Memory
Fall 2021  19050 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 21 / 25Cedric WilliamsTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amDell 2 102
 This course will explore the essential role of memory in everyday life and reveal how overt patterns of successful behavior are coordinated and executed by the vast amount of information stored in one or a combination of the six known memory systems. The seminar is designed to provide a comprehensive understanding of the biological and neural processes underlying learning, the mechanisms involved in encoding learned material into memory and the events that permit successful recall of life’s experiences to interact effectively in the environment.
Religion-African Religions
 RELA 2559New Course in African Religions
 Introduction to Africana Religions
 Introduction to Africana Religions
Fall 2021  20582 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed 20 / 20 (20 / 20)Ashon CrawleyTu 2:00pm - 4:30pmNau Hall 142
 This is an introductory survey course in which we will together explore the topic of Africana religions generally——including the practices of spirituality of black people in the Americas, the Caribbean, Europe and on the continent of Africa. Particular attention will be paid to the relations between these various locations, the similarities and differences. We will listen to music, watch film, read fiction, poetry, sacred texts and works of critical nonfiction.
Religion-Christianity
 RELC 2559New Course in Christianity
 Introduction to Africana Religions
 Introduction to Africana Religions
Fall 2021  20583 001Lecture (3 Units)Closed 20 / 20 (20 / 20)Ashon CrawleyTu 2:00pm - 4:30pmNau Hall 142
 This is an introductory survey course in which we will together explore the topic of Africana religions generally——including the practices of spirituality of black people in the Americas, the Caribbean, Europe and on the continent of Africa. Particular attention will be paid to the relations between these various locations, the similarities and differences. We will listen to music, watch film, read fiction, poetry, sacred texts and works of critical nonfiction.
 RELC 3240Medieval Mysticism
Fall 2021  18740 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 13 / 25 (37 / 40)Professor Kevin HartTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amNew Cabell Hall 389
 This course is also cross-listed with English as ENG 3515 ("Medieval Literature in Translation"), 18363
 This course introduces students to the flourishing of contemplative (or “mysticial”) writing from the twelfth to the fourteenth centuries. We will converge on The Cloud of Unknowing and Julian of Norwich’s Showings of Divine Love; but we will begin with the amazing treatise The Mystical Ark by Richard of St. Victor, which teaches its readers how to contemplate God in nature. Aquinas disapproved of the treatise, and we’ll find out why when we read his account of it in the Summa theologiæ. Is mysticism a matter of the mind or the heart or both? Is it directed solely to God or can one contemplate anything at all?
Religion-General Religion
 RELG 5821Proseminar in World Religions, World Literatures
 Meets with ENGL 5831; 1 cred/zoom workshop for grads of all depts who work on literature & religion
Fall 2021  19894 001SEM (1 Units)Open1 / 8Elizabeth FowlerFr 2:00pm - 2:50pmNew Cabell Hall 038
 1-credit, pass/fail, virtual workshop open to grads of all levels whose work engages religion and literature. Write me, fowler@virginia.edu, or Peter Ochs, pwo3v@virginia.edu, for zoom link and welcome!
South Asian Studies
 SAST 2050Classics of Indian Literature
Fall 2021  14317 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 31 / 35Richard CohenTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amWilson Hall 238
 This course fulfills the Non-Western Requirement. Based on the amount of writing for this course, I will sign a Second Writing Requirement form at the successful completion of the course.
 A survey of various "classical" genres of Indian literature, beginning with the Veda.
South Asian Literature in Translation
 SATR 3300Literature & Society in South Asia: Breaking the Cast(e)
Fall 2021  18944 001Lecture (3 Units)Open 10 / 35 (10 / 35)Mehr FarooqiTuTh 2:00pm - 3:15pmNew Cabell Hall 232
 meets second writing requirement (writing across the curriculum)
 In this course we will read fictional as well as non-fictional narratives of prominent Dalit writers. We will also watch films to comprehend and contextualize the readings with the backdrop of Dalit lives.
Sociology
 SOC 4559New Course in Sociology
 Politics of Data
Fall 2021  18376 001SEM (3 Units)Open 19 / 20Teresa SullivanMoWe 4:00pm - 5:15pmNew Cabell Hall 283
 Statistical agencies are often pressured by political actors in terms of how they collect and report data. The integrity of public data is challenged with advocacy statistics and allegations of "junk science," "fake data," and "alternative facts." We will look at problems and attempted solutions for the U.S. Census, labor statistics, health statistics, and data on poverty and homelessness. Students will learn criteria for judging data quality and complete a term project.
Statistics
 STAT 5559New Course in Statistics
 Statistics Under a Qualitative Mental Model
Fall 2021  20473 001Lecture (1 Units)Open17 / 30Dan SpitznerWe 1:00pm - 1:50pmChemistry Bldg 306
 This course explores the interaction of statistical methodology with research modes that emphasize qualitative knowledge. The course aims to provide background for participation in mixed methods teams, and minimally-technical exposure to Bayesian statistical methods. Topics include survey-level discussions of qualitative methodology, socially-inclusive research, arts-based research, mixed methods designs, and Bayesian statistics.
Science, Technology, and Society
 STS 2500Science and Technology in Social and Global Context
 Ethical Analytics: Using Data for Social Good
Fall 2021  16850 002Lecture (3 Units)Closed34 / 30 (34 / 30)co-taught by Caitlin Wylie and Gianluca GuadagniMoWe 2:00pm - 3:15pmWilsdorf Hall 101
 Experts rely on data analytics to inform decision-making about crucial social issues, such as education, employment, access to loans, healthcare, public safety, and reliable research. However, decision-makers tend to trust the outcomes of data analytics without understanding the complex, black-boxed methods that produced these outcomes, such as statistical models and machine-learning algorithms. This course uses case studies of the social implications of datasets to prepare you to 1) investigate techniques of data analytics to open the techniques’ black boxes and understand how they work in order to decide whether they are trustworthy and 2) ask questions about the ethical implications of these techniques and how we use them to shape each other’s lives in order to judge how to best perform ethical analytics.
 STS 4500STS and Engineering Practice
 Course is mostly virtual, check description
Syllabus  15965 018Lecture (3 Units)Closed 36 / 33Sean FergusonTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmWeb-Based Course
 Sean FergusonTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmThornton Hall D222
 Sean FergusonTuTh 3:30pm - 4:45pmThornton Hall D222
 Primarily virtual with hybrid options during critical weeks ---Who is in charge here? I advocate for flattening the hierarchies in our learning community, this should not be me dispensing knowledge and you repeating it back to me. We will be figuring out how to turn our group into a transformation space where each of us can thrive. You will be significantly more in charge of your own learning goals and objectives. My mission is to be more of a mentor/coach so that you can bolster your strengths and overcome your challenges. There might be a few TA's to help out if I get authorization and find some good ones. ---You can find me at: We will talk about Collab, Zoom, Slack, Discord, and other options as a more rapid response option Smf6p@virginia.edu (black hole sometimes) cell (emergency; linked to personal mobile; released later) ---When and How do we work together? --Short answer: variable but highly structured.  --Long answer, the course is broken up into two halves. The first half is developing sociotechnical and professional skills. The latter half is deploying those skills into a research proposal that will become that starting point for STS4600 in the Spring. -In-person synchronous classes in the first two weeks; recorded for those than need it for asynchronous needs. This assumes we have a room and/or can meet with reasonable accommodation for a social science methods "fieldtrip"--if you can't make class the fieldtrip together, virtual options are available.  -Several weeks of (a)synch flipped classroom where class is setup for refining understanding of content, practicing methods, and sharing assignment outcomes. Modules will be available before class or be provided as recordings for those needing asynchronous learning or review. If you miss anything, hours are allocated outside of class time ("office hours"). -In-person workshopping sessions to check on learning and pivot into research questions at the midpoint of the semester for those that can make it; we might dispense with this depending on demand and University authorization. Regardless, virtual options will be available for your needs. -Several weeks of (a)synch flipped classrooms designed to refine the research projects and your skill development until we turn in final assignments.  -A full schedule is contained in Collab by start of class.
 Course is mostly virtual, check description
Syllabus  15966 019Lecture (3 Units)Closed 33 / 33Sean FergusonTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amWeb-Based Course
 Sean FergusonTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amThornton Hall E304
 Sean FergusonTuTh 9:30am - 10:45amThornton Hall E304
 Primarily virtual with hybrid options during critical weeks ---Who is in charge here? I advocate for flattening the hierarchies in our learning community, this should not be me dispensing knowledge and you repeating it back to me. We will be figuring out how to turn our group into a transformation space where each of us can thrive. You will be significantly more in charge of your own learning goals and objectives. My mission is to be more of a mentor/coach so that you can bolster your strengths and overcome your challenges. There might be a few TA's to help out if I get authorization and find some good ones. ---You can find me at: We will talk about Collab, Zoom, Slack, Discord, and other options as a more rapid response option Smf6p@virginia.edu (black hole sometimes) cell (emergency; linked to personal mobile; released later) ---When and How do we work together? --Short answer: variable but highly structured.  --Long answer, the course is broken up into two halves. The first half is developing sociotechnical and professional skills. The latter half is deploying those skills into a research proposal that will become that starting point for STS4600 in the Spring. -In-person synchronous classes in the first two weeks; recorded for those than need it for asynchronous needs. This assumes we have a room and/or can meet with reasonable accommodation for a social science methods "fieldtrip"--if you can't make class the fieldtrip together, virtual options are available.  -Several weeks of (a)synch flipped classroom where class is setup for refining understanding of content, practicing methods, and sharing assignment outcomes. Modules will be available before class or be provided as recordings for those needing asynchronous learning or review. If you miss anything, hours are allocated outside of class time ("office hours"). -In-person workshopping sessions to check on learning and pivot into research questions at the midpoint of the semester for those that can make it; we might dispense with this depending on demand and University authorization. Regardless, virtual options will be available for your needs. -Several weeks of (a)synch flipped classrooms designed to refine the research projects and your skill development until we turn in final assignments.  -A full schedule is contained in Collab by start of class.
 Course is mostly virtual, check description
Syllabus  16034 020Lecture (3 Units)Closed 34 / 33Sean FergusonTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmWeb-Based Course
 Sean FergusonTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmRice Hall 032
 Sean FergusonTuTh 12:30pm - 1:45pmRice Hall 032
 Primarily virtual with hybrid options during critical weeks ---Who is in charge here? I advocate for flattening the hierarchies in our learning community, this should not be me dispensing knowledge and you repeating it back to me. We will be figuring out how to turn our group into a transformation space where each of us can thrive. You will be significantly more in charge of your own learning goals and objectives. My mission is to be more of a mentor/coach so that you can bolster your strengths and overcome your challenges. There might be a few TA's to help out if I get authorization and find some good ones. ---You can find me at: We will talk about Collab, Zoom, Slack, Discord, and other options as a more rapid response option Smf6p@virginia.edu (black hole sometimes) cell (emergency; linked to personal mobile; released later) ---When and How do we work together? --Short answer: variable but highly structured.  --Long answer, the course is broken up into two halves. The first half is developing sociotechnical and professional skills. The latter half is deploying those skills into a research proposal that will become that starting point for STS4600 in the Spring. -In-person synchronous classes in the first two weeks; recorded for those than need it for asynchronous needs. This assumes we have a room and/or can meet with reasonable accommodation for a social science methods "fieldtrip"--if you can't make class the fieldtrip together, virtual options are available.  -Several weeks of (a)synch flipped classroom where class is setup for refining understanding of content, practicing methods, and sharing assignment outcomes. Modules will be available before class or be provided as recordings for those needing asynchronous learning or review. If you miss anything, hours are allocated outside of class time ("office hours"). -In-person workshopping sessions to check on learning and pivot into research questions at the midpoint of the semester for those that can make it; we might dispense with this depending on demand and University authorization. Regardless, virtual options will be available for your needs. -Several weeks of (a)synch flipped classrooms designed to refine the research projects and your skill development until we turn in final assignments.  -A full schedule is contained in Collab by start of class.
Systems & Information Engineering
 SYS 6581Selected Topics in Systems Engineering
 Autonomous Mobile Robots
Website  16203 002Lecture (3 Units)Closed 11 / 11 (40 / 40)Nicola BezzoWe 12:30pm - 1:45pmRice Hall 120
 Nicola BezzoTu 5:00pm - 6:15pmOlsson Hall 011
 Have you ever wonder how a google car or a Mars rover work? Or how a drone can fly autonomously and track an object on the ground? ...Then, this is the class for you!
 Have you ever wonder how a google car work? Or how a drone can fly autonomously? Then, this is the class for you. The objective of this course is to provide the basic concepts and algorithms required to develop mobile robots that act autonomously in complex environments. The main emphasis is on mobile robot locomotion and kinematics, control, sensing, localization, mapping, path planning, and motion planning. The class is organized in lectures on Tuesday and labs on Wednesday where you will have the chance to program state-of-the-art ground and aerial vehicles! Please note that this class is combined in Systems Eng (SYS 6581), Electrical and Computer Eng (ECE 6501), and Computer Science (CS 6501). In case one section is close, please try to enroll in any of the other sections.
University Studies
 UNST 8130Teaching & Learning in Higher Education
Fall 2021  18997 001SEM (1 Units)Open 12 / 18Adriana StreiferTu 2:00pm - 3:30pmMonroe Hall 114
 Full course description: Where do our educational practices come from? What is it that we hope to achieve as educators, and why do we have those goals? Through our own educational experiences, each of us has inherited assumptions and beliefs about the purposes and nature of education, but rarely do we examine the origins, utility, or coherence of those beliefs. This seminar invites graduate students to explore several theories and philosophies of education, so that they may form their own philosophies to guide their professional development and practice as educators. We will examine historical and contemporary perspectives on topics such as psychological and social development, human rights, social justice, and civic engagement to determine what it means for us to be effective educators in the world of 21st century higher education.
University Seminar
 USEM 1570University Seminar
 Designing a Carbon Neutral Future
Fall 2021  17466 004SEM (2 Units)Open 15 / 18Ethan HeilMo 3:00pm - 4:50pmThe Rotunda Room 150
 Do you wonder how we can begin to address the existential threat of climate change? Decarbonization describes the broad set of strategies to do just that. Designing a Carbon Neutral Future is an interactive seminar designed to engage students in the rapidly evolving concept of economy-wide decarbonization - and will directly inform UVA’s ‘Carbon Neutral by 2030’ commitment. This course will introduce the concept, rationale, mechanisms, and pathways underlying decarbonization. Students will become familiar with the major sectors contributing to climate change and analyze pathways for decarbonization. Over the course of the semester, students will work in multidisciplinary teams to select a unit of the University with which to collaborate and develop a carbon neutral plan. Weekly guest speakers with expertise in each sector will be invited to provide insight and act as a resource for student groups.